Opinion


Opinion: Dear Ga.’s newly elected leaders

In a sense, the campaign might have been the easy thing, however counterintuitive that seems. After a long, bruising haul of a rancorous campaign, Brian Kemp gained a close victory that brought him the current interim title of Georgia Governor-elect. That win means he must now make the transition from campaigning to governing. We’d be surprised if the latter work does not prove much more difficult...


Opinion: For 2020, Democrats need to look forward

Opinion: For 2020, Democrats need to look forward

John Kerry has been a superb public servant, beginning with his heroic service in Vietnam and extending through a 28-year career in the Senate and a productive four-year stint as secretary of state. He is as qualified as anyone in U.S. history to serve as president of the United States. Yet, John Kerry should not run for president in 2020.
Opinion: ‘Everybody knew’ about Russian contacts, lies Trump

Opinion: ‘Everybody knew’ about Russian contacts, lies Trump

Over and over in the 2016 campaign, Donald Trump denied any contacts with Russia or Russians. “I have nothing to do with Russia,” he said. “I have no relationship with Russia whatsoever.” Trump denied it during the primaries; he denied it into the general election. He denied it in interviews, in debates, in speeches and rallies.
Opinion: Thoughts from New Birth Missionary Baptist’s new pastor

Opinion: Thoughts from New Birth Missionary Baptist’s new pastor

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, a renowned Morehouse man, once said “It must be borne in mind that the tragedy of life doesn’t lie in not reaching your goal. The tragedy lies in having no goal to reach. It isn’t a calamity to die with dreams unfulfilled, but it is a calamity not to dream.

Opinion: Finally, some real-life election fraud

For years, Republicans have warned about widespread voting-fraud allegedly swaying election outcomes. The claim has become a conservative obsession, with President Trump even alleging that up to five million illegal immigrants voted in the 2016 elections, just enough to account for his loss in the popular vote.

Opinion: People make the difference in leadership journey

Since 2010, GeorgiaForward has been bringing people, organizations and businesses together that do not normally interact and having them focus on creative ways to improve the future of Georgia. The 2018 GeorgiaForward Forum continued this tradition.

Opinion: Big problems require bold leaders

Georgia is what the South is becoming: a dynamic and evolving region. It is characterized by rapidly shifting racial and ethnic demographics, a population getting younger by the year, high migration rates both from the North and from countries south of our borders. Georgia is also home to some of the largest variations in income in the country.

Opinion: We listen to, appreciate feedback

“I didn’t really want deadlines and editorial work. I wanted something mechanical and eight hours a day. So I went to work, thinking it was easy – ha, ha – on the complaint desk …” – Katharine Graham, legendary publisher of The Washington Post. Here, at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, we really don’t have a complaint desk, per se.

Opinion: Communities change when we all pitch in

We have become a nation obsessed with grand gestures, sweeping pronouncements and, alas, unimaginative solutions to intricate problems. In so many areas of public life, we prefer showmanship and bluster to reasoned, sober discourse.

Opinion: Gathering around common interests

Any grassroots civic effort that can unite productive people around goals most all reasonable folks share deserves encouragement, especially in divided times like these, we believe. Thus, we’re glad that inclement weather did not deter this year’s GeorgiaForward Forum in Macon.
Opinion: Bush, like all presidents, was neither saint nor sinner

Opinion: Bush, like all presidents, was neither saint nor sinner

Which one you are I’d like to wake up and find.” – sung by the Clovers My former boss, CEO of a national healthcare corporation and an MD/LLB, ran Bush Sr.’s California campaign and was a personal friend of his. He loved Barbara and George and raised a tremendous amount of money for Bush.
Opinion: Keep drinking Atlanta’s tap water

Opinion: Keep drinking Atlanta’s tap water

A few days ago, I, along with thousands of other Atlanta residents, was told that my water is not safe to drink. The Atlanta Department of Watershed issued a citywide boil water advisory due to a malfunction in the Hemphill Water Treatment plant.

Opinion: The George H.W. Bush I knew

George Herbert Walker Bush, whose careful custodianship of the unraveling of the old Soviet Union shaped a safer world for hundreds of millions, was mourned by a grateful nation Wednesday in a state funeral that brought together Republicans and Democrats in an increasingly rare demonstration of civility.

