Sukiyaki is a quick dinner amid hustle and bustle

Looking for a quick meal at this busy time of year? Try this Sukiyaki (Japanese Beef and Soy Sauce). In Japan, sukiyaki is a one-dish meal made right at the table. It’s a great dinner for when you’re in a hurry. The cooking can be done in 5 minutes.

Prepare all the ingredients in advance by boiling the noodles and cutting and arranging the remaining ingredients on a platter in order of use. Then bring the colorful plate to the table and cook. An electric frying pan or wok works well here. You can enjoy the aromas as the food cooks.

Or, if you prefer, simply prepare the dish in the kitchen and serve on individual plates. Remove from the pan and serve immediately for freshest taste.

Helpful hints:

  • A quick way to slice scallions is to snip them with a scissors.
  • Sake can be substituted for the dry sherry. Either one can be bought in small splits. Or add 2 more tablespoons soy sauce instead of the alcohol.


  • Place water for noodles on to boil.
  • Prepare ingredients.
  • Cook noodles.
  • Make sukiyaki.

Shopping list:

To buy: 1/2 pound sirloin, flank or skirt steak, 1 small package shitake mushrooms, 1 10-ounce bag washed, ready-to-eat spinach, 1 small bunch scallions, 1 small package Chinese noodles or angel hair pasta, 1 small bottle sesame oil, 1 small bottle low-sodium soy sauce and 1 small bottle dry sherry.

Staples: fat-free, low-salt chicken broth, sugar, onion and black peppercorns.

Sukiyaki (Japanese Beef and Soy Sauce)

Recipe by Linda Gassenheimer

3 ounces fat-free, no-salt-added chicken broth

2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce

2 tablespoons dry sherry

1/4 pound Chinese noodles or angel hair pasta

1/2 pound sirloin, flank or skirt steak

2 teaspoon sesame oil

1 tablespoon sugar

2 cups sliced onion

1 1/2 cups sliced shitake mushrooms

6 cups washed, ready-to-eat spinach

1 cup sliced scallions

Freshly ground black pepper

Place a large saucepan filled with water on to boil. Mix chicken broth, soy sauce and sherry together in a small bowl and set aside. Boil noodles 2 minutes or according to package instructions. Drain and divide between 2 dinner plates.

Remove visible fat from the steak and cut into thin strips, about 2 inches long and 1/4 to 1/2 inch wide. At the table, heat sesame oil in an electric wok or frying pan or over a portable burner. Add the sugar and stir to dissolve. Add the steak and toss in the pan about 30 seconds. Remove to a plate. Add the onion and cook 3 minutes. Add half of the chicken broth mixture and stir. Add mushrooms and cook 30 seconds. Add spinach, scallions and remaining sauce and cook 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Return steak to the skillet and toss with other ingredients. Season with pepper to taste. Remove from the pan and serve over noodles. Spoon all the sauce from the pan over the top.

Yield 2 servings.

Per serving: 672 calories (28 percent from fat), 21.1 g fat (6.4 g saturated, 8.6 g monounsaturated), 108 mg cholesterol, 51.4 g protein, 69.4 g carbohydrates, 7.3 g fiber, 733 mg sodium.

Reader Comments ...

Next Up in Food

First day of spring means free Rita’s Italian Ice all day on Tuesday
First day of spring means free Rita’s Italian Ice all day on Tuesday

The high on Tuesday in metro Atlanta is supposed to creep up to 65 degrees. While that’s not blistering hot, it is a bit warmer than it has been in recent weeks. It’s also the first day of spring, so maybe you’re just in a warmer mindset.  To celebrate, Rita’s Italian Ice is giving away free frozen treats on Tuesday...
Samosas at this Decatur grocery will take you to cloud nine
Samosas at this Decatur grocery will take you to cloud nine

The samosa pav from Cherians International Groceries. CONTRIBUTED BY HENRI HOLLIS Dish of the Week: Samosas at Cherians International Groceries I had my first-ever samosa at Your DeKalb Farmers Market when I was a kid, grocery shopping with my mom. It was one of those seminal food moments that I still remember — a real awakening,...
Unlock the sweet side of cabbage without opening any windows
Unlock the sweet side of cabbage without opening any windows

I have unfortunate childhood memories of cabbage and cabbage soup. When I was a kid, my mother's boiled cabbage would send me running from the house - from the smell. Later, she and at least one of my older sisters spent many unhappy months on the then-trendy cabbage soup diet, complaining with every bite. I've come to love the vegetable in adulthood...
Postcard from Paris: Chez Papa

Stopping in Paris for a few days on my way to the wine regions of France has become a ritual. There's usually a trip to Willi's Wine Bar on the Right Bank. Willi's has always served exceptional wine, but the cuisine was somewhat rustic. It has recently upped its game in the kitchen, for which I am grateful.  Joel Robuchon's l'Atelier, on the Left...
What. Just. Happened?! NCAAs amp up the March Madness
What. Just. Happened?! NCAAs amp up the March Madness

One word succinctly describes what's transpired so far in the NCAA Tournament:  Madness.  But even that's probably underselling it.  A comeback for the ages by Nevada. An entire region left without a Top 4 seed in the Sweet 16 for the first time in tourney history. The 16-seed winner UMBC, falling short in its attempt to extend its historic...
More Stories