Opinion


Opinion: Bringing clarity, history to monumental decisions

As the noisy removal of four Confederate monuments in New Orleans pushes the issue back into national headlines, the Atlanta History Center remains committed to a grassroots conversation about Confederate memorials. 


Vet respects right to protest during anthem

I’m a veteran. Apparently this means that I am supposed to be upset and insulted by the NFL anthem-kneeling trend. Twitter rants and video of fans burning the jerseys of any player that kneels tell me that my service to this nation is denigrated every time a player chooses to kneel during the anthem. I hardly ever stand for the National Anthem anymore. Not because I seek to make a statement...

Opinion: Banning book is bad, misguided move

Atticus Finch came alive for me on the beach a few miles down Highway 90 from Biloxi. So, it kinda struck a nerve when I read last weekend that the Biloxi School District had deleted “To Kill a Mockingbird” from the eighth-grade reading list. This decision, as you can imagine, sparked a firestorm. In my view, this book should be required reading for every literate Southerner. Why would...

Readers Write: Oct. 20

Cheerleaders should be praised for bravery The Kennesaw State cheerleaders who knelt during the national anthem have more courage in their little fingers than all of their critics put together. This has nothing to do with disrespecting the national anthem. It has everything to do with a desperate attempt to wake people up to the injustices of racism in this country. These cheerleaders are more patriotic...

Opinion: Don’t put much faith in new bipartisan health deal

So desperate are some folks to see Congress “do something” about health care that there was much rejoicing Tuesday about the bipartisan deal Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) announced. But even if the deal winds up winning approval from the rest of the Senate and the House, it’s very unlikely to stabilize markets as advertised. The gist of the deal, which...

Readers Write: Oct. 19

Pets also source of distracted driving Much has been written about, discussed and legislated regarding the use of cell phones and other devices while driving in order to reduce the number of accidents, injuries and deaths. This is certainly a worthwhile direction. However, there is another that should also be addressed. Can anyone doubt that a pet, usually a dog, in the lap of a driver would not be...

Trump’s appeal to evangelicals is timely and welcomed

President Trump addressed this year’s annual Values Voters Summit in Washington, D.C. He is the first sitting U.S. president to do so. The Values Voters Summit is hosted by the Family Research Council, an organization whose mission is addressing public policy and culture from a Christian point of view. Its base is largely evangelical Christians, and this is why President Trump deemed it appropriate...

Opinion: The vast, unending emptiness that is ‘Trumpcare’

“Obamacare is finished. It’s dead. It’s gone,” President Trump announced during a Monday Cabinet meeting. “You shouldn’t even mention it; it’s gone. There is no such thing as Obamacare anymore.” Hmmm. Apparently, all that struggle about “repeal and replace” from our GOP-run Congress turned out to be unnecessary. With a few strokes of the...

Readers Write: Oct. 18

Players should not be compared to military I read with some consternation Gracie Bonds Staples’ article, “Do white NFL fans see players as mascots?,” Oct. 8. Much of Staples’ article quoted Erin C. Tarver, an assistant professor of philosophy at the Oxford College of Emory University. I strongly disagree with much of what she said but most of all her comment regarding NFL players...

Readers Write: Oct. 17

Tired of hate directed at Trump There has been nothing but criticism of Donald Trump since he first showed interest in running for president. There have been so many salacious comments, indiscrepancies and nasty talk, not only about him but also his family. I have silently, but begrudgingly, fumed at the disrespect of the first family. However, when we have to be subjected to it daily, you finally...

Readers Write: Oct. 16

Mental afflictions are source of shootings Each public mass shooting triggers a torrent of rapid-fire commentary, political posturing and arguments laced with massive misinformation. One might think the recurring nature of these events would have led to greater accuracy in dealing with their details, but no. Each event’s disjointed aftermath becomes as numbing to the public’s senses as...

Readers Write: Oct. 15

Are Dems really the party of working class? The American public is often told that immigration and the North American Free Trade Agreement benefit Mexicans and Americans, but the AJC article “In Mexico, $2-an-hour workers make $40K SUVs,” Oct. 6, shows that this not the case in the automobile industry. Workers in Mexico are subject to blatantly illegal contracts written by bogus unions...