Opinion: New fisheries policy good for oceans, sportfishing

In 1976, U.S. Senators Warren Magnuson and Ted Stevens led the development and passage of the nation’s primary marine fisheries management law. The Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Conservation and Management Act (MSA) was designed to protect marine species and the rights of recreational anglers by stopping the over-harvesting of our oceans by the commercial fishing industry.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 6

Liberal Luckovich hits new, indecent low I was shocked and disgusted to see Mike Luckovich’s cartoon of Tuesday (“For fun, we seated Trump next to Dana Carvey,” Opinion, Dec. 4). To use the passing of past-President George H.W. Bush to take a swipe at current President Trump was the lowest of the low.

Opinion: Stop Left-wing’s corpse abuse

Impolite question, but it needs to be asked: Is there a Republican dead body that left-wing partisans won’t use to bash Donald Trump? This week’s partisan corpse abusers callously exploited the passing of George H.W. Bush, America’s 41st president, to get in their digs at the current commander in chief.

Opinion: We bury a man of honor

This week, we bury a man of honor. And by honor, I don’t mean the type of honor that accrues to a person just by virtue of rising to the presidency, because not all who achieve that post are people of honor. Nor do I mean any kind of honor conferred by others through popularity, fame or high ratings.
Opinion: This isn’t normal, or acceptable

Opinion: This isn’t normal, or acceptable

This week, President Donald Trump retweeted an image that accuses multiple political opponents of committing treason against the United States of America, demanding that they be prosecuted and imprisoned for their crime. Think about that for a moment, because it is extraordinary.
Opinion: Key regional issues await next governor’s attention

Opinion: Key regional issues await next governor’s attention

Dear Governor-elect: You will step into the Governor’s Mansion as our nation is experiencing historic political divisiveness. However, here in Georgia, our state leaders have worked together to make progress on several key issues, from transportation to economic development. As a result, Georgia remains the number one state for business.

Opinion: Stories from 2018 that insipired us, others

Meet the Delaneys. Hopefully, you already know their story. When Amy and Derron Delaney married more than 20 years ago, they imagined a blended family that included their kids from previous marriages along with more babies they’d have together. They would have more kids together — just not in the biological sense.
Opinion: Silicon Valley ‘sharia’ shows tech’s Left-wing bias

Opinion: Silicon Valley ‘sharia’ shows tech’s Left-wing bias

This is a tale of two young, outspoken women in media. One is a liberal tech writer. The other is an enterprising conservative new media reporter. One has achieved meteoric success and now works at a top American newspaper. The other has been de-platformed and marginalized. Their wildly different fates tell you everything you need to know about Silicon Valley’s free speech double standards....
Opinion: Two years of bluster wear thin for Trump

Opinion: Two years of bluster wear thin for Trump

As Donald Trump tells it, he got “very tough” in a recent conversation with the head of General Motors about the layoff of some 14,000 people and the closure of four U.S. auto plants: “You’re playing around with the wrong person ….,” Trump claims to have warned CEO Mary Barra.
Opinion: Poor EMS governance bad for market, worse for patients

Opinion: Poor EMS governance bad for market, worse for patients

When eight-year-old Ethan Hall broke his leg after falling from a slide near his home in southwest Atlanta last month, his father couldn’t have imagined it would take an hour and a half for an ambulance to arrive and another two before it finally deposited his son in the care of doctors.
Opinion: Multinational drug gangs worsen epidemic

Opinion: Multinational drug gangs worsen epidemic

The relationship between the United States and Canada of late has been nothing short of tumultuous. However, in the midst of the bitter exchanges and more recent positive developments on trade, a unique opportunity exists to help save lives and protect our respective borders.
Opinion: Looking across holiday seasons

Opinion: Looking across holiday seasons

Another Thanksgiving holiday weekend is edging toward its close. Many of us are blessed in that memories of good times with family and friends this weekend will last far longer than the leftovers that now pack our refrigerators.

