Georgia DOE seeks public advice on state education blueprint.


In leaving No Child Left Behind and embracing the Every Student Succeeds Act last year, the federal government gave back more control of schools to states, some of which are trying to figure out how to use that new control to develop their own improvement plans and benchmarks.

ESSA puts a lot of faith in states to recognize problem schools and fix them. But states must submit their plans to the feds on how they are going to fix schools and evaluate teachers.

Georgia is in the midst of holding public hearings around the state on ESSA, and two University of Georgia education doctoral students urge people to get involved.

“While family and community feedback has previously been welcomed when enacting new education laws and policies, it is especially important now considering ESSA gives states more power over significant areas of education reform that can have a positive effect on Georgia’s students, families, and schools. Important topic areas addressed under the law include testing requirements, teacher development and evaluation, school accountability, and funding,” say Kimberly E. West and Christopher D. Holmes.

To read more, go to the AJC Get Schooled blog.


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