Opinion: Of law, pardons and executive privilege

On a recent Friday night when the headlines were being dominated by a killer hurricane, Donald Trump quietly used a power of the presidency to pardon a controversial national figure. Is there more where that came from, as the political storm intensifies and dangerously swirls around Trump himself? In the wake of numerous ongoing investigations into the U.S. president, the concept of “executive...
Opinion: Equifax CEO: What I’ve learned in three weeks

Opinion: Equifax CEO: What I’ve learned in three weeks

Since Equifax announced a data breach affecting more than 145 million consumers in September, the public scrutiny on us has been enormous, and the criticism of the company’s response has been extreme. Days after I was appointed interim CEO, I apologized to the public in a column in The Wall Street Journal. I do so again now. We had a massive breach, and we failed to support consumers as well...

Opinion: Commentary on cybersecurity and Equifax breach

Excerpts from former Equifax CEO Rick Smith’s prepared testimony for the U.S. House Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection: “We at Equifax clearly understood that the collection of American consumer information and data carries with it enormous responsibility to protect that data. We did not live up to that responsibility, and I am here today to apologize to the American...

How Equifax can win next battles

I recently took a call from a reporter who was looking for a new angle to the massive Equifax breach. The fact that years ago I worked as Equifax’s senior vice president and international counsel and am now in the cybersecurity industry seemed to hold some allure. Having dispensed with a long list of anticipated questions, there was a follow-up by the reporter: “Can Equifax survive this...
Opinion: Breach demands firm fixes

Opinion: Breach demands firm fixes

It’s a pleasant surprise that the still-unfolding Equifax breach has drawn the ire of politicians on both sides of the aisle. That may be the only pleasing aspect of an epic security lapse that exposed financial and personal data of as many as 145 million Americans. The latest revelation this week indicates info from 10.9 million driver licenses has been hacked too. It’s expected that...

Opinion: Gerrymandering is unseemly, not illegal

Gerrymandering is ugly business; there’s no getting around that. The question pending at the U.S. Supreme Court, and in two federal lawsuits filed in Georgia, is whether judges can impose a remedy that, to borrow from James Madison, is not worse than the disease. As things stand, it doesn’t appear so. Let’s start with the Georgia cases. Plaintiffs say the state House district map...

Opinion: Who best for ATL’s next mayor?

Voters in Atlanta face a problem. A good problem. In this year’s election for mayor, they have the luxury of choosing from more than a half dozen well-qualified, competent and honest candidates. That alone is a sign of maturity for the city, an indication that it is producing quality leadership, in numbers, at a critical moment in its history. The candidates, white and black, have all worked...
Opinion: We make sense of unfolding history

Opinion: We make sense of unfolding history

Between the time you start and finish reading this column, there’s a good chance that some breaking news has come out of Washington, D.C. It might be that President Trump has tweeted something, sending the Washington press corps into a frenzy. Or maybe a Democrat in Congress has shot back at him over a tweet. One of his cabinet members could’ve complained about him. (Inevitably, according...

Readers Write: Oct. 13

So-called ‘war on coal’ never happened The AJC’s article on the EPA director’s intent to override the Clean Power Plan starts with “War on coal is over,” News, Oct. 10. I read the article looking specifically for your refutation of the myth that President Obama initiated any such “war.” The decline of the coal industry began many decades ago as newer...

Opinion: The failings of Harvey Weinstein, and of conservatives

The news about film executive Harvey Weinstein, accused by numerous women of sexual harassment and even assault, is being portrayed in part as a political story. There are a couple of obvious reasons for this. One is he’s a prolific donor and fund-raiser for Democratic candidates and causes, and there’s always a certain amount of “gotcha” by the other side when such a person...

Readers Write: Oct. 12

Confederate flag not part of Kaepernick debate Let’s review the racist rant by the letter-writer of “Where is vitriol for Confederate flag,” Readers Write, Oct. 4. No. 1: Colin Kaepernick has never been banned from anything. No. 2: the protesters did malign the U.S. flag, our country, our veterans and our national anthem. He brings up the Confederate flag which has never been part...