Opinion: Thankful for simple things in a troubled year

A blind Negro woman from Georgia, visiting her brother in Indianapolis, may be one of America’s most thankful people on this day of national thanksgiving. Mrs. Mary Mullins will be in Indianapolis thanks to the generosity of members of the Communications Workers of America union, who financed her jet flight in appreciation of her work as a volunteer speaker for the United Appeal.
Opinion: Holiday season’s needs demand love, action

Opinion: Holiday season’s needs demand love, action

In the midst of our busy lives, we can miss seeing the need all around us. Need is hard to see. It’s invisible. Just by looking we can’t usually tell if someone is homeless, hungry, desperately alone or suicidal. Pain and fear hide in the eyes and hearts of a child walking beside her mother, or the tough-looking teenager walking down the street.
READERS WRITE: NOV. 20

READERS WRITE: NOV. 20

The transportation problem in metro Atlanta is not a lack of rail transit or “good roads,” nor is it a lack of encouraging people to move into denser settlements and ride trains instead of drive. The problem is traffic congestion, and a solution must provide a cost-benefit for all throughout an area the size of Massachusetts. Over half of the state’s population (5.
Opinion: Toward a better Ga. elections system

Opinion: Toward a better Ga. elections system

There might be a rare sign of bipartisan agreement to say that Georgia’s midterm election – and its aftermath – amounts to a mess. As a result, the reputation of our state has been tarnished – not a small thing in this growing place that regularly touts that we’re the best location for business.
Opinion: Safeguard access, security of democracy’s sacred rite

Opinion: Safeguard access, security of democracy’s sacred rite

Not too long ago, the Supreme Court wrote, “No right is more precious in a free country than that of having a choice in the election of those who make the laws under which, as good citizens, they must live. Other rights, even the most basic, are illusory if the right to vote is undermined.” And there are many ways to undermine the right to vote.
Opinion: Ga. needs fair, open, accurate, secure elections

Opinion: Ga. needs fair, open, accurate, secure elections

On July 4, 1944, Primus King, a duly registered voter, walked into the Muscogee County Courthouse to cast a ballot in the primary election. He was thrown out into the street. It took almost two years for the Supreme Court to uphold Primus King’s right to vote. What happened to Primus King was a horrible injustice. Regretfully, Georgia’s past is stained with similar injustices.
Opinion: Trump shrugs off constitutional shackles

Opinion: Trump shrugs off constitutional shackles

In an interview this week with the Daily Caller, President Trump was asked who he might nominate to replace Jeff Sessions as attorney general. Trump didn’t answer, instead using the question to laud acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker as “a very respected man.” Whitaker is not a very respected man.
Opinion: A profound reason to be thankful

Opinion: A profound reason to be thankful

As we head into this week of Thanksgiving, I’ve been overcome by so many things. Things like the divisiveness of our nation. Things like witnessing blatant racism in our communities and across the country. Worrying about whether my child is safe in her school.
Opinion : The how, what and why of a Trump lie

Opinion : The how, what and why of a Trump lie

Donald Trump lies with an audacity and on a scale never before seen in American politics, and it’s tempting to get so caught up in the showmanship of it all that you miss what makes it work. So let me propose a different approach.
READERS WRITE: NOV. 13

READERS WRITE: NOV. 13

I don’t understand those who vote so far in advance of Election Day. The possibilities are real that last-minute information may become available that could affect your decision, yet you have cast your vote and have no recourse.
Opinion: Conservatives will keep pushing good American solutions

Opinion: Conservatives will keep pushing good American solutions

Wow! What an election night! I want to share with you our thinking here at Heritage on the results and what they mean for the conservative agenda. I’m thrilled with the conservative gains in the Senate and want to congratulate all those who stood for conservative values on the campaign trail and will now do so in Washington.
Opinion: Election outcome product of two weak parties

Opinion: Election outcome product of two weak parties

In the wake of an election, we naturally tend to be struck by the strength of the winning side. Who now has momentum in our politics, and what sort of mandate have they won? But the peculiar mixed result of Tuesday’s midterms should help us see the distinct and troubling character of our politics now: It is the weakness of all sides, and the strength of none, that shapes this moment.
Opinion: Exploring an historic election

