Opinion


Opinion: Times change, our mission does not

The Book of Proverbs speaks to the estimable value of a good name. Seen in that light, there are sound reasons why Henry Grady and Ralph McGill are household names across metro Atlanta, Georgia and, really, the entire nation. Their work, and that of the newspaper they boldly represented – The Atlanta Constitution – has stood the test of time. The Constitution, long-ago combined into today&rsquo...


READERS WRITE: AUG. 10

Seeing through liberal scribe’s faux praise of GOP pols As I began to read Jay Bookman’s column, “As primary runoffs showed, GOP tends to eat its own” (Opinion, Aug. 1), I had to check the byline to see if it really was “From the Left.” Approximately the first one-third of the column was praising Republicans Casey Cagle and David Shafer! However, it turns out that...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 9

Parents should stress fleeing police has consequences I have to ask myself, how stupid can some people be? I constantly see stories about people being confronted by police and often running from them. In some cases, the perpetrators get shot. And the person shot, or their families, act like the perpetrator has done no wrong. Do you really expect the police to let you go, just because you run? If that...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 8

Collegians need to know there’s no free lunch I am amused at students who demand a free college education but fail to understand that free isn’t really free. Do they really think they will receive a “Bulldog Nation” or “Auburn Tiger” type of education with all the bells and whistles? Based on the German “free college system,” which some claim as their...

Opinion: This is on us, America

The Bible tells us the story about two women who both claimed to be mothers of a single child, with King Solomon asked to decide custody. In his wisdom, Solomon demands a sword, announcing that out of fairness he will have to slice the baby in two and give each woman half. One woman then begs him to stop, telling Solomon that she would rather give up the child than see him killed. The second woman...
Opinion: A.G. Sessions’ use of bad data gains political points at Ga.’s expense

Opinion: A.G. Sessions’ use of bad data gains political points at Ga.’s expense

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has clearly spent too much time in Washington. In front of our state’s prosecutors recently, Sessions willfully ignored the progress Georgia has made in criminal justice reform and instead wants us to go back to the failed policies that wasted millions of taxpayer dollars and failed to keep our communities safe. Sessions wrongly implied that reforms in Georgia...

Opinion: Liberating insidious ‘enemy’ in our nation

JOHANNESBURG — “A man who takes away another man’s freedom is a prisoner of hatred, he is locked behind the bars of prejudice and narrow mindedness. I am not truly free if I am taking away someone else’s freedom, just as surely as I am not free when my freedom is taken from me.” Nelson Mandela — whose centenary was celebrated July 18 — wrote these words in...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 5

Federal court’s ruling in line with common sense The 11th U.S. Circuit Court’s ruling that Title VII of the Civil Rights Law does not create a protected class for gays and lesbians is in keeping with the law and common sense (“Court rules gays, lesbians not protected,” News, July 20). The law protects people with immutable characteristics from discrimination. A black person...

Opinion: Kavanaugh likely to be pro-employer jurist

As confirmation hearings approach for Judge Brett Kavanaugh, picked by President Donald Trump to fill the vacant seat on the Supreme Court bench, Georgia companies may be wondering what they might expect in terms of workplace law cases if he is confirmed by the Senate. While one is never certain how a Supreme Court justice will vote until he or she is seated and hearing arguments, Kavanaugh will probably...
Opinion: Exploring our broken immigration system

Opinion: Exploring our broken immigration system

U.S. immigration policy and its effects on this nation, and really the world, continues to be a subject of daily headlines. Immigration problems remain a policy issue with broad implications for most all of us, even those who don’t live anywhere near U.S. border checkpoints. Immigration is also a controversial, divisive issue, we realize. And that’s a good part of why it’s eluded...

Opinion: Misleading arguments fuel anti-immigration push

President Trump ascended to the American presidency on campaign promises that focused on stopping illegal immigration. Like predecessors Barack Obama and George W. Bush, he adopted hard-line immigration policies. It just so happens that Trump’s immigration policies are far more encroaching on migration. Arguments have been made by all political classes justifying or challenging the administration&rsquo...