Opinion: Trump taking important step for religious freedom

Arguing for protection of religious freedom, the Trump administration has opened the door for employers to withdraw from the Affordable Care Act mandate requiring them to provide birth control coverage at no cost to employees. Under new rules issued by Department of Health and Human Services, religiously affiliated institutions that find the requirement opposed to their religious principles, or nonreligious...

Weinstein just the latest revealed pig of liberalism

If you are surprised by the news that Harvey Weinstein of Miramax fame, a man well-known for profane tirades and physical altercations, is also the sort of charmer who loafs around seminude while asking subordinates for “back” massages, then you can be surprised by just about anything. Weinstein’s response to The New York Times’ impressive investigatory work was to issue a...

Opinion: A long, ugly political death struggle awaits

By now, we have come to know a few things. We know that it isn’t going to get any better than this, that this heightened state of absurdity can and will be sustained for as long as Donald J. Trump is our president. We know it because we’ve seen it. We’ve seen how Trump feeds off chaos, how he needs something to excite him, validate him, anger or outrage him in every waking moment...

Readers Write: Oct. 11

Let’s see players put game where their mouth is Regarding NFL players “taking the knee” or sitting while the National Anthem is being played — you know what? I get it. They seem to be protesting some level of injustice in the U.S. That said, when does it end? When every injustice in the country is rectified? When we all become clones, believing in the same things and living...

Readers Write: Oct. 10

Columnists shouldn’t speak ill of dead While not a fan of Hugh Hefner, I find the Ross Douthat column disparaging him after his death to be offensive, “Hefner’s flesh-peddling life hardly worth celebrating,” Opinion, Oct. 3. There was a time when speaking ill of the dead was frowned upon and was never done by responsible journalists. My mother used to say “If you can&rsquo...

Readers Write: Oct. 9

Some have more right to life than others A friend of mine, who has TSA pre-screening status, recently had to surrender a jar of rhubarb jam before boarding a flight to Texas, a pistol-packing state. Yet, a guy in Nevada and elsewhere can blithely carry machine guns up to his hotel room. The so-called “greatness” of America is our guarantee of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness...

Opinion: Tillerson was right about Trump

Multiple sources inside the Trump administration have confirmed that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson did indeed call President Trump a “moron” last summer, and that he had to be talked out of resigning. In a hastily called press conference Wednesday, Tillerson was forced to respond to try to keep his job. No, Tillerson said, he had never contemplated resignation. But when given the opportunity...

Readers Write: Oct. 8

Pitts’ chip too big for his shoulders The racial chip Leonard Pitts carries on his liberal shoulder is affecting his judgment, “Irked conservatives trying to put blacks in their ‘place,’” Opinion, Oct. 1. I’m not the only football fan that’s irked when players take advantage of their showbiz notoriety to make a disruptive stand against what they consider police...

Opinion: Society indebted to Columbus, history

A couple of weeks before Labor Day, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio triggered a firestorm by suggesting he might order the removal of Christopher Columbus’ statue from Manhattan’s Columbus Circle. Americans used to celebrate the courage of Columbus and other explorers who courageously set out into the unknown and began the process of introducing Western civilization to this new part...
Opinion: The stages of grieving storm losses

Opinion: The stages of grieving storm losses

The seven stages of flooding. Sometime that afternoon, the first trickle slipped under the door. Our old life ended. Hurricane Irma brought the water from God knows where and filled our swollen marshes at high tide. The marsh channel across the street from our home – called with no irony Scenic Waterway – was dug decades ago to drain water from the island into the marsh. The island has...

Opinion: Better mental health is key to solving more than just mass shootings

The National Rifle Association did something unusual this past week: It endorsed more regulation of firearms. The organization, usually pilloried as the root of all evil after mass shootings like the one in Las Vegas on Oct. 1, asked the federal government to “immediately review” whether bump stocks, which the Las Vegas gunman reportedly used, comply with current law. The NRA said it &ldquo...

Opinion: Hysteria after mass killings is bipartisan affair

In the wake of the Las Vegas shooting, the left immediately clamored for more gun control. I don’t blame them. While I believe those across the political spectrum insensitively politicize these tragedies far too soon, of course there should be a debate about guns after an incident as jarring as the carnage we saw in Las Vegas. It would be unreasonable not to expect that conversation. There should...

