Living Intown/Living Northside


The Westside’s Hathaway Gallery serves disruption with a smile

Story by Felicia Feaster. Photos by Jenni Girtman. With a skyline studded by cranes and new boutiques and restaurants popping up like mushrooms after a heavy rain, Atlanta is bursting at the seams. But the city’s art scene hasn’t always been part of that propulsive march forward. Galleries shutter, small independent spaces open and then close. Atlanta’s cumulative growth can often...


There’s something about Freddy

There’s something about Freddy

As much as Atlanta is heralded, the city gets a bum wrap when it comes to jazz artists. The truth is Atlanta is home to a number of musicians who play alongside acclaimed names in concerts around the world. There are even legendary musicians who have planted roots here, such as Freddy Cole, who recently performed at The Velvet Note in Alpharetta.
Swimming across America

Swimming across America

An inner calling emerged for Sydney Weissman in 2016 when her close friend Camille experienced a loss. Only weeks after the girls graduated from the Wesleyn School in Peachtree Corners, Camille’s mother, Karen High, passed away from colon cancer. Karen had survived the illness for five years.
New owners add fresh toppings to former “ranchburger” in Chastain Park

New owners add fresh toppings to former “ranchburger” in Chastain Park

Story by H.M. Cauley. Photos by Jenni Girtman. In the 1990s, real estate agents specialized in selling the low-slung brick bungalows of Chastain Park, and referred to the simple but functional 1950s plans as “ranchburgers.” That was in the days before gourmet burger stacks, McMansions, and the drive to bulldoze old houses to make way for more glamorous abodes.
Everything old is “Noog” again in Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain

Everything old is “Noog” again in Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain

Story by Curt and Lane Holman We recently visited Chattanooga to rediscover its distinct blend of big-city diversions and outdoor activities. But we also wanted to whet our curiosity about Chattanooga’s nickname. Do locals really call it “The Noog?” Or is it more of a civic branding thing? The answer seemed to be both, more or less.
Support groups assist with LGBTQ seniors’ challenges

Support groups assist with LGBTQ seniors’ challenges

Story by H.M. Cauley. Photos by Jenni Girtman. Richard Rhodes recently realized he was at an aging crossroads. A childless, single man whose parents have passed, the 80-year-old Brookhaven resident began thinking seriously about what would happen to his health, his condo and his cherished possessions as he got older.
Out & About: August calendar listings

Out & About: August calendar listings

AUGUST Theater: Essential elements Since its 1999 debut, Essential Theatre has staged an annual festival showcasing new work, including 26 Georgia writers. This year’s program include the magic realist tale “Built to Float” by Rachel Graf Evans and “Woke” by Georgia Playwriting Award Winner Avery Sharpe. The 2018 Essential Theatre Play Festival. Through Aug. 26.
Java Cats Cafe: Catnip for coffee lovers

Java Cats Cafe: Catnip for coffee lovers

Story by Haisten Willis. Photos by Jenni Girtman. Every so often, certain unexpected combinations work just right. French fries and a Frosty. Chicken and waffles. Whatever it is that goes into a Bloody Mary. Hadyn Hilton stumbled on one such pairing while working on a class project.
Sweet Auburn Market serves 100 years of curb appeal

Sweet Auburn Market serves 100 years of curb appeal

Story by H.M. Cauley One hundred years ago, what’s now known as the Sweet Auburn Curb Market at 209 Edgewood Ave. was more than an intown grocery. It started to resolve a problem created by a catastrophe. Flash back to downtown circa 1917. The Great Atlanta Fire swept across the district, consuming about 2,000 homes in a 200-acre swath.
Neighborhood cover bands rock out, get home at a decent hour

Neighborhood cover bands rock out, get home at a decent hour

Just after 8 p.m. on a Tuesday, it’s quiet on a darkened Decatur neighborhood. Yet listen closely, and you’ll hear the faint, rhythmic sound of a bass drum amid the upper-middle class calm. Follow the noise, and the muted melodies of an electric guitar emerge. Venture down one of the driveways, and the music grows louder. It may be a school night, but this ’hood rocks.
Todd Richards celebrates soul food with his autobiographical cookbook

Todd Richards celebrates soul food with his autobiographical cookbook

Chef Todd Richards had two goals for his first cookbook, a photo-filled, autobiographical, 150-recipe tome called “Soul.” The first was to share the culinary legacy of his own family. “People ask why I’m a chef,” he says, “and it’s really because of my family and how we ate together,” The second was a little more complicated.
More than masks: Atlanta puts African fine art increasingly on display

More than masks: Atlanta puts African fine art increasingly on display

Story by Anya Martin. Photos by Jenni Girtman. In 1985, while visiting an art school in Dakar, Senegal, Jean-Patrick Guichard was captivated by the work of young artist Cheikh Tidiane Kéïta. As a college student, Guichard could only afford $400 for a large acrylic painting textured with cardboard and tar depicting a faceless young man sitting on the ground.
Coco + Mischa supports sustainable fashion by hosting local makers

Coco + Mischa supports sustainable fashion by hosting local makers

When Melissa and Christy Gallagher were children growing up in Florida and later Georgia, their family nicknames were “Coco” and “Mischa.” Their close relationship is mirrored by their closeness in age, with Christy 14 months older. So when Melissa wanted to open a temporary pop-up shop in Decatur in December 2015, she enlisted Christy (now LeClair) as a business partner.
Found art trail in south Atlanta park turns trash into treasure

Found art trail in south Atlanta park turns trash into treasure

Story by Curt Holman “What we can’t make right, we can make better,” reads a hand-painted sign near the entrance of the paved trail at Constitution Lakes Park. It may seem like an all-purpose affirmation, but it’s one of the first hints of the park’s Doll’s Head Trail and aptly expresses its ethos.
Fulton Election Board: Top manager didn’t know he was consultant’s agent

Fulton Election Board: Top manager didn’t know he was consultant’s agent

Fulton County Election Board members expressed concerns on Thursday about “electioneering” having occurred inside the home of a high-ranking manager at the county’s election department and ordered the department’s staff to consider new policies to prevent similar situations.
Meet pair of architects tied to MA! (Modern Atlanta) Architecture Tour

Meet pair of architects tied to MA! (Modern Atlanta) Architecture Tour

Atlanta architects Cara Cummins and Jose Tavel live in a modern home they designed. The Atlanta husband-and-wife team also have a modern house they designed on the Atlanta Design Festival’s MA! (Modern Atlanta) Architecture Tour June 2-3. Cummins: I grew up on a horse farm in Virginia and received my architecture degree from Virginia Tech.
Georgia State freshman’s class has record grade-point average

Georgia State freshman’s class has record grade-point average

Georgia State University’s freshman class had the best high school grades of any incoming class since the university began tracking such data. This semester’s first-year students had a 3.5 grade-point average, officials said in its annual report released Wednesday of the freshman class. Average SAT scores for incoming students have increased by 20 points, to about 1100.
Bill Nordmark III made Atlanta friendlier city

Bill Nordmark III made Atlanta friendlier city

Bill Nordmark fought polio as a child and racism as an adult, all the while believing one person could make a difference. And he proved it in the way he lived his life of 69 years. The longtime Atlantan spent early childhood in an iron lung but went on to be a four-year letterman on Georgia State’s basketball team.
New DeKalb school starts kids learning younger

New DeKalb school starts kids learning younger

DeKalb County School District officials hope opening its doors to students as young as 3 will give them — and the district — a better chance to succeed later. Registration began recently for the district’s Early Learning Academy, which expects to receive some 200 3-year-old students when school begins in August.
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