Opinion


Opinion: Exploring an historic election

Today, we present several opinion viewpoints that take stock of a notable midterm election week in America. Tuesday’s election allowed voters, in time-honored fashion, to have their say in choosing who should represent them in halls of government. Some questions were handily resolved, such as the balance of power among Republicans and Democrats in Congress. Others remain unsettled as of this...


Opinion : The how, what and why of a Trump lie

Donald Trump lies with an audacity and on a scale never before seen in American politics, and it’s tempting to get so caught up in the showmanship of it all that you miss what makes it work. So let me propose a different approach.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 13

Early voting’s for those who toe Democratic party line I don’t understand those who vote so far in advance of Election Day. The possibilities are real that last-minute information may become available that could affect your decision, yet you have cast your vote and have no recourse.
Opinion: Conservatives will keep pushing good American solutions

Opinion: Conservatives will keep pushing good American solutions

Wow! What an election night! I want to share with you our thinking here at Heritage on the results and what they mean for the conservative agenda. I’m thrilled with the conservative gains in the Senate and want to congratulate all those who stood for conservative values on the campaign trail and will now do so in Washington.
Opinion: Election outcome product of two weak parties

Opinion: Election outcome product of two weak parties

In the wake of an election, we naturally tend to be struck by the strength of the winning side. Who now has momentum in our politics, and what sort of mandate have they won? But the peculiar mixed result of Tuesday’s midterms should help us see the distinct and troubling character of our politics now: It is the weakness of all sides, and the strength of none, that shapes this moment.
Opinion: War escalates in Washington

Opinion: War escalates in Washington

If you were wondering what the next two years might be like in Washington, wonder no longer. In President Trump’s words, it’s going to be a “warlike posture,” and that war began in a combative post-election press conference in which a defensive, angry Trump made clear that anybody who dares to cross him would become a target.
Opinion: The election no one won

Opinion: The election no one won

An historic election is behind us, yet we have settled nothing. A record turnout, all those billions of dollars, all that angry rhetoric and fear, and not a damn thing is resolved. To the contrary, the stage has now been set for confrontations over the next 24 months that are likely to prove more bitter, divisive and dangerous than those that got us here.
Opinion: Plowing past a bitter harvest

Opinion: Plowing past a bitter harvest

Americans of goodwill are mourning the 11 people murdered Oct. 27 at a Pittsburgh synagogue. The anti-Semitic hatred that authorities say motivated the accused killer is being rightly condemned by many. Bringing the suspected gunman through the justice system, while fully appropriate, cannot heal the surrounding problem of the corrosive spirit now running largely unchecked across America.
Opinion: The long journey to vanquish hate must continue

Opinion: The long journey to vanquish hate must continue

I grew up in Pittsburgh with Cecil Rosenthal, one of the victims of the hideous massacre in Squirrel Hill. Cecil had some developmental disabilities, and he only saw good in the world. All week, I’ve thought of the image of Cecil welcoming everyone into Tree of Life Synagogue. He probably welcomed the gunman with a warm smile and offered him a prayer book.
Opinion: Voting in the cradle of democracy

Opinion: Voting in the cradle of democracy

Erin and David Pervis pull out their smartphones to shed some light on their Georgia ballots. We sit at an outdoor table at the Balcony Restaurant having drinks before dinner. The restaurant is atop a building on one of those maze-like streets in Athens’ ancient quarter.
Opinion: Not the best words, the worst words

Opinion: Not the best words, the worst words

As the 2018 midterms wind toward a conclusion, the Republican Party and Donald Trump are choosing not to run a traditional GOP campaign. For example, they have all but ignored those massive tax cuts for corporations that a few months ago were to have served as the center pole of their campaign.
Opinion: Donald Trump is an arsonist of hate

Opinion: Donald Trump is an arsonist of hate

“It’s a terrible, terrible thing, what’s going on with hate in our country, frankly, and all over the world, and something has to be done,” President Trump said in the wake of the tragic synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh that killed 11 Jews.
Opinion: Gulch decision time drawing near?

