Opinion


Opinion: How to fuel economic trouble

Once upon a time, Georgia had politicians who were generally wise enough to not let election-season antics act against economic development. They understood that “wisdom” and “moderation” comprise two of three words in the state motto. That season of common sense is gone, it seems. Nothing proves this moreso than the recent boneheaded and corrosive actions to punish Delta Air...


Opinion: Enabling next-gen transportation fixes

In an age when histrionics — and not action — too-often hog the public spotlight, it’s most encouraging that the Georgia General Assembly has recently made significant headway toward improving the state’s transportation systems. That is a great victory for pragmatism and politics as the art of the possible at a time, nationally, when discordant sound seems to triumph too often...

Opinion: We all have role in Earth Day

Today is the 47th anniversary of Earth Day, a movement launched in 1970 to raise our consciousness about environmental concerns regarding issues such as pollution and public health. For more than four decades it has been an opportunity for personal and corporate accountability – a time when we not simply reflect on our carbon footprint, but take action to do better for the sake of generations...

Opinion: Moving forward on regional transit in metro Atlanta

A few weeks ago, the Georgia General Assembly passed landmark legislation creating a regional transit authority in metro Atlanta. Skeptics believed it couldn’t be done, saying the issue was too complicated, our state and region too divided. But I had faith that these obstacles could be overcome. Indeed, through the many months spent shepherding this bill through the state Legislature, I was...

Opinion: Unwise to unleash dogs of war

As sabers rattle ever louder across fields, plains, oceans and deserts, President Trump’s words from earlier this year haunt the stable mind: “I would love to be able to bring back our country into a great form of unity,” he said. “Without a major event where people pull together, that’s hard to do. But I would like to do it without that major event because usually that...

Opinion: The fatal vanity of James Comey

James Comey loves the spotlight. The spotlight does not love him back. In the harsh glare of the spotlight, you begin to see that it has never been enough for Comey to strive to be honest and ethical. You begin to see that his Achilles heel, his Kryptonite, is that he needs to see that image of himself reflected back to him by others, that he needs to be recognized by others to be honest and ethical...
Opinion: Zell Miller, a great statesman and U.S. Marine

Opinion: Zell Miller, a great statesman and U.S. Marine

Because I was born at Ft. Benning, grew up in Columbus and graduated from the University of Georgia, I always had an affinity for the state of Georgia during my 18 years of service as a Senator from Texas. One of my dearest friends and strongest allies was Georgia Senator Paul Coverdell. His voice was squeaky but he had the heart of a lion and his memory will always be very close to my heart. When...

Opinion: GOP speakers have short lifespan

“You all know that I did not seek this job,” House Speaker Paul Ryan reminded the country in announcing his retirement. “I took it reluctantly.” Three years ago, Ryan had indeed been adamant, refusing to drink from the poisoned chalice of becoming a GOP speaker. He relented, but only after being begged to do so by fellow Republicans, who told him that party loyalty and patriotism...
Opinion: Israel’s 70th anniversary worth world’s reflection

Opinion: Israel’s 70th anniversary worth world’s reflection

My mother’s first glimpse of Israel was on an early spring day in 1950 as the ship that took her from Italy got closer to the Promised Land. Her eyes teared as she viewed for the first time Mount Carmel and the port city of Haifa below, with an Israeli Star Of David flag wavering in the light breeze. Years later, she relived that moment as she held my father’s hand and said in Hungarian...
Opinion: 100 days of progress, and some challenges

Opinion: 100 days of progress, and some challenges

As the 60th Mayor of Atlanta, I am committed to enhancing our international status as a global city whose diversity is its biggest asset. In my first 100 days in office, my administration has moved with urgency to fulfill campaign pledges around critical issues that matter the most to our residents: affordability, education, equity, public safety, mobility and transparency. We agreed to transfer 51...
Opinion: 2018 is a big political year. Count on us to guide you through it.

Opinion: 2018 is a big political year. Count on us to guide you through it.