Opinion: Exploring an historic election

Today, we present several opinion viewpoints that take stock of a notable midterm election week in America. Tuesday’s election allowed voters, in time-honored fashion, to have their say in choosing who should represent them in halls of government. Some questions were handily resolved, such as the balance of power among Republicans and Democrats in Congress.
Opinion: War escalates in Washington

Opinion: War escalates in Washington

If you were wondering what the next two years might be like in Washington, wonder no longer. In President Trump’s words, it’s going to be a “warlike posture,” and that war began in a combative post-election press conference in which a defensive, angry Trump made clear that anybody who dares to cross him would become a target.
Opinion: The election no one won

Opinion: The election no one won

An historic election is behind us, yet we have settled nothing. A record turnout, all those billions of dollars, all that angry rhetoric and fear, and not a damn thing is resolved. To the contrary, the stage has now been set for confrontations over the next 24 months that are likely to prove more bitter, divisive and dangerous than those that got us here.
Opinion: Plowing past a bitter harvest

Opinion: Plowing past a bitter harvest

Americans of goodwill are mourning the 11 people murdered Oct. 27 at a Pittsburgh synagogue. The anti-Semitic hatred that authorities say motivated the accused killer is being rightly condemned by many. Bringing the suspected gunman through the justice system, while fully appropriate, cannot heal the surrounding problem of the corrosive spirit now running largely unchecked across America.

Opinion: Manhood, Moola, McConnell and Trumpism

After Tuesday’s testy exchange between Donald Trump and Democratic leaders, it seems quite possible that the tweeter in chief will shut down the government in an attempt to get funding for a wall on the Mexican border. What’s remarkable about this prospect is that the wall is an utterly stupid idea.

Opinion: Collusion is possible

It has become an article of faith in some quarters on the right — well, most — that Robert Mueller’s investigation has found no evidence of collusion with Russia and has accordingly shifted gears to process crimes like lying to the FBI or obstruction of justice. Having decided that this must be true, many have called for Mueller to wrap it up.

Opinion: The lost and the entitled

When I popped open the old laptop, the Geek Squad guy said maybe I should dust it off. He slid a canister of Endust toward me. “Spray the cloth,” he said, “not the machine.” I started choking on my sense of humiliation. This poor baby was covered with dust.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 16

Sick of Luckovich degrading President Trump I loved the poignant political cartoon by Mike Luckovich, showing former president George H.W. Bush meeting Barbara and their three-year-old daughter who died. I couldn’t help but think that Luckovich must be really sad. Not from the content of the cartoon, but that he had to spend a day without degrading President Trump.

Opinion: The most powerful reject in the world

He’s not wanted. Not at funerals, though the Bush family, to show class and respect for tradition, held their noses and made an exception. Not in England, where they turned him into a big, hideous blimp.

Opinion: There’s a word for Democrats’ negotiating strategy: Insanity

WASHINGTON — Good news for the incoming House Democratic majority! They have something President Trump really, really wants: money to build a border wall. Trump is desperate for this money. Mexico won’t give it to him. Only congressional Democrats can. Without their consent, he can’t deliver on one of the key campaign promises he made during the 2016 election.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 14

Pols bear blame for slow-mo migrant invasion A single immigrant — even one entering our country illegally — may not be a problem. And not seeing that person’s illegal entry as an invasion is understandable.

Opinion: How democracy is losing the world

If Donald Trump told Michael Cohen to pay hush money to Stormy Daniels about a one-night stand a decade ago, that, says Jerome Nadler, incoming chair of House Judiciary, would be an “impeachable offense.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 13

More taxes, spending won’t affect climate change “Future Disasters” (News, Dec. 3) is a good warning, but it is made under false pretense. More taxes and subsidies will have no effect on climate change; stopping the human population explosion might. A former vice president spoke in support of a one-child-per-family policy; however, public pressure made him retract that.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 12

Screen dependence cause of many social ills I think columnist Mona Charen is on to something very important (“Decline of family a depressing problem,” Opinion, Dec. 2). In her last paragraph, she mentions our relationship to screens. More and more, that seems to be our only connection to the outside world.