Opinion: Gulch decision time drawing near?

Red Light/Green Light imagery has been adopted by proponents and opponents of redeveloping Atlanta’s Gulch. Makes sense, as stop or go is the question now before Atlanta city government as it weighs an ambitious project that would create a shiny new neighborhood where none now exists.
Opinion: City should walk away from bad Gulch deal

Opinion: City should walk away from bad Gulch deal

It’s a bad deal. That’s the message the Atlanta City Council is hearing from residents. Since August, Council members have been wrestling with a massive proposed public subsidy for a private Gulch development. Their constituents oppose a deal they see as “bucks for billionaires.
Opinion: Develop Gulch now to benefit city’s future

Opinion: Develop Gulch now to benefit city’s future

For 159 years, the Metro Atlanta Chamber has engaged in civic, community and economic initiatives to help improve the City of Atlanta and our broader region. We have been intimately involved in projects from the 1996 Olympics and Grady Hospital Task Force to increasing transit funding and changing our state flag – each one having significant long-term impact on our region.
Opinion: DeKalb ethics board has done good work

Opinion: DeKalb ethics board has done good work

I have been a resident of Dekalb County for over 25 years and have experienced both the positive and negative of Dekalb County governance. Most of the negativity was attributed to the lack of oversight of the activities of some of the county’s elected and non-elected public officials.
Opinion: The GOP and its pre-existing lie

Opinion: The GOP and its pre-existing lie

Republicans all over the country, from Brian Kemp here in Georgia to Donald Trump up in Washington, claim that they want to make sure that Americans with pre-existing medical conditions can continue to get health insurance. They don’t, and they won’t. And how do Americans know that they don’t and won’t? Because they haven’t.
Opinion: Walls can’t make the world go away

Opinion: Walls can’t make the world go away

According to Donald Trump, the caravan of migrants walking north from Guatemala toward the United States harbors “unknown Middle Easterners,” who are no doubt intent on committing terrorist outrages of the most dastardly sort upon Americans once they penetrate our inner sanctum.
Opinion: A college initiative behind prison bars

Opinion: A college initiative behind prison bars

Suppose you just left a prison after serving, say, 10 years for armed robbery. Barbed wire, blocks of stone, hulking prison guards and distasteful food that you eat on a timed basis are in your rear-view mirror. You’re feeling a giant sigh of relief, right? Finally a taste of freedom, for sure? Uh … perhaps, not so fast.
Opinion: Stacey Abrams’ response to Kemp’s assertions on voting

Opinion: Stacey Abrams’ response to Kemp’s assertions on voting

Free and fair elections are the bedrock of our American democracy - a lesson I learned from my parents who fought for civil rights. I am proud of the work I’ve done to ensure eligible voters could exercise their constitutional rights. Georgians need affordable healthcare, good-paying jobs, and quality public schools.
Opinion: Suppressing our own votes

Opinion: Suppressing our own votes

Last week, the news broke that Brian Kemp, both the Secretary of State of Georgia and the Republican nominee for Governor, placed 53,000 voter registration applications on hold, at least 70 percent of which came from black people. The media went crazy. Democrats went crazy. Everyone on Twitter with a blue wave emoji or resistance hashtag went crazy. Voter suppression was all you heard.
Opinion: Game time is now for Ga. voters

Opinion: Game time is now for Ga. voters

There is a scene in the Denzel Washington movie “Remember the Titans” where the newly integrated football team from Alexandria, Virginia, began playing other teams that remained all-white. The viewer is shown the flagrant rule violations that the referees allow from the white team. Washington calls his team into the huddle and exhorts them to keep playing their best.
Opinion: Tax cuts for the rich, Medicare cuts for you

