Eliza Dushku says she was molested by 'True Lies' stunt coordinator at age 12


Actress Eliza Dushku took to Facebook on Saturday to allege that she was molested as a child by a "True Lies" stunt coordinator.

"When I was 12 years old, while filming 'True Lies,' I was sexually molested by Joel Kramer, one of Hollywood's leading stunt coordinators," wrote Dushku, now 37. 

"Ever since, I have struggled with how and when to disclose this, if ever. At the time, I shared what happened to me with my parents, two adult friends and one of my older brothers. No one seemed ready to confront this taboo subject then, nor was I."

>> Read the full post here (WARNING: Discretion advised.)

She alleged that Kramer, who was 36 at the time, lured her to his hotel room, put her on the bed, then "disappeared in the bathroom and emerged, naked, bearing nothing but a small hand towel held flimsy at his mid-section" before wrapping his body around her and sexually assaulting her.

Dushku also said she was, "by no small coincidence," hurt in a "stunt-gone-wrong on the Harrier jet" the same day a friend she had confided in confronted Kramer about the incident.

"With broken ribs, I spent the evening in the hospital," Dushku wrote. "To be clear, over the course of those months rehearsing and filming True Lies, it was Joel Kramer who was responsible for my safety on a film that at the time broke new ground for action films. On a daily basis he rigged wires and harnesses on my 12 year old body. My life was literally in his hands: he hung me in the open air, from a tower crane, atop an office tower, 25+ stories high. Whereas he was supposed to be my protector, he was my abuser."

Kramer has denied the allegations, Variety reported.

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According to the Los Angeles Times, "True Lies" writer and director James Cameron said Dushku "is very brave for speaking up, and I think all the women are that are speaking out and calling for a reckoning now."

“I know the other party – not well. He hasn't worked for me since then," Cameron said, according to the Times report. "The fact that this was happening under our noses and we didn’t know about it, I think going forward it’s important for all industries – certainly Hollywood – to create a safe avenue for people to speak up."

Read more here.


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