Trump’s great virtue is he’s willing to win at all costs


After less then 75 days in office, the mainstream media is already writing obituaries for the Trump administration. I don’t know whether to laugh or cry from the absurdity of it all.

Even Juan Williams of Fox News writes. “But it is no liberal fantasy to say the odds of a Trump resignation or impeachment before 2020 are looking better by the day.”

Words are cheap, and I wonder what kind of odds Williams would actually give this ridiculous proposition were he to put some of his own cash on the table.

I prefer to look through the noise and see a president who cannot tolerate losing and as result will incur all costs, and take all action, to ensure that he we will win.

This means taking immediate measure of the situation and changing, as necessary.

I am reminded of a quote from a U.S. Marine, Maj. Lloyd Williams, memorialized in a veterans memorial in in California. When advised by a French Colonel to retreat during a battle in World War I, he said, “Retreat Hell! We just got here!”

After a round of golf with U.S. Sen Rand Paul, a critic of the health care bill that Republicans couldn’t muster the votes to pass, Trump tweeted:

“Anybody (especially Fake News media) who thinks that Repeal and Replace of Obamacare is dead does not know the love and strength in R. Party. … Talks on Repealing and Replacing ObamaCare are going on, and will continue until such time as a deal is hopefully struck.”

Far more important than flailing from left-wing journalists is the sentiment of the American people. And optimism is surging.

Pew Research Center has just released a new survey showing that 58 percent “say the economic situation is very or somewhat good.” This is up from 44 percent from same time last year.

Says Pew, “The 14-percentage-point rise in overall public opinion about the economy since last year is the largest one-year improvement in public sentiment about economic conditions in the history of this survey.”

It’s also the first time since 2007 that positive sentiment about the economy was greater than negative sentiment.

And this surge of optimism about the economy is bipartisan.

Sixty-one percent of Republicans and 60 percent of Democrats say economic conditions are “very or somewhat good,” with the figure for Independents standing at 54 percent.

The stock market, the ultimate bellwether of sentiment, is surging. The Dow Jones Industrial Average stands 25 percent higher today than where it was in February 2016.

Of course, we have a new team in place in Washington and it is reasonable to expect some mistakes. The point is not mistakes, but the focus and commitment to move on.

What is unique today is the combination of a president who will not settle for less than delivering on what he promised and a core group of committed Republicans in Congress who will not settle for less than getting America back on track to its founding principle of freedom.

And health care will be re-addressed and fixed. We have no choice. As President Trump said when the Republican bill was pulled, Obamacare is imploding.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Opinion

READERS WRITE: FEB. 23

Problems at some HBCUs not a surprise I’m disappointed to read about the horrendous graduation rates for so many predominately black colleges (“Perilous times for black colleges,” AJC, Feb 4).The article listed 10 such colleges with six-year graduation rates between five and 17 percent. Unfortunately, it appears that the primary reason...
The left has a right to be happy with redrawn Pennsylvania lines
The left has a right to be happy with redrawn Pennsylvania lines

New district lines drawn in Pennsylvania will make a difference in this fall’s midterm elections. A roundup of editorials Thursday takes a look at the issue. From The National Journal: It boils down to whoever draws the map holds the power. Both parties have benefited, at times, in Pennsylvania. From Bloomberg: Democrats definitely got a boost...
The right has questions about who knew what concerning the Steele dossier
The right has questions about who knew what concerning the Steele dossier

The story about who had a part in the Steele dossier has yet to be fully revealed. A roundup of editorials Thursday takes a look at the issue. From Tom Fitton, president of Judicial Watch: What part did Comey play in the Steele dossier? From Pat Buchanan: Collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russia is something we have yet to see. But we have...
Opinion: Gun control about saving lives, not waging culture wars

WASHINGTON — You have perhaps heard the joke about the liberal who is so open-minded that he can’t even take his own side in an argument. What’s less funny is that on gun control, liberals have been told for years that if they do take their own side in the argument, they will only hurt their cause. Supporters of even modest restrictions...
Opinion: Photo captures Trump's notes for listening session
Opinion: Photo captures Trump's notes for listening session

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump held a worthwhile listening session Wednesday featuring a range of views on how to combat gun violence in schools. And while Trump's at-times-meandering comments about arming teachers will certainly raise eyebrows, for the most part he did listen. Thanks in part, it seems, to a helpful reminder. ...
More Stories