If you follow politics, then you know that 2018 is a pivotal, potentially historic election cycle in Georgia. Consider the stakes. We will elect a new governor to replace the term-limited Nathan Deal, along with seven other statewide executive offices. Every seat in the Georgia General Assembly is on the ballot. That means 56 state Senate seats and 180 seats in the Georgia House will be up for grabs...
Opinion: Religious freedom law would be good for Amazon and Ga.

Opinion: Religious freedom law would be good for Amazon and Ga.

As Amazon continues to deliberate on its new HQ2 location, it’s worth reflecting on the disingenuous argument coming from many on the left that a state-level Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is bad for business. While making their claim, critics fail to mention that Bill Clinton signed the federal RFRA into law in 1993. They also ignore the success of dozens of other RFRA states - including...

Opinion: The Founding Fathers v. Donald J. Trump

“It’s an attack on our country, in a true sense,” President Trump said Monday, sitting in the White House Cabinet room surrounded by generals and admirals. “It’s an attack on what we all stand for.” The president was not describing the well-documented attempt by Russia to interfere with our 2016 elections — he has never used words anywhere near that strong...

Opinion: Does Ga. want a Ten Commandments governor?

In 2001, Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore arranged for a 5,500-pound Ten Commandments monument to be installed in the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court building. The monument – on state land, in a state building – sent a clear message to anyone entering the building that having the right kind of religion might affect justice. It also sent a message to many people that they were not welcome...
Micro schools bring new approach to educational needs

Micro schools bring new approach to educational needs

Like many parents today, I have mixed feelings about the future and how my children will adapt to the continuous changes. Technology is certainly leading the way, and high-tech companies like Amazon, Facebook and Google are considering bringing thousands of jobs to metro Atlanta. A traditional education, however, may not necessarily prepare our children for new careers in today’s society. My...

Opinion: MLK, ideals should not remain ‘safely dead’

On April 9th, we will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the funeral of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., famed co-pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church and the greatest civil rights leader of the 2oth century. That day, throngs of people from across the country and around the world packed into the small sanctuary of Ebenezer church and into the streets, as the 39-year-old preacher, who transformed the whole...

Opinion: MLK’s legacy of changed hearts, minds

People know you are a major historical figure when you are identified with just the letters representing your name. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is one of those historical personalities known simply as MLK. MLK is a benchmark in our history because he led a movement that changed hearts and minds about the promise of our Founders. Namely, “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are...

Opinion: Finding lessons from a life well-lived

A man who changed the world was our own. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was a son of the South in general, and Atlanta in particular. Much of the nation and world observed, and even mourns still, his passing from this earth 50 years ago last week. Murdered by an assassin’s bullet, King’s death — and life — are well worth the solemn remembrance accorded the sad occasion in recent...

Opinion: King’s last days still have lesson for us all

The shot that echoed in the Memphis dusk 50 years ago still reverberates through our national life, yet there is so much about the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. we find hard to absorb. In our long effort to moderate King, to make him safe, we have forgotten how unpopular he had become by 1968. In his last years, King was harassed, dismissed and often saddened. These years after Selma are often dealt...

Opinion: Our current populist movement’s about more than the economy

In his latest book, “Anti-Pluralism: The Populist Threat to Liberal Democracy,” William Galston of the Brookings Institution wrote: “When I began writing about the travails of liberal democracy a few years ago, I believed economics represented the heart of the matter.” Everyone bought into the democratic system so long as prosperity was increasingly and widely shared. However...

Opinion: Assessing past predictions made here

A week has passed since April Fool’s Day, so this is no joke: This is my last column for the AJC. It was not quite nine years ago I began, a Georgia native returning home. It was a great adventure, one that alternately exhilarated and humbled me. On Monday I’ll start a new adventure, as head of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, a think tank dedicated to free markets and limited government...
Opinion: Recalling an Atlantan who changed the world

Opinion: Recalling an Atlantan who changed the world

The scene was extraordinary. A crush of people, as far as the eye could see, gathered along the streets between Ebenezer Baptist Church and Morehouse College. Most were dressed in their Sunday best. The crowd was quiet, respectful and solemn. Some had climbed trees or street poles for a better view. Along the street progressed a mule-drawn wagon, transporting a man who had fought for the dignity and...
Opinion: Repeat after me: Charter schools are public schools

Opinion: Repeat after me: Charter schools are public schools

Charter schools are public schools. Charter schools are public schools. Charter schools are public schools. Forgive the repetition, but for a lot of people this simple fact doesn’t seem to be sinking in. The legislative session that ended last week saw a number of policy fights, but the most surprising, and disappointing, might have been the one waged over a bill to bring state charter schools...

