Readers Write: March 21


Trump entitled to dismiss attorneys

Whine, whine, whine. That’s all losers seem to be able to do. The dismissal of 46 Obama-appointed federal prosecutors is being met with cries of outrage (“Abrupt dismissals rile some federal prosecutors,” News, March 13). Yet, I don’t recall any cries of outrage by the mainstream media when Clinton dismissed 93 U.S. attorneys appointed by Bush shortly after his inauguration. That’s standard operating procedure, folks. Every administration has done that for ages. Nothing newsworthy here. We hear similar whining about the Republicans now pushing through appointments with only 51 senatorial votes instead of the traditional 60. Well, the Democrats changed the rules allowing for that but they wanted that rule change to only work for them. If you don’t like the process, change the process for all, not just for one party, and then live with it.

P.D. GOSSAGE, JOHNS CREEK

EPA chief’s comments on CO2 troubling

I was appalled to read the new EPA head, Scott Pruitt, express skepticism over the role of CO2 and other GHGs on our climate (“EPA chief: Carbon dioxide not causing climate change,” News, March 10). The evidence for this is solid and comprehensive. Barring a few perennial contrarians, the scientific community is unified on this. If anything, the forecasts for the impacts have been too conservative. While I still worry how my nieces and nephews will cope in a new world so hostile to life, I fear I too will witness some of the devastation before I leave it.

What is needed at this juncture is not more debate and obfuscation, but decisive actions. Amongst these, we need to implement immediately a revenue-neutral carbon fee that is distributed back to each household.

Climate change is the most serious problem we face as a species, and we simply can’t afford the luxury of re-litigating settled science for the cause of quarterly profits.

TIM WATTS, ATLANTA




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