UGA president announces plans to help rural and low-income students


University of Georgia president Jere Morehead announced specific plans Wednesday to help two groups of students - those from rural areas of the state and financially-struggling seniors.

UGA has created the ALL Georgia Program, a five-year, $300,000 privately-funded initiative to offer additional academic and other support to its rural students. Many of them are first-generation college students and some have difficulty adjusting to the university’s academic standards, according to a recent report done by a UGA task force. About 15 percent of UGA students are from rural parts of Georgia and their graduation rate is 10 percentage points lower than other students, the report found.

“It represents another step to ensure that each and every student at the University of Georgia, regardless of background, is set up to be successful in the classroom and in life after graduation,” Morehead said in his annual state of the university address of the ALL Georgia Program.

Several Georgia institutions have proposed efforts recently to help rural students. Georgia Tech in August announced an effort that would help more rural students enroll there. Its Georgia Tech Scholars Program automatically accepts any valedictorian or salutatorian from a public or private high school with more than 50 students. UGA also offers automatic acceptance to Georgia students who graduate at the top of their class.

Morehead also announced the university will establish a pilot program to award grants up to $2,000 to students facing emergency financial hardship. About 200 students struggle to stay at UGA “because they cannot make ends meet,” Morehead said. Some drop out.

“Is there more we can do to help these students graduate? I believe there is,” Morehead said.

The president said the university will spend about $250,000 in private funds for the pilot program.

Georgia State University has a similar program. Last year, about 2,000 students received grants. The average grant was $900.

In other Education news:


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Education

How can schools make their teachers feel valued and supported? 
How can schools make their teachers feel valued and supported? 

A veteran teacher who took a job with Gwinnett attended orientation this week and was thrilled when associate superintendent Linda Anderson announced: “In Gwinnett, there are two types of employees – teachers and those that support teachers.” “It’s been super inspirational,” said the teacher. “That mentality...
Atlanta school board to vote Monday on tax rate
Atlanta school board to vote Monday on tax rate

The Atlanta school board will set the property tax rate Monday, following a third and final public hearing. Atlanta Public Schools administrators recommended the school board reduce the millage rate by 1-mill to 20.74-mills, but some tax payers who attended the first public hearing this week have asked for greater relief in a year where Fulton...
Clayton Schools leader: ‘What we’re doing is creating a culture’
Clayton Schools leader: ‘What we’re doing is creating a culture’

Morcease Beasley paused amid comments on Clayton County Public Schools’ mission, put his hands together and took a more direct turn. “We’ve got to give every child what they need,” said Beasley, beginning his second year as the metro Atlanta school district’s superintendent. Beasley was holding court with journalists...
Study links teen smartphone usage to attention-deficit/hyperactivity
Study links teen smartphone usage to attention-deficit/hyperactivity

As a parent, I’ve seen real differences in my older kids and their friends – now in their late 20s – and my 19-year-old twins and their peers. The chief difference is the level of interaction with the world around them, including friends sitting next to them in a packed minivan. And the cause is the ever-improving smartphone that...
Metro Atlanta students report back to school on these dates
Metro Atlanta students report back to school on these dates

Like an ice cream cone that melts too quickly, summer break is almost over, and school buses and parents — no longer off the grid for vacations — will again squeeze onto Atlanta roadways during rush hour. Most metro area school districts will open their doors in early August, taking in more than 800,000 students, though more than one...
More Stories