Opinion: Tax cuts for the rich, Medicare cuts for you

Last year, even before President Trump and congressional Republicans celebrated passage of massive corporate tax cuts, U.S. corporate profits after taxes stood at record highs, having almost quadrupled over the previous 20 years. But according to Republicans, corporate America needed and deserved more, more, ever more and more. So they got it.
Opinion: Attacks on voting hit at soul of our democracy

Opinion: Attacks on voting hit at soul of our democracy

Recently, the New Georgia Project, a voting rights organization I chair, was forced to file yet another lawsuit against Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp. A skilled craftsman in the dubious art of voter suppression, Kemp is stalling the voter registrations of some 53,000 Georgians. As shocking as it is, this is just the latest chapter in an old story and, of late, a growing trend in America.
Opinion: Many eyes are on Georgia now

Opinion: Many eyes are on Georgia now

What should be just a normal cycle of election-season mud-slinging is at risk of becoming overshadowed — rightly or wrongly, depending on your side – by the old specter of racial discrimination once predominant in, but never wholly peculiar to, the American South. Senses and sentiments are heightened now, raw-edged on all sides.
Opinion: Kemp, GOP commit voter fraud

Opinion: Kemp, GOP commit voter fraud

Fifty-three-thousand Georgia voters have been placed on “pending” status because data on their voter-registration forms do not match exactly with data in other government databases.
Opinion: Redevelop Gulch today to benefit Atlanta’s future

Opinion: Redevelop Gulch today to benefit Atlanta’s future

For 159 years, the Metro Atlanta Chamber has engaged in civic, community and economic initiatives to help improve the city of Atlanta and our broader region. We have been intimately involved in projects from the 1996 Olympics and Grady Hospital Task Force to increasing transit funding and changing our state flag – each one having significant long-term impact on our region.
Opinion: Apathy shouldn’t be the swing vote

Opinion: Apathy shouldn’t be the swing vote

A few years ago, I joined a gym, wanting to fight middle age with a little more muscle mass and little less weight. I met a friend at 5 a.m. so that I would not let my work and parenting schedule be an excuse for getting in better shape. Knowing she was waiting on me, I did not turn off the alarm and go back to sleep; together, we tackled those miles on the treadmill.
Opinion: Stacey Abrams’ vision, roadmap for Georgia

Opinion: Stacey Abrams’ vision, roadmap for Georgia

As Governor, I will build a Georgia where families and businesses can thrive Georgia has flourished over the past 50 years. Our ports—air and sea—are economic engines that drive commerce and attract new companies. Our state has become a hub for innovation and opportunity. Yet, for too many of our fellow Georgians, the prosperity is a mirage.
Opinion: Brian Kemp’s vision, roadmap for Georgia

Opinion: Brian Kemp’s vision, roadmap for Georgia

Serving in public office was never part of some grand plan. My wife Marty will tell you that running for governor was never mentioned in marriage vows, either. But as a small business guy from Athens, I grew frustrated with big government regulations, paperwork, and high taxes. Some days I spent more time at City Hall than at the job site. I had to do something about it.
Opinion: Two visions for Ga.’s future

Opinion: Two visions for Ga.’s future

Georgia’s slice of the dash toward the November elections is entering the final stretch. Last Tuesday marked the deadline to register to cast a ballot in Georgia on November 6. And on Tuesday, early voting begins in this state. One of the most-closely watched races across Georgia — and the entire nation — is the contest to become Georgia’s next governor.
Opinion: Kavanaugh: Best and brightest, or just brightest

Opinion: Kavanaugh: Best and brightest, or just brightest

When I look at SCOTUS nominations, I always evaluate them based on best and brightest. In other words, is the nominated individual: a.) of exemplar character, and b.) among our smartest? Certainly, Justice Brett Kavanaugh is as smart as anyone who has ever served on the U.S. Supreme Court. But, his character clearly is very suspect. I am not an angel; quite the opposite.
Opinion: The world has changed; the GOP can’t

Opinion: The world has changed; the GOP can’t

At his rallies, Donald Trump is depicting the 2018 midterms as a major referendum on him personally. He also predicts a rising “red wave” that will carry more Republicans into office, driven by a surge of support from women after the Kavanaugh fight.
Opinion: Toward a less-congested ride