Opinion: Lack of consequences worsens immigration issue

Among the least talked about scandals in Washington is how immigration officials spent decades misleading Congress about the number of migrants evading court. In advancing this decades long effort, no accounting trick and no false narrative was out of bounds. Never in any year did these officials tell the real story of a court system in crisis. Brave rhetoric and bleached numbers consistently camouflaged...

Opinion: Our daughter was victim of broken immigration system

It was 10 years at the end of July since our daughter Elizabeth Bowie was brutally murdered. Her killer still roams free in Mexico. There appears to be no sign of ever apprehending and bringing him to justice. Here we are 10 years later with our country embroiled in a discussion over border security and what to do with illegal aliens moving throughout our country. We go back and forth over whether...
Opinion: Anti-LGBTQ legislation must be opposed

Opinion: Anti-LGBTQ legislation must be opposed

Those of us who are Southerners, either by birth or choice, must speak up about so-called “religious freedom” laws that seem to be popular among a few far-right state legislators. These laws are misnamed. In fact, they are “right to discriminate according to sexual orientation” laws. They are the 2018 equivalent of the pre-civil rights era segregation statutes. And, someday...
Opinion: Why Trump can never unite U.S.

Opinion: Why Trump can never unite U.S.

If there is one thing on which Americans today can possibly agree, it is that we as a nation are more deeply divided politically than at any time in decades – possibly even since the Civil War. The primary cause of this great divide is President Donald J. Trump and our polar-opposite perceptions of who he is. Where one side sees a strong leader, the other side sees a crude bully. Where one side...

Opinion: The GOP eats its own

Politics is a mean business, as Casey Cagle and David Shafer can attest. The two Georgia Republicans have spent most of their adult lives building resumes, reputations and relationships, carefully preparing for the opportunity to step into the most powerful offices in the state. They shook the hands, smiled the smiles, went to the meetings, fought the fights, said the words and toed the lines. But...
Opinion: Getting smart on solar is a plus for communities

Opinion: Getting smart on solar is a plus for communities

Atlanta is transitioning to 100 percent clean energy. A solar module manufacturing facility is set to open in Dalton. Facebook and Walton Electric Membership Corp. are pairing up to power a 150-megawatt data center in Newton with solar. And every other week a Georgia county like Columbia approves a new solar farm. Many are shocked to learn Georgia is a top solar producer. Hearing about all these projects...
OPINION: Building trustworthy voting system in Georgia is critical

OPINION: Building trustworthy voting system in Georgia is critical

On today’s main Editorial page in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, we take a closer look at the state’s efforts to ensure a trustworthy voting system. The Secure, Accessible and Fair Elections Commission was established for that very purpose, and the name of the group says it all. The Editorial Board’s Opinion makes clear: Georgia’s new SAFE Commission should live up...
Opinion: Build a voting system worthy of trust

Opinion: Build a voting system worthy of trust

Unlike some ill-fitting governmental acronyms, in this case, the name really says it all: SAFE. As in Georgia’s new Secure, Accessible and Fair Elections Commission. Established by Secretary of State Brian Kemp, the SAFE Commission is charged with one of the most important tasks in a democracy — recommending a voting apparatus that will ensure Georgia’s election are just what the...

Opinion: Replace Ga.’s risky touchscreen voting machines

As the 2016 cyber-attacks on U.S. elections continue unabated this election year, most everyone agrees that Georgia’s aging, insecure voting machines must be replaced with a new system to increase public confidence. Georgia legislators tried this spring to authorize purchase of a new system, but the flawed legislation failed. That’s a good thing. It would have made the situation worse...

