Five Fulton schools removed from state’s Focus list


The Georgia Department of Education removed five Fulton elementary schools from its list of low-performing schools Tuesday.

Focus Schools are the lowest-performing 10 percent of Title I schools (schools with a high percentage of students from low-income families). The department identifies these schools by tracking how well schools close the gap between their lowest-performing students and the state average over a three year period.

Asa G. Hilliard, C.H. Gullatt, High Point, Esther Jackson and Lake Forest elementary schools were removed from this list today because of improved student achievement.

“We are thrilled to see these five schools raise their student achievement and come off the list. It shows how intensive, hard work can pay off,” said Superintendent Jeff Rose. “I commend the students, staff and families at these schools for their efforts.”

Seven Fulton schools remained on the list: Bethune, Hamilton E. Holmes, Lee and Nolan elementary schools and Hapeville Charter, Sandtown and Woodland middle schools.

Three Fulton schools also remained on the Priority list, the lowest performing 5 percent of Title I schools: Banneker High School, Hapeville Charter Career Academy and Tri-Cities High School.

This is the last list of Focus and Priority schools the department will make. Moving forward, it will identify Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) and Targeted Support and Improvement schools. The criteria is still being developed and will be ready for the 2018-2019 school year.


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