Opinion: Toward a less-congested ride

The MARTA Board last Thursday passed a plan that has great potential to increase mobility within the City of Atlanta — and beyond, truth be told. Approval of the More MARTA plan will unleash a projected $2.7 billion for transit improvements within the city limits. That amount is expected to be generated over 40 years from a half-penny sales tax that City of Atlanta voters passed in 2016.
Opinion: Ways to permanent peace on Korean Peninsula

Opinion: Ways to permanent peace on Korean Peninsula

Recently, the Korean Peninsula has been at the center of global attention more than ever. The 3rd Inter-Korean Summit Meeting was held in Pyeongyang on September 18-20. President Moon Jae-in and Chairman Kim Jong Un adopted the historic Pyeongyang Joint Declaration.
Opinion: Melania Trump’s trip spotlights Africa’s progress

Opinion: Melania Trump’s trip spotlights Africa’s progress

Melania Trump is keen to make a difference in the lives of children around the world and noted as much during a speech at the 73rd U.N. General Assembly. In her remarks, she made direct mention of the good work being led by fellow first ladies H.E. Rebecca Akufo-Addo, H.E. Margaret Kenyatta and H.E. Gertrude Mutharika.
Opinion: Trump, our harasser in chief

Opinion: Trump, our harasser in chief

At a political rally this week in Mississippi, the president of the United States of America, the most powerful man in the world, decided that for fun’s sake, it would be a good idea to publicly mock and ridicule a woman with no ability to defend herself against him, accusing her of ruining a good man’s life.
Opinion: Ga. should continue with smart congestion-relief moves

Opinion: Ga. should continue with smart congestion-relief moves

Accommodating one of the fastest growing state populations in the country has been a challenge for Georgia’s transportation system. Due to aging infrastructure, poorly designed mass transit systems, and a low-density suburban population, traffic gridlock and delays are normal occurrences for many north Georgia commuters. As Georgia faces the prospect of 2.
Opinion: MARTA, city milestone will boost mobility

Opinion: MARTA, city milestone will boost mobility

By adopting an expansive portfolio of new rail lines, bus routes, and major transit system improvements, the MARTA Board on Thursday took an historic stride to ensure the city of Atlanta remains strong and is moving forward for decades to come. After more than two years of intensive planning, public outreach, and often-spirited debate, the More MARTA Atlanta program is officially underway.

Opinion: Michelle Obama tells her truth

So now Michelle Obama finally tells her truth. There has always been about her a sense that she did, indeed, have a truth of her own and that it was, if not at odds with the one her husband expressed with high-flown eloquence, more real and more rooted, as befits a girl from the South Side of Chicago.

Opinion: Congressman who believes in what he has lived

WASHINGTON — The world’s oldest political party has developed an aversion to discretion. The Democratic Party is manacled to an over-caffeinated base that believes that deft government can deliver parity of status to everyone while micromanaging the economy’s health care sector, which is larger than all but three other foreign nations’ economies.

Opinion: Democrats are trying to steal an election in Florida

WASHINGTON — Republican Gov. Rick Scott leads Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson by 12,562 votes in the Florida Senate race. A margin of victory that large has never be overturned in a recount. According to FairVote, the average vote shift in statewide general election recounts is a meager 282 votes. Democrats know that recounting the existing votes is unlikely to change the result.

Opinion: White House wall weirdness

Hey, do you think the government will run out of money before Christmas? I know, this seems to come up every year. But until the Trump era, it was generally something vague about Congress passing continuing resolutions. Certainly nothing you could start a fight over during Thanksgiving dinner. But now we’ve got The Wall! Good old Wall.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 16

Nitpicking vote shouldn’t be allowed Stacey Abrams’ campaign wants to stretch the rule of law to suit its needs. Without laws, we don’t have a country, but an anarchy. To ask that the voting rules for citizens be ignored is downright illegal.