Opinion: These kids could tutor world leaders

NDONGA, Central African Republic — This remote village doesn’t have an official school, and there’s no functioning government to build one. So the villagers, desperate to improve their children’s lives, used branches and leaves to construct their own dirt-floor schoolhouse. It has no electricity, windows or desks, and it doesn’t keep out rain or beetles, but it does imbue...
Opinion: Stormy Daniels proving equal match for Trump’s bombast

Opinion: Stormy Daniels proving equal match for Trump’s bombast

Those who say the Stormy Daniels interview March 25 on “60 Minutes” contained nothing new missed the historical importance of what they were viewing: How Daniels has become President Donald Trump’s kryptonite. Throughout his political rise we have seen former reality TV star Trump use every available form of threat, insult, lawsuit and bombast to silence his opponents and frighten...
Opinion: Public records belong to public

Opinion: Public records belong to public

A couple of weeks ago, two agents from the Georgia Bureau of Investigation showed up at the AJC’s offices. It was the next step in an important investigation. They came to interview a pair of our reporters. But those reporters hadn’t done anything wrong — in fact, I’d argue they’d done some things that you’d see as honorable and important. Let me explain. Investigative...
Opinion: Growth, patience pay off for conservative governance

Opinion: Growth, patience pay off for conservative governance

Legislators passed scores of bills this year, as usual. But the 2018 session, which ended just after midnight Thursday, will be remembered best for three seemingly contradictory fiscal measures. The state’s reserves remained on track to hit $2.5 billion by year’s end. K-12 public schools were fully funded for — depending on who you ask — either the first time since 2002 or...
Opinion: Treating pain while discouraging addiction

Opinion: Treating pain while discouraging addiction

The nation, and Georgia, continue to struggle with a crisis of abuse of the class of painkillers known as opioids. It’s a sign of the severity of the problem that “opioids” is now a household name, even though many who’re aware of the moniker likely know little about them. Awareness, sadly, is likely increasing as more families and people come to be afflicted by this public...

Opinion: Fight against opioids can start with teens taking stand

The Bubonic Plague. The influenza pandemic. The HIV/AIDS epidemic. When I’ve learned in school about these diseases that affected millions of people, I’ve also learned about the incredible responses societies had: communities banded to educate their members about risks and provide resources and support in an effort to wipe out diseases that were killing people. Now we have another epidemic...

Opinion: Treating those in pain while fighting opioid abuse

The opioid (narcotic) epidemic is a topic of national conversation and concern. While it is a conversation we as a country need to have, it is also important to focus on treating addiction and abuse in a way that still allows for the treatment of patients with legitimate chronic pain. According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, 25.3 million adults suffer from chronic...

Opinion: Education can help solve Ga., U.S. drug problem

Meet Johnathan, a 34-year-old male from rural Georgia recently treated for back pain as a result of some extra contractor work he took on over the holidays. We see patients like him every 15 minutes, which doesn’t leave much time to get beyond Johnathan’s chief complaint. He leaves with his first prescription for opioids. Opioid overdose is now the leading cause of accidental deaths in...
Opinion: Georgia will miss Gov. Deal

Opinion: Georgia will miss Gov. Deal

On the whole, Nathan Deal has been a good governor. Admittedly, those are words that I did not think I’d write seven and a half years ago, in large part because of the ethical baggage that Deal brought to Atlanta from his time in Congress. Those concerns were real — indeed, the biggest black mark of Deal’s tenure as governor remains his decision to push out employees of the state...
Opinion: On Zell Miller as a model for Georgia

Opinion: On Zell Miller as a model for Georgia

An outpouring of sympathy and respect from those he fought with and against, and from many others who never even met him. A visitation by a trio of former presidents, only one of whom was from his state and only two of whom belonged to his political party. An occasion for reflection on Georgia, and Georgians’ lives, both before and after he made his imprint on it, and them. This is what the...