Opinion: Don’t repeat voting-system mistakes of Ga.’s past

Members of Georgia’s Secure, Accessible and Fair Elections (SAFE) Commission met this summer to evaluate the various options for replacing the state’s current voting machines. The public is weighing in, and some have advocated for a switch back to a strictly paper-only voting system, as in a system where the voter doesn’t use any sort of voting machine to actually cast their vote...
AJC food writers remember Jonathan Gold

AJC food writers remember Jonathan Gold

“The idea of celebrating the glorious mosaic of the city on someone else’s dime was completely fun and completely, exactly what I wanted to do,” says LA Times restaurant critic Jonathan Gold in “City of Gold.” The 2015 documentary brings to life Gold’s insatiable curiosity for food, his quirky personality and sometimes-unconventional work processes. Last weekend...
Opinion: When trade skirmishes hit home

Opinion: When trade skirmishes hit home

On Friday’s front page of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, reporters Tamar Hallerman, our Washington correspondent, and Michael Kanell, a business reporter based here, wrote about Ironmonger Brewing Co., a Marietta-based company. Co-owner David Sheets worries about a trade war. Why? Tariffs on aluminum and steel might drive up the cost of the cans the company uses. “If we get a tariff...
Opinion: Gen Z’s superpower should be voting in large no.’s

Opinion: Gen Z’s superpower should be voting in large no.’s

Generation Z, those born between 1996 and 2010, now hold a power so great, they can change the future if they chose to harness it. I experienced this power on May 22, 2018, when Georgia held its primary election for the gubernatorial race in November. This was a special day for me, as it was also the day of my high school graduation, so I made sure to cast my ballot early in the morning. When arriving...

Opinion: Fewer resources, less ‘common good’ fueling U.S. mental health crisis

With every school shooting, celebrity suicide, and aggressive police encounter, we hear the common cry, “Get them to mental health!” While there is good reason to worry about the mental illness of our nation as the country becomes more fragmented and polarized, in the cost-driven marketplace of 2018, the public mental health system has collapsed. What happened? How did it disappear? &ldquo...

Opinion: LINK trip opened local eyes on need for affordable housing

Metro Atlanta has a well-earned reputation for being the economic engine of the Southeast, and a big factor driving that growth is our region’s affordability. This competitive advantage, however, is in danger of eroding as housing costs rise. Consider these numbers from a recent report prepared by the Bleakly Advisory Group for the Urban Land Institute’s Atlanta District Council: ...

Opinion: Cruising toward a lost civility

PRINCE RUPERT, Canada – America, you could use a cruise. This thought comes to me as I sit with my family talking lazily over seafood chowder and pizza on the restaurant deck overlooking a pretty harbor here. Bald eagles fish between the sailboats and fishing boats moored below us. Our gleaming white cruise ship, the Seven Seas Mariner, is docked a five-minute walk away. Pity the poor server...
Opinion: Heading toward better mobility

Opinion: Heading toward better mobility

The substantial heft of something whole can sometimes be hidden in and around its various parts. That’s an illuminating way to assess transit efforts at this point in metro Atlanta. It efficiently sweeps in public policy as well as pieces undertaken by local, county and state government to improve the speed and ease at which we can move around this big, congested region. The tally of active...

Opinion: The truth is not in him

After his summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, Donald Trump held a rally in Minnesota in which he reveled in his alleged success. Among other things, he told the crowd, “We got back our great fallen heroes, the remains, in fact today already 200 have been sent back.” The date was June 20, and what Trump told America and the families of the fallen that day was a lie. It remains...

Opinion: Bus rapid transit is right path for Atlanta region

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal’s Bus Rapid Transit plan for SR 400 is a breath of fresh air amid stale and misguided transit proposals for the metro Atlanta region. Unlike Atlanta’s costly, failing, fixed-rail Streetcar system – which MARTA plans to expand – Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) vehicles have the appealing appearance of light-rail cars but have rubber tires and travel on roads...

Opinion: Mobility, collaboration can pave way to state’s prosperity

Public transit is the talk of the town. Watching the Governor, Speaker of the House, and Lieutenant Governor – flanked by a truly diverse and bipartisan group of state and local leaders - was heartening to witness, as they announced an unprecedented multimillion-dollar investment in MARTA a few weeks ago. This announcement, which followed other major transit victories/investments in Clayton...

