Even one drink per day can increase your risk of cancer, study warns


Do you enjoy the occasional cocktail? Beware, because even moderate consumption of alcohol can increase your risk of cancer, according to a new report

» RELATED: Women who use IUDs may have reduced risk of cervical cancer, study says

Researchers from the American Society of Clinical Oncology recently conducted an experiment, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, to determine the link between drinking and the disease. 

To do so, they looked at several studies that found a strong correlation between alcohol and cancer.

After gathering all the data, they concluded that about 3.5 percent of all cancer-related deaths were due to alcohol consumption. 

Furthermore, in 2012, they discovered approximately 5.5 percent of all new cancer occurrences and 5.8 percent of all cancer deaths worldwide were attributable to drinking alcohol.

"The importance of alcohol drinking as a contributing factor to the overall cancer burden is often underappreciated," the organization said in a statement. "Associations between alcohol drinking and cancer risk have been observed consistently regardless of the specific type of alcoholic beverages."

» RELATED: 7 surprising things that can increase your risk of cancer

While researchers did note the greatest risk was among those with heavy and long-term use and those who also smoked cigarettes, moderate drinking is risky, too. Scientists described moderate as up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men.

This was particularly the case with oropharyngeal and breast cancer.

“A meta-analysis that focused solely on cancer risks associated with drinking one drink or fewer per day observed that this level of alcohol consumption was still associated with some elevated risk for ... oropharyngeal cancer and breast cancer,” the authors wrote. 

But researchers aren’t suggesting you get rid of your booze altogether. They want individuals to recognize “that excessive alcohol use can delay or negatively impact cancer treatment and that reducing high-risk alcohol consumption is cancer prevention,” they wrote. 

To prevent high-risk alcohol consumption, researchers believe lawmakers and health care providers should implement specific strategies and policies.

Some suggestions include limiting youth exposure to advertising of alcoholic beverages and increasing alcohol prices and taxes. 

Scientists also hope to conduct more research.

“Systems-based research,” the report said, “including research into successful means for the oncology community to identify patients who are currently using alcohol or who may be at high risk for alcohol relapse, will be critical.”

» RELATED: Sugar can fuel cancerous cells , study says

Reader Comments ...

Next Up in Nation & World

Black Friday 2017: Get these Walmart deals on laptops, TVs and more now
Black Friday 2017: Get these Walmart deals on laptops, TVs and more now

Last week, Walmart revealed its Black Friday online discounts would begin as early as Nov. 9, while in-store bargains will start on Nov. 23 on Thanksgiving.  Most Walmart chains will be open all day on Thanksgiving, but Black Friday sales begin at 6 p.m.  “There’s only one place to shop this Black Friday – Walmart,&rdquo...
Talking, bike-riding parrot escapes, found in 40-foot-tall tree 
Talking, bike-riding parrot escapes, found in 40-foot-tall tree 

Willow the parrot can ride a bicycle, roller skate and talk.  Susan Whiteeagle spent nearly $20,000 and countless hours training the bird.  Then Monday, he took flight, and flapped out through the front door, which had been left open.  “I see him go right out the door,” Whiteeagle told KNOE. “ I couldn’t...
These tiny superheroes overcome the odds to become the Justice League
These tiny superheroes overcome the odds to become the Justice League

They face insurmountable odds, but that’s not stopping a group of kids from fulfilling their superhero dreams. Josh Rossi is a photographer who helped the group of children, who are living with either disease or disability, to see their inner heroes, calling the six children the real Justice League.  >> Read more trending news...
Twitter slams J. Crew for photo of black model with unkempt, messy hair
Twitter slams J. Crew for photo of black model with unkempt, messy hair

J. Crew is facing a bit of criticism after a photo of one of its models and her seemingly unkempt hair surfaced online. The black woman, dressed in a Madewell dress, was photographed with her natural hair messily pulled back in a ponytail. But everyone wasn’t impressed with the look. One Twitter user took to the platform to express her disapproval...
Sen. Al Franken championed a Minnesota rape survivor’s bill. Now she wants a new sponsor.
Sen. Al Franken championed a Minnesota rape survivor’s bill. Now she wants a new sponsor.

It was on a November evening in 2014, after a tailgate party on her University of Minnesota campus, that Abby Honold was brutally raped by a fellow student. Despite going to the hospital in an ambulance with bruises and bite marks, despite reporting everything to police, it would take more than a year for Honold to find justice.  In August 2016...
More Stories