Opinion: Zell Miller, a man out of time

Zell Miller always struck me as a man trapped in an era not his own, and his efforts both personally and politically to reconcile the tug of the past with hope for the future accounted for much that made him fascinating to Georgians and to those of us who were lucky enough to cover him. That conflict was all the more poignant and symbolic because as Miller rose to statewide and then national prominence...
50 years after his death, it’s time to talk about King

50 years after his death, it’s time to talk about King

Dear subscribers, I’m the furthest thing from a salesman. But I know this: Thursday night was a powerful argument in favor of subscribing to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Why? Well, if you were among the AJC subscribers gathered at the Atlanta History Center you got a treat. The AJC, along with our reporting partners Channel 2 Action News and WSB Radio, hosted an intimate, poignant discussion...

Opinion: Track and deport will keep Georgians safe

Tackling illegal immigration and protecting Georgia families from criminal aliens is a fundamental component of my campaign for governor. When I announced my candidacy in March of 2017, I told a standing-room-only crowd at the Cobb County Republican Party headquarters that it was time to draw a clear line in the sand on illegal immigration. “This is Georgia,” I said, “and we are...

Opinion: Pence — Trump’s making Ga., America great again

When I visit Atlanta Friday – my second time in the Peach State in just the past week – I’ll bring a message to all the good people of Georgia. The American economy is booming, and we’re just getting started. Since Day One of our administration, President Trump has been fighting to rev the engine of our national prosperity and restore hope to the forgotten men and women of...

Opinion: Putin has Trump’s number

If Donald Trump had to choose a favorite word to describe himself, my bet would be on the word “tough.” In a recent speech to describe his approach to drug abuse, he used a version of “tough” 19 times. He’s tough on trade, tough on the media, tough on porn stars, tough on immigration. Suspected terrorists should be tortured; drug pushers should be executed. No matter...

Opinion: Pension problem demands a new approach

The dog that didn’t bark under the Gold Dome this year — and hasn’t in some time — is pension reform for the state’s teachers. Oh, it whimpered a bit: There was even a bill to eliminate automatic cost-of-living increases for retirees. But it was clear all along the bill wasn’t intended as a serious proposal but more as a shot across the bow. Unfortunately, that&rsquo...

Opinion: Supporters of sanctuary cities endanger Americans, police

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Trump administration are going about the sanctuary city issue in the right way. The very idea of so-called sanctuary cities is offensive to a lot of law-abiding Americans. Taking action against the liberal politicians who want to give safe harbor to illegal immigrants is a slow, easy pitch from the Democrats, and Republicans everywhere should take advantage...

Opinion: Varied viewpoints on immigration

Forceful arguments continue to be made by both sides about U.S. immigration problems and the need for reform, even as lawmakers continue to punt on opportunities to act toward that goal. In the latest episodic twist, a federal spending bill passed Thursday by the U.S. House of Representatives lacked a fix for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, aka DACA. That leaves intact a status...

Opinion: The Bible commands us to care for Dreamers

Immigration has been in the headlines almost every day recently, with many strong opinions about how to address “Dreamers,” the roughly 800,000 young people across the nation — including roughly 25,000 here in Georgia—who have benefited from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. After the Trump administration announced that the program would be rescinded...

Opinion: ‘Dreamer’ collegians embody America’s promise

In the large conference room at Oglethorpe, as late afternoon sunrays turn the room golden, I find myself sitting around a long table on Thursday with our college dean, one of our counselors, and a dozen students who have shown up to talk about the threat to DACA (immigration Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) and what it might mean in their already uncertain lives. One young woman trembles with...