Opinion: Cagle explains our goober-natorial primary

Georgia’s 2018 Republican gubernatorial primary might better be described as goober-natorial. With its absence of policy discussion and cartoonish ads, it has been an embarrassment to the state, to the Georgia Republican Party and to those participating in it. Then again, I’m just a liberal columnist for those lying Atlanta newspapers, to quote the famous phrase. Of course I’m going...
Opinion: The quest for Amazon’s HQ2 continues

Opinion: The quest for Amazon’s HQ2 continues

Metro Atlanta remains in the running as a finalist for Amazon’s second headquarters. The hubbub over potentially landing “HQ”2 and the up to 50,000 high-paying jobs it could bring here remains a super-tantalizing business prospect for this region. On today’s page, we offer a trio of commentary pieces (see links below) centered on the run for Amazon. One writer explores...

Opinion: Amazon win wouldn’t hurt city’s efforts on affordability, equity

Atlanta is unique among the cities listed as finalists for Amazon’s HQ2. For starters, we have the busiest airport in the world, the economic engine of the region that would dovetail nicely with Amazon’s delivery component. But we have many other cards to play. We are famous for our legacy of progressive diversity. We also have an unrivaled working relationship with our business community...

Opinion: Pursue Amazon HQ2 with care for interests of all Atlantans

Atlanta is among 20 finalists in the Olympian race for Amazon’s second headquarters, or HQ2. Civic stakeholders and economic developers are making the case for HQ2 in places like the Gulch downtown or the Aerotropolis redevelopment near Hartsfield-Jackson Airport. The region’s leaders are imagining where to house and how to transport the 50,000-plus jobs that HQ2 will create. Gov. Nathan...

Opinion: Students lobbying for Atlanta as ideal home of Amazon HQ2

Dear Amazon: We are writing to you on behalf of the over 600 students from 12 universities across Georgia who are excited and prepared to welcome Amazon’s HQ2 to Atlanta. We are Emory University students who came together to launch the #WhyAtlanta campaign because we believe Atlanta is the best location for your HQ2. We know that after multiple rounds of city visits you have collected a tremendous...

Opinion: We have no strategy on trade

Donald Trump is right about this much: China’s approach to free trade is unfair to the point of being predatory, especially on issues such as intellectual property and its refusal to let foreign companies compete fairly in the Chinese market. That said, however, Trump has so thoroughly botched efforts to address those and other issues that progress on these fronts has become almost impossible...

Opinion: Remember what unites us as Americans

It begins with words that ought to be familiar to every American, regardless of political creed, the opening words to what has become our mutual heritage: “When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws...
Opinion: Reflecting on duty, violence and values

Opinion: Reflecting on duty, violence and values

On Thursday afternoon last week, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution newsroom staff gathered for one of its honored rituals. Two of our colleagues were retiring. And we were in the middle of the newsroom to send them off with gifts, memorable stories, tears – and, of course, plenty of food. David Gibson and Rhonda Cook each spent decades at the AJC. Gibson was known as one of our sharpest editors...

Opinion: The time of choosing is now here

If you want to understand how Donald Trump sees himself and his place in the world, he’s quite willing to tell you. It’s one of the few topics on which his word can be trusted. For example, when news broke this week that 81-year-old Anthony Kennedy had finally decided to retire after 30 years of service on the U.S. Supreme Court, potentially altering the court for a generation, here&rsquo...

Opinion: Unrest’s part of unending march toward a more-perfect union

This column appeared in the July 4, 1968 combined edition of The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution. “I turned to neither book nor pamphlet while writing the Declaration (of Independence,” wrote Thomas Jefferson. The principles and language of John Locke’s “Second treatise of Government” and of Locke’s “Essay on Human Understanding” were so...