Opinion: Science offers a path away from gun violence

I am an NRA member, and I don’t want my children or grandchildren to be shot and killed. Neither do millions of both gun advocates and gun-control proponents. As a nation, we’ve been conditioned to feel we must overwhelm, out-vote, or out-scream those we see as opponents. Our real enemy is neither the right nor the left; neither advocates of gun rights or gun control. The real enemy in...

Opinion: Where to now on gun policy?

The massacre of dozens of concert-goers in Las Vegas has reignited the uniquely American debate over what restrictions on firearms may be appropriate and warranted — or not — in considering the U.S. Constitution’s Second Amendment right to bear arms and its practical effects on society. As we’ve written here multiple times before, the 2nd Amendment guards a broad right to own...

Readers Write: Oct. 6

Trump rhetoric sophomoric and threatening The letter-writer is right on the mark (“Trump’s speech sad reflection,” Readers Write, Sept. 22), indeed, “disgraceful” for the U.N. and the U.S. Domestic hate and divisiveness have now been globalized by our president. While the U.N. Secretary-General earlier urged “statesmanship,” Trump did the opposite with his...

Opinion: How not to ‘politicize’ a tragedy like Las Vegas

Days later, we still don’t have many answers about the gunman in Las Vegas and why he set out to kill dozens and wound hundreds attending a country music festival. But we certainly have moved on to the same argument we always have after mass shootings — or more accurately, the same argument about whether we should even be arguing. Launching straight from a tragedy to a policy debate is...

Readers Write: Oct. 5

U.S. needs to re-examine priorities Once again, Congress has allocated billions upon billions more to our already obscenely bloated “defense” budget, for fighting a pointless and apparently unwinnable war abroad. While our infrastructure is crumbling; while poor children are cruelly lunch-shamed because their parents are behind in payment; while veterans sleep in cardboard boxes, our so-called...
Opinion: Breaking down gerrymandering’s 21st century injustice

Opinion: Breaking down gerrymandering’s 21st century injustice

In June 1964, thousands of people from all walks of life, of every color and creed, men and women, old and young, put their lives on hold and marched south for Freedom Summer. They faced violence, harassment, imprisonment, and sadly even death. Why? Because they wanted to help register African-American citizens to vote. Every single person who put their life on the line then knew, just as we know...

Opinion: Laws, like guns, can be tools for self-defense too

We live in a world in which one old man with no military training, all by his lonesome, can slaughter 59 innocent people and wound more than 500 others. Think about the scale of that, because it’s a higher casualty count than U.S. forces took in an entire week of heavy fighting in retaking the Iraqi city of Fallujah. Yet it happened right here at home, in a matter of mere minutes. We also live...

Opinion: Judge Roy Moore bolsters Republican party credibility

To the dismay of Washington’s Republican Senate leadership, Judge Roy Moore crushed Luther Strange in the runoff for the Republican nomination for the open Senate seat in Alabama, outpolling Strange by 9 percentage points. Senate Republican leadership, and President Trump, stood behind Strange. The Republican establishment doesn’t want their party branded with Moore’s hard-core,...

Readers Write: Oct. 4

Where is vitriol for Confederate flag? The professional players’ protest now joined by NFL owners is not about the flag. From the outset, banned quarterback Colin Kaepernick protested the general mistreatment of America’s non-white citizenry by police and America in general. But since our profane president and others are defending the flag that the protesters have not maligned in any manner...
Opinion: The most important thing to get right about tax reform

Opinion: The most important thing to get right about tax reform

Like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday night, tax reform marches on in Congress. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite) Tax reform is moving forward after the Senate on Thursday approved a budget resolution authorizing up to $1.5 trillion in new deficits over the next 10 years. This leaves a number of people uneasy about the nation’s ...
Opinion: The GOP’s elder statesmen speak up

Opinion: The GOP’s elder statesmen speak up

(AP) In recent days, we’ve seen Republican senators Bob Corker and John McCain and now former President George W. Bush speak out eloquently about the direction in which President Trump is attempting to steer this nation. Yet another prominent Republican, former presidential nominee Mitt Romney, has also spoken passionately against the divisiveness and tolerance of bigotry...
Opinion: Trump and Gold Star families

Opinion: Trump and Gold Star families

(AP) Let me offer a few words in defense of President Trump — at least up to a point. The president has argued, strenuously, that he had been respectful, polite and appropriate in a condolence call this week with the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson, one of four U.S. soldiers killed two weeks ago in Niger. A Democratic congresswoman who overheard the call says that to the...

