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Go Georgia: Places to enjoy music across Georgia


Matilda’s Under the Pines, Alpharetta

Pack a picnic, grab a lawn chair and head to Matilda’s Under the Pines for an evening of live music. The outdoor music venue hosts Music Under the Tent, a spring and summer concert series that features artists from all over the Southeast, including many from Georgia. Everything — from southern rock, delta blues, funk and folk — is played here. 

377 South Main St., Alpharetta, Ga., (770) 754-7831, matildasmusicvenue.com

RELATED LINKS:

Go Georgia: Where to enjoy sports, outdoors, and adventure in Georgia

Go Georgia: Historical sites to visit in Georgia

Go Georgia: Where to see and experience art in Georgia

Go Georgia: Where to enjoy unique, delicious food in Georgia

Dahlonega Appalachian Jam, Dahlonega

The hills are alive with the sound of music in Dahlonega. The Appalachian Jam, a celebration of traditional mountain music, is held on the public square every Saturday from April 23-Oct. 8. Pick a shady spot and tap your toes to some old-time fiddle and banjo pieces, or sing along to a poignant ballad. The jam session is open to musicians of all skill levels, and they come from near and far to showcase their talents.

1 Public Square, Dahlonega, Ga., (706) 482-2707, dahlonegaappalachianjam.org

The Big House Museum, Macon

Today it’s a museum, but from 1970-1973 the Tudor-style house on Vineville Street in Macon was home to the Allman Brothers band members and their families. The southern rock notables were at the height of their fame. When they weren’t on the road, they were in the house writing music and holding jam sessions in what’s now the Fillmore East Room, named for the band’s 1971 breakthrough album, “At Fillmore East.”

Guitars, concert posters, vintage photos and clothing worn during performances are among the memorabilia on display.

In the summer, concerts are held on the back lawn.

2321 Vineville Ave., Macon, Ga., (478) 741-5551, thebighousemuseum.com



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