Opinion: Macron to Trump: ‘You’re no patriot!’

In a rebuke bordering on national insult Sunday, Emmanuel Macron retorted to Donald Trump’s calling himself a nationalist. “Patriotism is the exact opposite of nationalism; nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism.

Opinion: Will the GOP keep dancing with autocracy?

WASHINGTON — When a national leader urges that votes be ignored or that an election result he doesn’t like might best be set aside, we label him an autocrat or an authoritarian. When it’s President Trump, we shrug. Worse, many in his party go right along with baseless charges of fraud. We are in for a difficult two years.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 15

Conceding gracefully is Abrams’ best move I have been following closely the chaos surrounding the recent election for governor. It seems to me Stacey Abrams’ best path forward is to gracefully concede the race and begin preparing to run for another office, such as senator.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 14

Ballot proposals need more-accurate descriptions All of Georgia’s proposed constitutional amendments passed in landslides.

Opinion: We have an identity problem

According to a recent report in The New York Times, Health and Human Services Department officials have been circulating a proposal to define sex. Their memo says, “Sex means a person’s status as male or female based on immutable biological traits identifiable by or before birth.

Opinion: What Kansas got right

Love or hate him, Kris Kobach is a force to be reckoned with. And reckon with him is what voters in Kansas did in Tuesday’s election. Kobach, whose term as Kansas secretary of state will mercifully expire in the new year, was seeking the governorship and proved too extreme for the voters to retain.

Opinion: A defeat for white identity

Running for president in 2016, Donald Trump sold two kinds of populism. One appealed to white tribalism and xenophobia — starkly in his early embrace of birtherism, recurrently in his exaggerations about immigrant crime, Muslim terrorism and urban voter fraud.

Opinion: Real America versus Senate America

Everyone is delivering post-mortems on Tuesday’s elections, so for what it’s worth, here’s mine: Despite some bitter disappointments and lost ground in the Senate, Democrats won a huge victory.

Opinion: You can’t always get what you want

You can’t always get what you want. So said the philosopher Mick Jagger. He said it in 1969, so obviously, he didn’t intend it as a comment on the 2018 midterms. But progressives might be forgiven for thinking otherwise. After all, they wanted Andrew Gillum to become Florida’s first African-American governor. They didn’t get it.

Opinion: Mississippi underwent a self-rehabilitation

WASHINGTON — In the previous 50 years, the state of Mississippi has validated Lord Tennyson’s belief that “men may rise on stepping-stones of their dead selves to higher things.” Now the state has until Tuesday to explain to the U.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 11

Brookwood H.S. escapade raises larger questions Regarding the Brookwood High School band (“Band performance racial slur had been planned as a prank,” Metro, Nov. 6), when I read about their stunt, I remembered some of the things we used to do as high schoolers. I must say we have become so much more ultra-sensitive today than when I was that age, in the late 1950s.

Opinion: Kavanaugh debacle cost Democrats the Senate

WASHINGTON — Brett Kavanaugh must have been smiling as the returns came in on Election Day, because it is now clear that the Democrats’ campaign to destroy him will go down as a massive blunder. It failed to keep Kavanaugh off the court. It cost Democrats their chance to regain control of the Senate.

Opinion: Trump is a really happy loser

Wow, Jeff Sessions was gone before they finished counting votes in Arizona. Do you think Donald Trump was trying to change the subject? Everybody knew he’d get a new attorney general after the elections, but we deserve to find out who won in Florida before we go back to 24/7 presidential pandemonium.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 9

Trump should protect hunting, conservation on public lands Sportsmen have had high hopes the president and his cabinet would commit to, in President Trump’s words, “honoring the legacy of Theodore Roosevelt.

Opinion: How Trump lost

WASHINGTON — The 2018 elections began the demolition of the Trump coalition. There remains much work to do. The results in some states were disappointing, and President Trump’s grip on the Republican Party was strengthened. But a large majority of Americans rejected the president’s divisive, ethno-nationalist politics.