READERS WRITE: MAR. 22

Reform needed on teacher retirement system After pumping nearly $600 million into the Teachers’ Retirement System (TRS), the Legislature wants to “do pension fixes ‘at some point’” (“Ga. lawmakers say teacher pensions need fixing, just not now,” Politically Georgia, March 4). Great. A few years ago, the National Council on Teacher Quality gave TRS a grade...
Opinion: Senate shouldn’t sunset valuable education program

Opinion: Senate shouldn’t sunset valuable education program

It’s that time of year, when we see what new excuse legislators will conjure to stymie one of the state’s most popular educational programs. Georgia’s tax-credit scholarship program helps more than 13,000 students each year attend the private school of their choice. Donors to scholarship organizations get a dollar-for-dollar state tax credit, and the credits, limited to $58 million...

Opinion: Foes of renewable energy increase risk of climate catastrophe

Peter Thiel, Facebook investor and Donald Trump supporter, is by all accounts a terrible person. He did, however, come up with one classic line about the disappointments of modern technology: “We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters.” OK, now it’s 280, but who’s counting? The point of his quip was that while we’ve found ever more clever ways of pushing around...

Opinion: ‘Little Pink House’ speaks truth to power

Coming soon to a cinema near you — you can make this happen; read on — is a bite-your-nails true-story thriller featuring heroes, villains and a history-making struggle over … the Constitution’s Takings Clause. Next Feb. 24, “Little Pink House” will win the Oscar for best picture if Hollywood’s political preening contains even a scintilla of sincerity about...

READERS WRITE: APR. 22

Left’s gender-neutral society will be weird I’m getting a glimpse of what a gender-neutral society is going to look like. Spurred on by leftist social scientists and a troop of useful idiots (of both sexes), that society is beginning to unfold. As I recently read an article, I came across the term “theybies.” It means babies devoid of any gender stereotyping to avoid those...

Opinion: What happened in Starbucks isn’t really about Starbucks

I don’t drink coffee, so I can’t boycott Starbucks. But I wouldn’t if I could. Yes, I understand — and share — the national anger over viral video of last week’s arrest of two African-American men at one of the company’s Philadelphia stores. The men, who have yet to be identified, were reportedly doing nothing more threatening than waiting quietly to be joined...

Opinion: Trump’s Syria strike was meant to project strength

WASHINGTON — In 2013, after Syrian dictator Bashar Assad crossed President Obama’s red line and used chemical weapons on innocent civilians, a U.S. official told the Los Angeles Times that Obama’s retaliatory strike would likely be “just muscular enough not to get mocked” but not so devastating that it would elicit a response from Iran and Russia. In the end, Obama backed...

Opinion: Our gold-leaf presidency

Let’s talk for a minute about Mar-a-Lago. Donald Trump was there this week, hosting a get-together with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan. Important stuff to be discussed — North Korea, trade. The two men held a brief press conference on Tuesday, at which the president revealed: “Many of the world’s great leaders request to come to Mar-a-Lago and Palm Beach. They like it;...

READERS WRITE: APR. 20

Universal health care would be best for U.S. Regarding an April 13 letter, physicians, who expect (and usually get) the most respect and the highest medical incomes, need to come out and admit that the answer to our expensive but ineffective system is universal health care. I am sure many of their RN’s would join them. They know how sorry the system is. The doctors know, but they have learned...

Opinion: Nikki Haley’s SOS to the nation

WASHINGTON — “With all due respect, I don’t get confused.” These eight words from Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, will go down as among the most powerful indictments of the rancid governing culture President Trump has fostered. They may also shed light on one of the great mysteries of the moment: Why is it that Trump regularly backs off when it comes...

Opinion: Trump — prisoner of the War Party?

“Ten days ago, President Trump was saying ‘the United States should withdraw from Syria.’ We convinced him it was necessary to stay.” Thus boasted French President Emmanuel Macron Saturday, adding, “We convinced him it was necessary to stay for the long term.” Is the U.S. indeed in the Syrian civil war “for the long term”? If so, who made that fateful...

READERS WRITE: APR. 19

Solar power not a cure-all for state’s energy needs Regarding “Georgia Power launches new solar partnership with corporations” (AJC.com, April 12), perhaps the author should back up the notion that renewable energy is “cost effective.” Is Google, situated in Atlanta, going to pay less per kilowatt-hour for solar electricity produced in Camilla rather than fossil-fuel...

