Readers Write: Feb. 1


Women at march give thanks to men

The world is reflecting on powerful images of the sea of women in pink hats who took to the streets for Women’s Marches across the globe recently. Men marched as well, but many also participated in ways that could not be caught on camera. In our case, we traveled to Washington, D.C. from Atlanta, leaving a total of 10 kids in the capable hands of their fathers. We could not have attended otherwise. While other marching moms depended on sisters, grandmothers, female partners or others to provide childcare, for us men were essential to our ability to attend. Our men happily did the difficult work of parenting because they knew that it was important for us to be on the street. They showed that fathers can be foot soldiers in the feminist movement, even if they aren’t physically marching. These men — and others like them - will not be included in the final attendance tallies, but they should also count as having donned pink hats.

RACHEL BLACHER, BETHANY A. CARUSO, RENA DIAMOND, DABNEY P. EVANS, MAIRA GOYTIA, KAREN LEVY, ATLANTA

Democrats make for sore losers

I notice that liberal/progressive Democrat talking heads, even after Trump’s inauguration, continue to preface all their remarks in the media with the fact that Clinton received the majority of the popular vote, and that makes the legitimacy of Trump’s presidency questionable. That is like a football team claiming they won a game because they gained more total yards than their opponent, even though they failed to score as many points. The Electoral College rules have been in place for a long, long time and the Democrats knew them going in. Being sore losers will not make Trump or his supporters more sympathetic to their agenda. As President Obama never tired of saying “elections have consequences.” Unfortunately for the Democrats, that is still true even when the Republicans win.

LYMAN SMITH, ROSWELL




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