Tight race forces runoff in one Georgia PSC contest


One of the two Public Service Commission races may be headed for a runoff.

Unofficial results from the Georgia Secretary of State’s office show that none of the candidates - Republican Chuck Eaton, Democrat Lindy Miller or Libertarian Ryan Graham - garnered enough votes for a clear win on Tuesday.

Eaton and Miller, the two top vote-getters, will face off again Dec. 4.

Georgia law requires a candidate to receive 50 percent of the votes plus one to win a race.

“I knew there was a possibility of a runoff going back to when I qualified to run,” said Eaton, who won a runoff in his first bid for the PSC in 2006.

“It’s just another 30 days of campaigning,” he said, adding that he would stick to the same message of finishing the expansion of the Vogtle nuclear plant, keeping rates low. and encouraging job growth in the state.

Both Miller’s and Eaton’s campaigns say they are now preparing for the runoff for the seat which covers four counties in the state - Fulton, DeKalb, Clayton and Rockdale. Miller, a businesswoman and first-time political candidate, said she would continue with her grassroots strategy and encourage supporters to vote early.

“Our campaign is fired up. We’re going to carry our momentum forward, win this race for the people of Georgia,” she said in a statement.

In the District 5 race, unofficial results show incumbent Republican Tricia Pridemore with more than 50 percent of the vote followed by her closest challenger, Dawn Randolph, a Democrat.

The Public Service Commission, a state body comprising of five elected officials who serve staggered six-year terms, determines the state’s energy plans and the state’s electric, natural gas and landline rates. They are also tasked with ensuring the safety of the state’s pipeline.



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