Atlanta Restaurant Scene

In Memoriam 2017: 7 people the Atlanta restaurant world lost this year


 

Angus Brown

The 8Arm and Octopus Bar co-owner and chef died suddenly in January at age 35. Brown's business partner Nhan Le said, "Angus will forever be remembered for his generosity of spirit, enthusiasm, and extraordinary talent. His favorite place was in the kitchen, and he was someone that everyone wanted to be around. We’ll miss him every day."

 

 

Richard Thomas

The owner of longtime Buckhead health food eatery R. Thomas died in January after a long career which included a stint in the health food industry. "Richard was an incredible man who was a genius at promoting health and wellness to the Atlanta community," one friend shared on Facebook.

 

Cynthia Montoya

The Fox. Bros. BBQ general manager died in March after a two-year battle with pancreatic cancer. “Cynthia Montoya was a great employee, and more importantly, a great friend,” co-owner Justin Fox said in a statement. “She was the heart and soul of Fox Bros Bar-B-Que, always quick with a bad joke to make you smile when you needed it most."

 

Ellyn Webb

Ellyn Webb, longtime owner of Northside Tavern and a woman known in the Atlanta blues scene as a matriarch, died in May at 63 after a yearlong battle with cancer. “She was instrumental in implementing live entertainment, which is the evolution of it becoming the renowned blues club that it is today,” said her brother and business partner Tommy Webb.

 

Patrick Kuhen

The head bartender at Bon Ton was killed in August after being hit by a car while on his motorcycle. He was 31 years old. "Easily one of the best bartenders I have known, and an even better human being and friend. One of our lighthouses really," said Bon Ton partner Eric Simpkins.

 

Chelsea Beller

The 29-year-old died in November after being shot and killed during a robbery at Barcelona Wine Bar, where she worked as a manager. “She lived by her heart, and loved everyone whole-heartedly,” friend Lauda Rodriguez Lacayo said. “To live out loud is something a lot of people are afraid of, and she was not.”

 

Windsor Jordan

The owner of Mary B. Jordan Catering Service (and the brother of civil rights leader Vernon Jordan) operated the business started by his mother until his retirement. He died in December at 80. “We celebrated life, and I celebrated it with him,” friend James Ellis said.

 


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