Opinion: Is war with Iran now inevitable?

With his declaration Friday that the Iran nuclear deal is not in the national interest, President Donald Trump may have put us on the road to war with Iran. Indeed, it is easier to see the collisions that are coming than to see how we get off this road before the shooting starts. After “de-certifying” the nuclear agreement, signed by all five permanent members of the Security Council,...

COMMENTARY: Reformers: Be ready when your time comes

Reformers are by nature impatient. But historically their victories have come from long, sustained efforts that began in periods when conservatives were dominant. Many aspects of Franklin Roosevelt’s program were first advanced during the administrations of Calvin Coolidge and Herbert Hoover. They reached fruition when the political atmosphere changed. In his book on the great progressive Fiorello...
Opinion: Take from the sick and old, give to the rich

Opinion: Take from the sick and old, give to the rich

David Koch (AP) The Republican budget resolution that the Senate is expected to approve this week cuts $475 billion out of Medicare for seniors over the next decade and cuts another $1 trillion out of Medicaid.¹ Both steps are highly unpopular with voters, which is why you don’t hear Republicans bragging about their actions. In a poll taken by the Kaiser Family Foundation...
Opinion: Bipartisan health deal won’t cure what ails Obamacare

Opinion: Bipartisan health deal won’t cure what ails Obamacare

Sens. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) confer during a Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 6. (Pete Marovich / The New York Times) We still need to see more details, but there’s a pretty good chance the bipartisan health deal announced Tuesday by Sens. Lamar Alexander...

Opinion: Trump’s scary strategy on North Korea

On just the first day of a war between the United States and North Korea, according to a Stanford University assessment, 1 million people could be killed. Yet after my five-day visit to North Korea with three New York Times colleagues, such a nuclear war seems terrifyingly imaginable. In the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, it was clear that President Donald Trump’s threat to “totally...
Opinion: When the right to choose is stripped away ….

Opinion: When the right to choose is stripped away ….

(AP) If you want to know where this is headed, if you want a glimpse of what the future may hold if things aren’t turned around politically, take a look at what is happening to pregnant, undocumented teenagers being held in government-funded refugee shelters down in Texas. According to Politico, several of the pregnant girls have decided against bringing a child into...
Opinion: The sheer nothingness that is ‘Trumpcare’

Opinion: The sheer nothingness that is ‘Trumpcare’

(AP) “Obamacare is finished. It’s dead. It’s gone,” President Trump announced during a Monday Cabinet meeting. “You shouldn’t even mention it; it’s gone. There is no such thing as Obamacare anymore.” Hmmm. Apparently, all that talk of “repeal and replace” from our GOP-run Congress turned out to be unnecessary. With a few ...
Opinion: The difficult realities of outlawing partisan gerrymandering

Opinion: The difficult realities of outlawing partisan gerrymandering

DeKalb County voters go to the polls in Scottdale, May 24, 2016. (AJC Photo / Hyosub Shin) Gerrymandering is ugly business; there’s no getting around that. The question pending at the U.S. Supreme Court, and in two federal lawsuits filed in Georgia , is whether judges can impose a remedy that, to borrow from James...

Opinion: ‘Scalia Speaks’ a collection that teaches about civility

I knew the late Justice Antonin Scalia a little, and like millions of others, I was an avid fan of his jurisprudence, the great bulk of which he produced after I was no longer a law student, so much the worse for me. Reading opinions as a law student was often like trying to swallow great bowls of sawdust — without milk. Very few judges can write well. On the rare occasions when I came across...

Opinion: Auto industry has glamorous past but opaque future

DETROIT — Bending metal, slapping on chrome and marketing an empowering product and status marker that mesmerized 20th-century America, the automobile industry typified the Old Economy, of which General Motors was emblematic. As was its bankruptcy. Today, GM’s CEO Mary Barra is wagering that the industry soon will be manufacturing New Economy products. They will incorporate technologies...

