You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myAJC.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myAJC.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myAJC.com.

Potential laptop ban on Europe flights could cause hassles for travelers


As U.S. and E.U. officials meet to discuss expanding a ban on laptops, tablets and other large electronic devices in carry-on bags to flights from Europe to the United States, airline industry observers have raised concerns. 

Some worry an expansion of the ban could lead to a reduction in travel to the United States from Europe and cause frustrations for travelers.  

"Such an announcement would clearly negatively impact point of sale Europe to the US, as the US could become a less desirable place to travel," wrote Cowen airline analyst Helane Becker in a note to investors.

Pace University management professor Andrew Coggins Jr. pointed out that putting laptops in checked bags "exposes them to theft and damage," and inconveniences business travelers who may also use their laptops during long international flights.

International Air Transport Association CEO Alexandre de Juniac wrote a letter to U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly and European Commission Transport Commissioner Violeta Bulc on Tuesday expressing “serious concern regarding the negative impact” an expansion of the ban would have on passengers, airlines and the global economy.

IATA said businesses will cancel trips “rather than risk having laptops checked due to risk to confidential information.”

Airlines will also incur additional costs due to extra baggage handling, delays due to increased baggage screening, liability due to theft/damage and potential reduced flights, according to IATA.

The group estimated a $1.1 billion impact on passengers per year due to lost productive time, longer travel time and harm to “passenger well being.” It also said increasing the number of lithium battery-powered devices in the cargo hold could affect safety.

An extension of the ban to Europe would affect 390 flights per day. according to IATA. Last year, 31 million passengers flew from Europe to the United States.

In his letter, de Juniac urged short-term measures including additional screening at checkpoints to inspect devices.

An expansion of the restriction would increase the number of passengers affected by a ban announced earlier this year.

In March, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced a ban on large electronics for passengers on flights to the United States from airports in Jordan, Egypt, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. The policy means that no laptops, tablets, e-readers, cameras, portable DVD players or other personal electronic devices larger than a cell phone or smart phone are allowed in carry-on baggage for passengers on those flights. 

The policy was due to intelligence indicating that terrorist groups are "pursuing innovating methods to undertake their attacks, to include smuggling explosive devices in various consumer items." 

The Airline Passenger Experience Association said if the ban is expanded, affected travelers should use cloud services to access documents and files from their phones on flights with wi-fi access, and can buy a small folding Bluetooth keyboard for their phone, or carry files on a USB drive. 

The association says travelers should also consider buying supplemental insurance for their electronic devices, since some plans exclude personal electronics in checked baggage from coverage.

MYAJC.COM: REAL JOURNALISM. REAL LOCAL IMPACT.

AJC Business reporter Kelly Yamanouchi keeps you updated on the latest news about Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Delta Air Lines and the airline industry in metro Atlanta and beyond. You'll find more on myAJC.com, including these stories:

Never miss a minute of what's happening in local business news. Subscribe to myAJC.com.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Travel

How to earn travel rewards without a credit card

Credit card averse? You’re not alone. According to a recent study from Bankrate, 35 percent of adults ages 30 and over don’t have a credit card.  The bad news is, not having a travel credit card does make it more difficult to earn travel rewards — that is, unless you travel often enough to rack up loyalty points by the thousands...
Cool cruises around Iceland
Cool cruises around Iceland

A summer cruise around Iceland is an ideal way to appreciate the country’s landscape, which includes geysers, waterfalls and glaciers. Diane Eide, an Iceland specialist at Travel Experts, said such a trip was “a convenient way to see much of the country because driving from place to place takes a lot of time.” An Iceland cruise is...
Can this contraption really help you sleep on a plane?
Can this contraption really help you sleep on a plane?

Ephi Zlotnitsky landed in Washington as a 22-year-old immigrant from Israel on a July Saturday in 1989.  The next day, the former Israel paratrooper, who barely spoke English, walked into a local kosher deli and got a job. As he recalls it: "The owner said, 'I don't have a job for you.' I said, 'I'm not leaving.' He asked me, what can I do?"...
Save $1,000 on a Cuba cruise and other travel deals

This week's best travel bargains around the globe.  Land   Book a vacation at one of four Four Seasons Tropical Resorts and receive a free future stay. With the Book Once, Stay Twice deal, make a reservation at the Four Seasons Resort and Residences Anguilla, Four Seasons Resort Costa Rica at Peninsula Papagayo, Four Seasons Resort Nevis...
More air travelers are expected to fly this summer despite airline incidents

A record 234.1 million passengers are expected to fly on U.S.-based carriers this summer, apparently not dissuaded by a series of customer-relations blowups in recent weeks.  Airlines for America, which represents the airline industry, attributes the projected 4 percent increase in summer travel to improving economic conditions, higher household...
More Stories