Opinion: Doubling down on democracy, freedom in midst of war

This Editorial appeared in The Atlanta Constitution July 4, 1943. It is peculiarly fitting that in this year, 1943, the Fourth of July, Independence Day, should fall on a Sunday. It is highly significant that our people, in vast majority, plan celebration of that day by rededication in the present fight for freedom and in the continuing struggle for a more perfect democracy. Such a rededication is...

Opinion: Freedom, liberty are an ever-evolving ideal

The approach of July 4th naturally brings forth concepts of liberty and the struggle to give it form via a new nation representing that Spirit of ‘76. The precepts and history that gave birth to these United States of America are worth reflection this holiday week and beyond. One point sometimes obscured by everyday life is that strife and protest — and even upheaval at times — are...

Opinion: Boosting philanthropy’s reach, power

For many, the U.S. economy is hitting the mark: unemployment is at its lowest level since before the Great Recession, inflation is stable, and the economic expansion that began in 2009 is poised to become the second-longest period of economic growth in our nation’s history. Here in Atlanta, our regional economy is booming. Thousands of new jobs, tens of thousands of new residents, and a diverse...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 15

Far-Left bias taints columnist’s opinion on Russian meddling Imagine an entire editorial about Russian meddling in U.S. politics without once mentioning Hillary Clinton, millions of dollars from Russians “donated” to the Clinton Foundation, and 20 percent of the then-U.S. uranium production licenses being transferred to Russian ownership during Hillary’s secretary of state...

Opinion: Action must be taken to address black community’s problems

During the weekend of Aug. 4-5 (and the preceding Friday night), 12 Chicagoans were shot dead, and 62 others were shot and wounded, the Chicago Tribune reported. Before last week’s mayhem, 1,718 Chicagoans had been shot since the beginning of the year, and 306 had been murdered. Adding to this tragedy is the fact that Chicago’s clearance rate is less than 15 percent. That means that in...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 14

Strict registration, not tech, is key to honest elections The notion of returning to paper election ballots as the end-all method of securing our elections is nonsense (“Georgia moves to replace voting machines,” Metro, Aug 10). Any machine designed and built to process voter input can be corrupted. Securing the integrity of our elections begins with maintaining accurate, current voter...

Opinion: ‘BlacKkKlansman’ holds a mirror to America’s deepest problem

The credits were rolling, Spike Lee’s latest offering to cinema, the Cannes Film Festival sensation “BlacKkKlansman,” was concluding in a Midwestern premiere. A man seated next to him leaned over to Lee’s co-writer Kevin Willmott with a confession, followed by a denial. “I voted for Donald Trump,” he said. There was a pause, as others within earshot at the small...

Opinion: Oh, the Humanities!

In the spring of 1946, W.H. Auden came to Harvard to read a poem to the university’s Phi Beta Kappa chapter. Titled “Under Which Lyre: A Reactionary Tract for the Times,” the poem envisioned a postwar world in which, the war-god Ares having quit the field, public life would be dominated by a renewed contest between “the sons of Hermes” and “Apollo’s children&rdquo...

Opinion: Stop calling Trump a populist

Message to those in the news media who keep calling Donald Trump a “populist:” I do not think that word means what you think it means. It’s true that Trump still, on occasion, poses as someone who champions the interests of ordinary working Americans against those of the elite. And I guess there’s a sense in which his embrace of white nationalism gives voice to ordinary Americans...

Opinion: Summertime is puppy time

“Have any big plans for the summer?” people sometimes ask by way of small talk. I reply literally: “Yes, housetraining a new puppy.” Our newest family member is a 12-week-old Labrador retriever mix — jet black from the top of his nose to the tip of his slightly odd long tail. When I phoned the local vet to make his first appointment, the receptionist asked his age (he...

Opinion: ‘Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him’

“Nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him.” So says Carolyn Bryant Donham in historian Timothy B. Tyson’s 2017 book, “The Blood of Emmett Till.” You keep hoping for more, hoping to hear her wrestle with her crime, explain how she could have done what she did — and how she lives with herself now. But in the end, the admission is all she gives...