Opinion: GOP is finally, sorta, willing to admit the obvious

Yes, he’s childish and incompetent. Is that really news by now? But of course, it wasn’t that assessment of Failed President Trump that made jaws drop over the weekend so much as it was the person making it. Meaning Sen. Bob Corker, who unleashed an extraordinary barrage of contempt on Twitter and in a New York Times interview. The Tennessee Republican referred to the White House as an...
Opinion: The real fallout from Trump ending these health subsidies

Opinion: The real fallout from Trump ending these health subsidies

This group might be reconvened to talk about health reform after the president’s latest move. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci) It’s an odd spectacle to see Democrats attacking a proper implementation of Obamacare that is projected to reduce health costs for many consumers and soon lead more people to have insurance. But that’s what’s happening after the Trump administration&rsquo...
Opinion: Who best as Atlanta’s next mayor?

Opinion: Who best as Atlanta’s next mayor?

(AJC) Voters in Atlanta face a problem. A good problem. In this year’s election for mayor, they have the luxury of choosing from more than a half dozen well-qualified, competent and honest candidates. That alone is a sign of maturity for the city, an indication that it is producing quality leadership, in numbers, at a critical...
Opinion: Who lost the culture war? The side that didn’t fight

Opinion: Who lost the culture war? The side that didn’t fight

In this Nov. 23, 2011 file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein appears during an interview in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (AP Photo / John Carucci, File) The news about film executive Harvey Weinstein, accused by numerous women of sexual harassment and...

COMMENTARY: Heading back to the days the Birchers

“Some people say I’m extreme,” an Indiana tea party leader told The New York Times at the height of the movement’s rebellion in 2010, “but they said the John Birch Society was extreme, too.” Uh-huh. The society, which still exists, enjoyed its heyday in the early 1960s and saw Communists everywhere. Robert Welch, its founder, even cast President Dwight Eisenhower...

Opinion: Trump embraces the culture war

To attend the Indianapolis Colts game where the number of the legendary Peyton Manning was to be retired, Vice President Mike Pence, a former governor of Indiana, flew back from Las Vegas. With him in the stadium was wife Karen. In honor of Manning, she wore a No. 18 jersey as “The Star Spangled Banner” began. The Pences stood, hands over hearts. A dozen San Francisco 49ers took a knee...
Bannon to GOP: Surrender, or die

Bannon to GOP: Surrender, or die

(AP) Acting like a barbarian leader outside the city gates — which he pretty much is — Steve Bannon this week gave the Republican establishment an ultimatum: Surrender, or die. “We are declaring war on the Republican establishment that does not back the agenda that Donald Trump ran on,” Bannon told Sean Hannity. “Corker, McConnell, Corker and the...

Opinion: Inside N. Korea, and feeling the drums of war

PYONGYANG, North Korea — To fly into North Korea on an old Russian aircraft is to step into an alternate universe, one in which “the Supreme Leader” defeats craven U.S. imperialists, in which triplets are taken from parents to be raised by the state, in which nuclear war is imminent but survivable — and in which there is zero sympathy for U.S. detainees like Otto Warmbier....
Opinion: ‘ … a different and diminished country’

Opinion: ‘ … a different and diminished country’

(AP) By now, we have come to know a few things. We know that it isn’t going to get any better than this, that this heightened state of absurdity can and will be sustained for as long as Donald J. Trump is our president. We know it because we’ve seen it. We’ve seen how Trump feeds off chaos, how he needs something to excite him, validate him, anger or outrage...
Opinion: Another sign Democrats have moved farther from the middle

Opinion: Another sign Democrats have moved farther from the middle

If you think the other side has been moving away from the middle, you’re right. No matter which side you’re on. But you’re a little more right if you think that’s true about Democrats. That’s the big takeaway from a new survey by the Pew Research Center, which takes a periodic look at partisanship on various issues. The survey...
Opinion: The most bizarre era in U.S. history

Opinion: The most bizarre era in U.S. history

(AP) In covering the most bizarre era in American history, dominated by the most bizarre personality in American history, it is important not to be seduced into experiencing the world as Donald Trump experiences it, as a haphazard series of momentary distractions. Because once you enter his world, you lose the sense of perspective and rationality needed to understand just ...
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