Georgia Regents announce areas for new degree program


University System of Georgia Chancellor Steve Wrigley announced Tuesday the first two areas of study for its new “Nexus” degree program: blockchain technology and data analysis.

The Nexus degree, announced in February, is aimed at working directly with leaders in high-demand industries to better prepare students for the workforce.

Students must complete 18 credit hours to complete a Nexus degree, which they will receive in conjunction with their associate, bachelor’s or post-graduate degree. Students must spend at least one-third of those credit hours in an internship or some form of hands-on training. USG officials hope to begin offering Nexus courses as soon as this fall.

Wrigley briefly discussed the areas of study during Tuesday’s Board of Regents meeting.

Blockchain allows information to be stored and exchanged by a network of computers without any central authority. Blockchain technology was initially developed to support Bitcoin, the digital currency that’s used by some as an alternative to traditional banking. 

Some campuses in the USG, such as Albany State University, are using the blockchain in partnership with IBM to create technology to help the visually impaired or for facial recognition tools. A group of Albany State students and faculty discussed their work at Tuesday’s Regents meeting.

Georgia State University announced Tuesday it’s offering four-day bootcamps next month.

 


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