Opinion: Portland progressives: So much to protest, so little time

“The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” — L.P. Hartley WASHINGTON — They do things differently in Portland, but not because it is a foreign country, although many Americans might wish it were: At this moment, it is one national embarrassment too many. Rather, the tumults in Portland, which is a petri dish of progressivism, perhaps reveal something...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 12

America should transcend tribalistic tendencies Pat Buchanan’s column, “Peoples, nations fighting commands of democracy” (Opinion, Aug. 3) misses an opportunity to speak with clarity about one of today’s major issues: tribalism. Tribalism is as old as the human race. Since we declared our independence in 1776, America has defined itself by an ideal – a proposition &ndash...

Opinion: The Democrats’ rhetoric is just as dangerous as Trump’s

WASHINGTON — This week a New York man, Carlos Bayon, was arrested after leaving threatening messages for House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and Conference Chairman Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., promising to go after their families and “feed them lead.” When police raided his home, they found 200 rounds of ammunition as well receipts for an assault rifle and handgun and...

Opinion: Building a Trump-free barbecue

Our issue for today is: topics to be banned at weekend barbecues. Or, maybe for the entire month of August. Do you want to take a vacation from politics? From any mention of the word “collusion?” From all discussions about the prospects for the Senate election in North Dakota? My old pal Arthur Brooks argues that people need at least two weeks of politics cleanse. (“Think of it as...

Opinion: Listening to history’s echoes

WASHINGTON — How do democratic countries get to the point where they give up on self-rule? Under what circumstances do demagogues capture large audiences through irrational, emotional appeals unmoored from fact, logic or morality? When do politicians responsible for maintaining a democratic system surrender to dictators? These questions are more pertinent to us in the early 21st century than...

Opinion: Are globalists plotting a counter-revolution?

On meeting with the EU’s Jean-Claude Juncker last month, Donald Trump tweeted: “Both the U.S. and the E.U. drop all Tariffs, Barriers and Subsidies! That would finally be Free Market and Fair Trade.” Did Larry Kudlow somehow get access to Trump’s phone? We know not. But, on hearing this, Steve Forbes, Stephen Moore and Arthur Laffer broke into the “Hallelujah” chorus...

Opinion: Colleges — A force for evil

Many of the nation’s colleges have become a force for evil and a focal point for the destruction of traditional American values. The threat to our future lies in the fact that today’s college students are tomorrow’s teachers, professors, judges, attorneys, legislators and policymakers. A recent Brookings Institution poll suggests that nearly half of college students believe that...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 7

Dems always promise far more than they deliver Well before the 2016 elections, the Democrat Party was drifting toward becoming more politically left-wing, bordering on socialism. Trump supporters saw Hillary Clinton continuing the failed policies Obama initiated during his presidency. The people didn’t want government-mandated health care or more of the oppressive rules and regulation that eroded...

Opinion: Waiting for Caesar

In the eight years of the Obama presidency, there were three cycles of policymaking. First came the attempt to pass an ambitious liberal agenda through a Democratic-controlled Congress, which ended with the Republican House takeover in 2010. Then came the attempt to strike bargains, grand and otherwise, with John Boehner and congressional Republicans, which petered out early in Barack Obama&rsquo...

Opinion: Plastic gun blueprints are out there; guns will follow

It’s not often that I find myself in agreement with Dana Loesch, spokesperson for the National Rifle Association. But on one crucial aspect of 3D-printed guns, she’s right: Pandora’s box has been opened. The blueprints are circulating. Loesch is probably much happier about that than I am. Her organization has fought tooth and nail to stop any regulation of firearms. The new 3D-printed...

Opinion: There’s more than one kind of corruption

When people think of corruption in high places, they tend to think of elites feathering their own nests. Bill and Hillary Clinton monetized political power into a personal fortune of hundreds of millions, and played the system better than any couple since Napoleon and Josephine. Paul Manafort is alleged to have sold his services to sketchy foreign powers (including a Putin puppet in Ukraine), pocketed...