Opinion: Choosing animals over people

BAYANGA, Central African Republic — The cutest primates on earth may be Inguka and Inganda, gorilla toddler twins who playfully tumble over each other here in the vast Dzanga Sangha rain forest, one of the best places to see gorillas, antelopes and elephants play. The only risk: They are so heedless and unafraid of people that they may tumble almost into your lap — and then their 375-pound...

READERS WRITE: APR. 18

Comey more likely election influence than Russians Accusations of Russia interference in the presidential election are a forgone conclusion, if you believe the Left. It is not a question of “if it did it occur,” but only by whom in their 100 percent-convinced minds. Well, over a year into unprecedented levels of investigations by government committees, FBI directors, media sources and...

Opinion: A mayor’s most important job

When World War II ended, Washington D.C.’s population was about 900,000; today it’s about 700,000. In 1950, Baltimore’s population was almost 950,000; today it’s around 614,000. Detroit’s 1950 population was close to 1.85 million; today it’s down to 673,000. Camden, New Jersey’s 1950 population was nearly 125,000. A similar story of population decline can...

READERS WRITE: APR. 17

MLK’s legacy, work well worth recent acclaim In a recent letter to the editor (Readers Write, April 12), a reader expressed his aggravation and disappointment that the AJC covered the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s assassination and funeral. He argued that King is not worthy of such recognition. He is dead wrong. Rarely in the course of human events does someone emerge who epitomizes...

Opinion: Testimony reveals truths about sex assault victims

By now, anyone with a prurient taste for political scandal has read the investigative report engulfing Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens. It’s 24 pages of testimony describing a series of sexual assaults Greitens allegedly committed before he became governor — a far cry from the “affair” the married governor has admitted to. The report was released Wednesday by a special investigative...

Opinion: Don’t rush to impeach Trump

A few days ago, which is to say an eternity in our Trump-dilated time, there was a story on NPR about anxious evangelicals’ seeking a meeting with the president. The subject of their agita, not entirely surprisingly, was the Stormy Daniels affair, in which the president’s lawyer-fixer, Michael Cohen, appears to have averted a possible October surprise by buying the silence of a porn star...

Opinion: Obamacare’s very stable genius

Front pages continue, understandably, to be dominated by the roughly 130,000 scandals currently afflicting the Trump administration. But polls suggest that the reek of corruption, intense as it is, isn’t likely to dominate the midterm elections. The biggest issue on voters’ minds appears, instead, to be health care. If Republicans retain control of both houses of Congress, we can safely...

Opinion: The meaning of Ryan’s departure

I’ve always felt a kinship with Paul Ryan. Maybe it’s the fact that we are both Jack Kemp acolytes. Maybe I have a soft spot for upright family men who are attracted to public policy by the desire to do good. Maybe I love conservative wonks. But Paul Ryan’s fate over the past several years is as good an indication as any of how far our politics have fallen. Ryan’s departure...

READERS WRITE: APR. 15

Violent religious intolerance not only an ISIS tenet Having studied many different religions worldwide, I became curious. Is there any religion that is not guilty of premeditated murder of non-believers? I know ISIS is the most recent incarnation of religious intolerance. But historically, aren’t all major religions guilty of such violence somewhere in their pasts? I’ve always been amazed...

Opinion: Shaun King might be controversial, but he’s no terrorist

Shaun King is a controversial guy. As an activist and journalist, he’s been prominent in the Black Lives Matter movement, defended the Palestinians and attacked the Republican Party. On Monday, apparently as a result of his politics, King was briefly detained at JFK Airport by an agent of U.S. Customs and Border Protection while returning home from Egypt. In a series of tweets and a telephone...

Opinion: How should America respond to Syria’s use of chemical weapons?

On April 22, 1915, chlorine gas, wafted by favorable breezes, drifted from German lines toward enemy positions held by French troops near Ypres, Belgium. This was the first significant use of chemical weapons in a war in which 100,000 tons of chemical agents would be used by both sides to kill almost 30,000 soldiers and injure 500,000. The injured would include a German corporal whose voice, bearing...

