Opinion: That other plot — to bring down Trump

Well over a year after the FBI began investigating “collusion” between the Trump campaign and Vladimir Putin, Special Counsel Robert Mueller has brought in his first major indictment.

Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort has been charged with a series of crimes dating back years, though none is tied directly to President Donald Trump or 2016.

With a leak to CNN that indictments were coming, Mueller’s office stole the weekend headlines. This blanketed the explosive news on a separate front, as the dots began to be connected on a bipartisan plot to bring down Trump that began two years ago.

The narrative begins in October 2015.

Then it was that the Washington Free Beacon, a neocon website, engaged a firm of researchers called Fusion GPS to do deep dirt-diving into Trump’s personal and professional life — and take him out.

A spinoff of Bill Kristol’s The Weekly Standard, the Beacon is run by his son-in-law. And its Daddy Warbucks is the GOP oligarch and hedge fund billionaire Paul Singer.

By May 2016, Trump had routed all rivals and was the certain Republican nominee.

So the Beacon bailed, and Fusion GPS found two new cash cows to finance its dirt-diving — the DNC and the Clinton campaign.

To keep the sordid business at arm’s length, both engaged the party’s law firm of Perkins Coie. Paid $12.4 million by the DNC and Clinton campaign, Perkins used part of this cash hoard to pay Fusion GPS.

Here is where it begins to get interesting.

In June 2016, Fusion GPS engaged a British spy, Christopher Steele, who had headed up the Russia desk at MI6, to ferret out any connections between Trump and Russia.

Steele began contacting old acquaintances in the FSB, the Russian intelligence service. And the Russians began to feed him astonishing dirt on Trump that could, if substantiated, kill his candidacy.

Among the allegations was that Trump had consorted with prostitutes at a Moscow hotel, that the Kremlin was blackmailing him, that there was provable collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Steele’s final product, a 35-page dossier, has been described as full of “unsubstantiated and salacious allegations.”

Steele’s research, however, had also made its way to James Comey’s FBI, which was apparently so taken with it that the bureau considered paying Steele to continue his work.

The questions begin to pile up.

What was the FBI’s relationship with the British spy who was so wired into Russian intelligence?

Did the FBI use the information Steele dug up to expand its own investigation of Russia-Trump “collusion”?

In testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Clinton campaign chair John Podesta and DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz claimed they did not know that Perkins Coie had enlisted Fusion GPA or the British spy to dig up dirt on Trump.

Yet, when Podesta testified, the lawyer sitting beside him in the committee room was Marc Elias of Perkins Coie, who had engaged Fusion GPS and received the fruits of Steele’s undercover work.

Thus we have Free Beacon neocons, never-Trump Republicans, the Hillary Clinton campaign, the DNC, a British spy and comrades in Russian intelligence, and perhaps the FBI, all working with secret money and seedy individuals to destroy a candidate they could not defeat in a free election.

If you wish to know why Americans detest politics and hate the “swamp” that has been made of their capital city, follow this story all the way to its inevitable end. It will be months of unfolding.

Writes for Creators Syndicate.

Reader Comments ...

Next Up in Opinion

Opinion: Pence — Trump’s making Ga., America great again

When I visit Atlanta Friday – my second time in the Peach State in just the past week – I’ll bring a message to all the good people of Georgia. The American economy is booming, and we’re just getting started. Since Day One of our administration, President Trump has been fighting to rev the engine of our national prosperity and...
Opinion: Putin has Trump’s number

If Donald Trump had to choose a favorite word to describe himself, my bet would be on the word “tough.” In a recent speech to describe his approach to drug abuse, he used a version of “tough” 19 times. He’s tough on trade, tough on the media, tough on porn stars, tough on immigration. Suspected terrorists should be tortured...
Opinion: Pension problem demands a new approach

The dog that didn’t bark under the Gold Dome this year — and hasn’t in some time — is pension reform for the state’s teachers. Oh, it whimpered a bit: There was even a bill to eliminate automatic cost-of-living increases for retirees. But it was clear all along the bill wasn’t intended as a serious proposal but more...
Opinion: Supporters of sanctuary cities endanger Americans, police

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Trump administration are going about the sanctuary city issue in the right way. The very idea of so-called sanctuary cities is offensive to a lot of law-abiding Americans. Taking action against the liberal politicians who want to give safe harbor to illegal immigrants is a slow, easy pitch from the Democrats...
Opinion: Varied viewpoints on immigration

Forceful arguments continue to be made by both sides about U.S. immigration problems and the need for reform, even as lawmakers continue to punt on opportunities to act toward that goal. In the latest episodic twist, a federal spending bill passed Thursday by the U.S. House of Representatives lacked a fix for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals...
More Stories