Opinion: How Trump lost re-election in 2020

Last week, my colleague Bret Stephens imagined a news article on the morning after President Donald Trump’s re-election. Today, I imagine a different outcome. In the end, it was a lot simpler than it often seemed. Donald Trump, who spent much of the past four years as a historically unpopular president, lost his bid for re-election Tuesday. His approval rating hasn’t approached 50 percent...

Opinion: A California election could catalyze K-12 improvements

LOS ANGELES — November’s congressional elections will decide which party will control a narcoleptic institution that is uninterested in performing fundamental functions: Only 43 of the 535 House and Senate seats — ten in the Senate, 33 in the House — are occupied by legislators who were serving in 1996, the last time Congress obeyed the law requiring it to pass all appropriations...

Opinion: Trump’s words are weightless

Maybe you remember when Mexico was going to pay for the wall. You should. It was as recently as May. Donald Trump went to Nashville for one of those creepy rallies of his and renewed the vow he made ceaselessly during the 2016 campaign. Mexico, he promised, is “going to pay for the wall” along the U.S. southern border, “and they’re going to enjoy it.” The crowd cheered...

Opinion: Clinton campaign sought dirt on Trump from Russian officials

WASHINGTON — All of Washington is waiting with bated breath to find out whether the Mueller investigation will provide evidence proving that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia. So far, “Exhibit A” against President Trump is the meeting Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner and Paul Manafort had with a group of Russians claiming to have dirt on Hillary Clinton. That meeting should...

Opinion: Afraid? Weak? Egotistical? Attack!

It is simply not healthy for the country to have a president stuck perpetually in attack mode, fighting enemies real and imagined, pushing a toxic agenda that mixes the exaltation of grievance and the grinding of axes. The president’s recent rallies have come to resemble orgies for Donald Trump’s ego, spaces in which he can receive endless, unmeasured adulation and in which the crowds...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 3

Left-wing AJC largely gives Atlanta pols a pass How ridiculous and left-biased of Bill Torpy to call idiot Rep. Jason Spencer’s hijinks “dark” (“Spencer exposes his gullibility – and the darkness of our politics,” Metro, July 26) when the AJC has given so little, perfunctory coverage to the continuing mass of horrid corruption in the Atlanta mayor’s office...

Opinion: Why Trump isn’t fighting the bots

WASHINGTON — Here is the issue raised by Facebook’s revelations this week about disinformation that we need to face squarely: The political interests of the president of the United States coincide with the purposes of foreign forces using social media to divide us along the lines of race and culture. President Trump’s refusal to make combating Russian interference a high priority...

Opinion: Will Tribalism Trump democracy?

On July 19, the Knesset voted to change the nation’s Basic Law. Israel was declared to be, now and forever, the nation-state and national home of the Jewish people. Hebrew is to be the state language. Angry reactions, not only among Israeli Arabs and Jews, came swift. Allan Brownfeld of the American Council for Judaism calls the law a “retreat from democracy” as it restricts the...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 2

Polls inclined to show results purveyors want to see With one day before the election, the AJC printed that the GOP run-off between Cagle and Kemp was “tight” and coming down to the wire. How could you and so many other pollsters be so wrong? With only two people running in an election, a win with a margin of 55-45 is considered a landslide, a huge margin of victory. A 70-30 win is almost...

READERS WRITE: AUG. 1

Left’s hatred for Trump seemingly knows no bounds In recent months, the hatred from the left for the president seems to increase and never decrease. The Left, when I was younger, was opinionated and held views that may not appeal to a conservative, but it never reached the level of hate we see today. Now, the slightest thing will send a liberal into a frenzy. I believe that if President Trump...

Opinion: Some ideas to think about

Poverty is no mystery, and it’s easily avoidable. The poverty line that the Census Bureau used in 2016 for a single person was an income of $12,486 that year. For a two-person household, it was $16,072, and for a four-person household, it was $24,755. To beat those poverty thresholds is fairly simple. Here’s the road map: Complete high school; get a job, any kind of a job; get married...
More Opinion Stories