OPINION: Republicans and Democrats just did something big together

Washington seems to be in the grip of hyperpartisan gridlock these days. Important bills are passed on party-line votes (when they are passed at all) and the investigative committees of Congress appear to be sideshows, unable to agree on basic facts. Many Americans despair that Republicans and Democrats seem incapable of coming together to do anything important. Take heart — the two parties...

OPINION: ‘I’m sorry for the Facebook unpleasantness. Well, kinda, sorta’

Rejected first draft of Mark Zuckerberg’s belated apology for the mass data invasion that affected at least 50 million Facebook users: To all devoted members of the worldwide Facebook family, I want to say how sorry I am that some of your personal information got mined, tracked and re-deployed by Cambridge Analytica (and God knows who else) during the last U.S. election cycle. Most CEOs would...

READERS WRITE: APR. 13

Gun restrictions not all bad; neither is NRA I agree that our rifles don’t need bump-stocks, we should limit the number of rounds a magazine can hold, and we should do more and better background checks. However, this current bunch of young ones seems to want to just do away with the NRA and all it stands for. I just re-read Tom Brokaw’s book covering the sacrifice in blood, sweat and tears...

READERS WRITE: APR. 12

Recent coverage of MLK greatly appreciated Thanks, AJC, for your coverage of the 50th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. I also noticed an unsettling parallel between 1968 and what is happening now. In 1968, Atlanta Constitution Editor Ralph McGill recognized that too many white men were enslaved by their hatred and fear and to their own “sense of inferiority...

Opinion: How to win an argument about guns

Tragically, predictably, infuriatingly, we’re again mourning a shooting — this time at YouTube’s headquarters — even as the drive for gun safety legislation has stalled in Washington. Polls show that nine out of 10 Americans favor basic steps like universal background checks before gun purchases, but the exceptions are the president and a majority in Congress. Usually pundits...

READERS WRITE: APR. 11

Left-wing bias still easily seen on AJC pages I think you should re-title your second-page news segment “Today’s Explainer – From the Left,” or maybe at least move it to the Editorial Page. The last two that I have read, one a leftist view of the census question about nationality status, and the other a leftist view of the new tax law, make no attempt to report legitimate opposing...

Opinion: Black political power means zilch

It’s often thought to be beyond question that black political power is necessary for economic power and enhanced socio-economic welfare. That’s an idea that lends itself to testing and analysis. Between 1970 and 2012, the number of black elected officials rose from fewer than 1,500 to more than 10,000. Plus, a black man was elected to the presidency twice. Jason Riley, a fellow at the...

READERS WRITE: APR. 10

Medical marijuana poses unregulated risk to state’s kids Jim Galloway praises State Rep. Allen Peake for his efforts to bring medical marijuana, in the form of CBD oil, to Georgians (“Peake describes a semi-secret life,” Metro, April 1). Unfortunately, the legislation that Peake got passed over the past three legislative sessions puts Georgia’s children at risk. Physicians...

Opinion: Boomers keep tight grip on American culture

The remarkable ratings success of the rebooted “Roseanne,” a show that last aired when I was 17 years old but commanded a larger audience in its return than any sitcom now on network television, has unleashed a thousand takes about the show’s political significance. Who’s going to win “Roseanne” voters in 2018? Can Hollywood entertain Trump country without betraying...

Opinion: When $63M doesn’t buy working toilets

When 450 students arrived at Anacostia High School in the District of Columbia’s southeast neighborhood on April 4, they found that few of the sinks or toilets were functioning and the cafeteria was flooded. They were advised by the Department of General Services to use the facilities at a middle school two blocks away until repairs could be completed. Exasperated teachers organized an impromptu...

Opinion: What’s the matter with Trumpland?

These days almost everyone has the (justified) sense that America is coming apart at the seams. But this isn’t a new story, or just about politics. Things have been falling apart on multiple fronts since the 1970s: Political polarization has marched side by side with economic polarization, as income inequality has soared. And both political and economic polarization have a strong geographic...
More Opinion Stories