Opinion: Acceptable racism

How appropriate would it be for a major publicly held American company to hire a person with a history of having publicly made the following statements and many others like them? (In the interest of brevity, I shall list only four.) “The world could get by just fine with zero black people.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 11

Pitts hypocritically defends migrant lawbreakers Leonard Pitts’ loopy, far-left column (“Gassing of migrants reveals the smallness of America,” Opinion, Dec. 2) was absolute mush. I would like to ask Mr.

Opinion: The case against meritocracy

This week I briefly trended on Twitter — a bracing experience for any columnist because it means you’ve done your job of provocation a little bit too well. In my particular case the provocation was a column about the phenomenon of George H.W.

Opinion: ‘There is no such thing as a child prostitute’

No one even knows how many girls there were. Federal prosecutors identified 36. In “Perversion of Justice,” a stunning piece of investigative work by Julie K. Brown that was published last week, the Miami Herald reported that it has found 80. But accounts given by the girls themselves suggest there may be hundreds. Hundreds.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 9

Editorial wrongly overlooked lack of Ga. healthcare I am writing in response to Andre Jackson’s editorial on Sunday, Dec. 2. His statement “After all, we’re in a good place now, but still not where the state should be.” Andre then went on to mention several issues, but he made no mention of the many citizens with no access to healthcare.

Opinion: Trump gets it all wrong

Midterm election update from the Department of Irony: Republicans have been warning us about the danger of voter fraud for ages. And now it does appear that a major congressional race was impacted by that very type of evil-doing. Feel free to chortle/snort/howl at the moon when I tell you the accused fraudsters are Republicans.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 7

Rejection of God could be behind unusual weather Re: “Future Disasters: Floods, hurricanes and fires: Georgia faces dire climate warnings” (News, Dec.

Opinion: The GOP’s church tax

Republicans tax churches to help pay for big corporate giveaway. You would be forgiven for thinking that this is a headline from The Onion or the fantasy of some left-wing website. But it’s exactly what happened in the big corporate tax cut the GOP passed last year.

Opinion: Will Paris riots scuttle Climate Accord?

In Katowice, Poland, all the signers of the 2015 Paris climate accord are gathered to assess how the world’s nations are meeting their goals to cut carbon emissions. Certainly, the communications strategy in the run-up was impressive. In October came that apocalyptic U.N. report warning that the world is warming faster than we thought and the disasters coming sooner than we thought.

Opinion: Forget trinkets — these gifts change lives

‘Tis the season when we inflict on one another neckties and perfumes that no one really wants, plus more than $1 billion in gift cards that are never even redeemed. Hence my annual column with suggestions for “gifts with meaning” that are warmer than any scarf.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 5

Tired of wrongs perpetrated by liberals, media If Robert Mueller had anything definitive with which to charge Donald Trump with interfering with Hillary Clinton’s loss, it would have been presented by now. American taxpayers have spent needlessly $30 million and wasted 18 months that could have gone toward investigating the Clinton Foundation.

Opinion: Miseducated or stupid?

A recent Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation survey found that 51 percent of American millennials would rather live in a socialist or communist country than in a capitalist country. Only 42 percent prefer the latter. Twenty-five percent of millennials who know who Vladimir Lenin was view him favorably. Lenin was the first premier of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

READERS WRITE: DEC. 4

Use command of English, not interpreters, to vote I implore the staff of the civil rights organization that filed a lawsuit to remove the restriction on the use of interpreters in state elections (“Lawsuit fights restrictions on interpreters,” Metro, Nov. 29) to redirect their money and effort to improving the English language skills of those who are not proficient.

Opinion: On a mission from God, but to do what?

When is the murder of a missionary a martyrdom, and when is it a justifiable act of self-defense by an insular culture that doesn’t take the threat of incursion by outsiders lightly? That conundrum lies at the heart of the unfortunate demise of John Allen Chau.

Opinion: Under Trump, the swamp is draining

Impeachment is a political act, and the endgame of the Robert Mueller investigation may not deliver the stark evidence that would remove Donald Trump from office.
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