Carrabba’s classic Chicken Marsala is family favorite


A: My parents and I have been going to Carrabba’s Italian Grill for 18 years. [It’s] our favorite Italian restaurant. Even when I was little and got the pizza, I always ate off my mother’s plate of Chicken Marsala. It is that GOOD. I was hoping you could get that recipe for me so I could give it to my mother as a part of a present for Christmas. Thank you. — Janelle Ruff, Kennesaw

A. Not in time for Christmas, but perhaps as an early Mother’s Day gift, we have the recipe for Carrabba’s Chicken Marsala. It’s a classic Italian dish that goes together quickly.

Carrabba’s Chicken Marsala

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

All-purpose flour for coating chicken breast

1 (8-ounce) chicken breast, pounded thin

Salt and pepper

1/4 cup sliced button mushrooms

1/2 cup dry Marsala

1 slice prosciutto, cut into 1/4-inch strips

2 teaspoons finely chopped yellow onion

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small cubes

1 tablespoon finely chopped Italian parsley

In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. While oil is heating, put a small amount of flour on a dinner plate. Lightly season both sides of chicken breast with salt and pepper. When oil is hot, place chicken breast in flour to lightly coat both sides and add to the hot oil. Cook 2 to 3 minutes until brown on one side. Turn chicken and cook 1 minute more. Add mushrooms to skillet and cook 1 minute. Add Marsala, prosciutto and onion. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper. Heat until Marsala is almost completely reduced. Remove from heat and toss chicken and mushrooms well. The wine should have evaporated to a thick syrup. Allow the skillet to cool 1 minute, then add butter and put skillet over low heat. Use a whisk to mix the butter into the reduced wine. Do not allow the sauce to get too hot or it will separate. Once all the butter has been whisked in, add parsley and toss. Arrange chicken and mushrooms on serving plate and spoon sauce over chicken. Serves: 1

Per serving: 774 calories (percent of calories from fat, 55), 63 grams protein, 15 grams carbohydrates, 1 gram fiber, 42 grams fat (17 grams saturated), 213 milligrams cholesterol, 924 milligrams sodium.



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