Opinion: Has Bloomberg Begun the Battle for 2020?

Did former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg just take a page out of the playbook of Sen. Ed Muskie from half a century ago? In his first off-year election in 1970, President Richard Nixon ran a tough attack campaign to hold the 52 House seats the GOP had added in ‘66 and ‘68, and to pick up a few more seats in the Senate.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 8

Throwback page shows off Old South’s proud moments I guess few people read the small print of the AJC page observing the past as reported in the old Atlanta Constitution, but the “Throwback Thursday” page of Nov. 1, reprinting the April 10, 1928 article on the opening ceremony of the unveiling of the Stone Mountain Memorial, was insightful.

Opinion: America has rejected Trumpism

Make no mistake: America has rejected Trumpism. No one seriously expected the Senate to flip, because Democrats had to defend 26 seats in that chamber, compared with only nine held by Republicans. The real battleground was the House, where Democrats had to achieve a net gain of 23 seats to get the 218 needed for a majority. They did.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 7

Liberal media’s Luckovich misreads veterans Does “From the Left” cartoonist Mike Luckovich not see the irony in his Nov. 1 cartoon depicting three elderly World War II veterans? Or was someone else impersonating him that day? The cartoon’s first scene shows three veterans with the caption, “Fought to Save America in World War II.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 6

MARTA police dedicated to system, public safety I’m proud of the MARTA police. Each morning as I drive to the MARTA station, I know I’ll return home at night. The hour will be late, and the train station, while not deserted, will have fewer commuters than in the morning. I know I can count on the security of the police presence, guaranteeing our safety.

Opinion: The luck of the Democrats

One of the interesting features of this election cycle has been the gulf, often vast, between the hysteria of liberals who write about politics for a living and the relative calm of Democrats who practice it. In the leftward reaches of my Twitter feed the hour is late, the end of democracy nigh, the Senate and the Supreme Court illegitimate, and every Trump provocation a potential Reichstag fire....

Opinion: Trump courts votes with questioning of right to citizenship

President Donald Trump, in a pre-midterm snit, is obsessing over his fear of brown babies. It’s not surprising. After all, this is a president who manages to label any group of Latino migrants as “very bad people.” It was only a matter of time before Trump latched on to the fear tactic of immigrants increasing their numbers by giving birth on U.S. soil.

Opinion: The Great Center-Right delusion

What’s driving American politics off a cliff? Racial hatred and the cynicism of politicians willing to exploit it play a central role. But there are other factors.

Opinion: Thinking about anti-Semitism

In the days following the murder rampage at the Tree of Life synagogue, I received several expressions of grief from friends who are committed Christians. One included in her note a verse from John Donne: “No man is an island entire of itself … any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind.

READERS WRITE: NOV. 4

Real, not fake, president would take responsibility The president created this toxic political environment. His rhetoric and lies are fuel for divisiveness and hatred. A real, not fake, president would never spew such venom. A real, not fake, president would never assault the media. A real, not fake, president would not lie habitually to Americans.

Opinion: Trump sets a poisonous tone

Rob Rogers is an editorial cartoonist who was fired in June after 25 years with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. His departure, he said, came after weeks of tension with a publisher who wanted a more pro-Trump stance.

Opinion: Disaster candidates beyond Trump

Perhaps this will go down as The Year Two Indicted Congressmen Ran for Re-election. OK, not necessarily. We do have a lot of other … stuff going on. Still, it’s a moment to remember. We have the insider-trading guy in upstate New York and a California representative who allegedly used campaign contributions for, um, personal matters.

Opinion: No, the president cannot end birthright citizenship

WASHINGTON — In an interview for “Axios on HBO,” President Trump announced he will sign an executive order ending birthright citizenship. When challenged on the constitutionality of doing this by executive order, Trump replied: “You can definitely do it with an act of Congress. But now they’re saying I can do it just with an executive order.
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