Readers Write: March 2


No purpose in ‘religious liberty’ bill

Since many citizens of Georgia do not look past the title of the “religious liberty” bill, legislators can trumpet to their constituents about their religiosity and earn their votes. The reality is that it should be titled “Whoopee, We Get to Discriminate Bill;” there is no religion to the bill that Gov. Nathan Deal has vetoed once and, with its resurrection, needs to do again. Senate Bill 233 is the kind of legislation that sends business, sporting events, conventions, etc. to other states because leaders who make decisions about where to locate their activity find such sanctioned discrimination abhorrent and morally wrong. We see clearly the effects on North Carolina’s legislation along these lines: boycotts, relocated sporting events, etc. It seems more like self-sabotage legislation than anything that would serve any constructive purpose. Thank you Gov. Deal for having the continued guts to veto bad legislation.

JOHN SHACKLETON, BROOKHAVEN

Banks not about to get rid of employees

It was interesting to read that some banks are piloting so-called robo-banks (“Bank tellers may be the next blacksmiths,” Business, Feb. 19). Indeed, banks are changing to meet evolving consumer habits, and technology is an important part of the mix. Still, sounding the death knell for well-peopled bank locations is premature.

One size does not fit all. Banking models have not changed so much that most consumers should loop out of a traditional banking relationship altogether. Some banks may offer the opportunity for a client to have a narrow transactional relationship (for instance, having only a checking account at a bank), but most of us look for a fuller banking relationship when it comes time for lending or other more relationship-based consumer financial needs.

BRENT ADAMS, ATLANTA




Next Up in Opinion

READERS WRITE: APR. 25

Medical oversight of cannabis oil would help patients In response to a doctor’s comments on the Georgia CBD Oil Registry (“Medical marijuana poses unregulated risk to state’s kids,” Readers Write, April 10), I can appreciate his concerns about patient safety. I would argue, however, that the law is a much-needed step in the...
Opinion: What if Trump really did ‘shoot someone on 5th Avenue?”

By JESS KIDDEN WASHINGTON — Congressional Republicans and conservative leaders rallied around President Trump Friday, attempting to minimize political damage after Trump shot down a man in the middle of Fifth Avenue in New York City. “I’m not going to put myself in the position of having to respond to every presidential shooting,&rdquo...
Opinion: Educational fraud continues

Earlier this month, the 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress, aka The Nation’s Report Card, was released. It’s not a pretty story. Only 37 percent of 12th-graders tested proficient or better in reading, and only 25 percent did so in math. Among black students, only 17 percent tested proficient or better in reading, and just...
READERS WRITE: APR. 24

Facebook users’ privacy expectations are naive and disingenuous The object of Facebook is to connect members to their “friends,” to provide a format to share and expose the most intimate details of their lives. Facebook members post their photos and videos. They lament about romances. They post recipes and tout products they use and...
Opinion: Paul Ryan is the ultimate party man

The mistake about Paul Ryan, the one that both friends and foes made over the years between his Obama-era ascent and his just-announced departure from the House speakership, was to imagine him as a potential protagonist for our politics, a lead actor in the drama of conservatism, a visionary or a villain poised to put his stamp upon the era. This Ryan-of-the-imagination...
More Stories