Power still out in Puerto Rico; Southern Company sends more crews


Southern Company has deployed line workers and support staff to Puerto Rico to help restore power to the area ravaged by Hurricane Maria.

Drawn from Alabama Power, Georgia Power, Gulf Power and Mississippi Power companites, the crews are part of an industry effort comprising 1,500 workers, said the company in a written statement. Those workers will join another 4,000 to restore the island’s power grid.

Southern Company CEO Thomas Fanning said his company is proud to be part of the operation which has sent 5,500 workers to help with restoration efforts in Puerto Rico.

“Our employees are dedicated to the effort and determined to restore and repair Puerto Rico’s energy grid,” said Fanning.

The effort is being coordinated by the Edison Electric Institute, an association that represents all investor-owned electric companies in the U.S.

The new crew will join Southern Power’s Incident Management Team deployed to Puerto Rico in December.

Hundreds of trucks with tools and equipment shipped to Puerto Rico will provide materials, equipment, and resources to the island.

Four months ago, Hurricane Maria - a Category 5 storm- swept across the nation, destroying the island’s 2,400 miles of transmission lines, 30,000 miles of distribution lines, and 342 substations.

Vast parts of the island are still without power.



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