Readers Write: July 19


Georgia must address voting system issues

The New York Times in its editorial, “Combating a Real Threat to Election Integrity,” addresses an important issue for Georgians. The article identifies the many and varied ways in which voting machines in many states – and Georgia is one of them – create an uncertain voting environment. It is breathtaking to think that anyone believes voting on machines over 15 years old is satisfactory. No one would entrust any other part of their lives to a computer that old — a computer beyond warranties and not supported by manufacturers. Yet this is only the beginning of the issues that we must address. The list is long: hours or locations making it difficult to vote; mazes of regulations on absentee voting; complex and discriminatory voter registration requirements; training of poll workers; a dangerous lack of security for machines. I am not alleging that any of these were the deciding factor in the outcome of an election, but when combined with the issues the NYT identifies, that day is not far away and it well could be in Georgia. A comprehensive assessment and prioritization of key steps to improve the election system would be a far better expenditure of monies than looking for those rare individuals who voted from the grave.

PINNEY ALLEN, ATLANTA

Voters can’t turn blind eye to risk

I am writing in response to the letter “Electorate must support president” on July 11. The writer is right in that presidents are human and not perfect. They can’t please all the people all of the time. Since she compared some of the “brotherhood” as acting like spoiled children, let me continue with that analogy. Parents love all their children equally. But if one child is behaving in such a way as to risk ruining the family, it is the parents’ responsibility to stop that child. One cannot turn a blind eye and hope that everything turns out OK.

GENE TURNER, ATLANTA




Next Up in Opinion

Opinion: Just saying yes to drug companies

Last week we learned that Novartis, the Swiss drug company, had paid Michael Cohen — Donald Trump’s personal lawyer — $1.2 million for what ended up being a single meeting. Then, on Friday, Trump announced a “plan” to reduce drug prices. Why the scare quotes? Because the “plan” was mostly free of substance...
Opinion: Trump breaks bread, glasses and party at lunch

POTUS coming to Tuesday lunch. Translated, the president of the United States is joining 50 Republican senators in the Capitol to crash their private Tuesday lunch. Nobody is glad to hear this on the Senate side. We love the constitutional separation of powers. The Senate is the last citadel of democracy, they say. We in the press are free as birds...
READERS WRITE: MAY 20

Current pols’ mixing of church and state’s unseemly The flurry of so-called conservative candidates for state offices are now blatantly touting their “Christianity” on their TV commercials. We also have a Democrat candidate mentioning her preacher parents as one of her qualifications for office. There are all kinds of &ldquo...
Opinion: Colleges are uneasy mix of ideology, donor dollars

Thanks to a group of courageous and persistent students, George Mason University was recently forced to acknowledge that it had accepted millions of dollars from billionaire Charles Koch and other conservatives under arrangements that gave the donors input into several appointments at the university’s famously libertarian economics department...
Opinion: Anything is possible in latest round of outrageous events

Once I would have rolled my eyes at a “Homeland” season in which the Russians deftly maneuvered to control whether a Democratic woman, an increasingly paranoid former junior senator from New York, would occupy the Oval Office. Last year, I shook my head at the “Billions” plotline showing a top New York law enforcement official...
More Stories