Georgia: Jekyll Island, Dahlonega, state parks will entertain families


Jekyll Island

Jekyll Island was once the domain of the privileged elite. Now, it’s an affordable vacation retreat for everyone. You can get a feel for what the old days were like in the historic district on the river side of the island. The moneyed class of the Gilded Age must not have liked staying directly on the beach, but these days, that’s where you want to be at places like the centrally located Holiday Inn Resort (rates start at $139; 701 Beachview Drive N., Jekyll Island. 912-635-2211, www.ihg.com). The ocean-view rooms open up to a grassy dune area where you can watch the slow pace of Jekyll unfold from your patio or balcony, then take a few steps to become a part of the action. Bike trails connect the resort to the rest of Jekyll (don’t miss surreal Driftwood Beach or the enchanting Georgia Sea Turtle Center). The best place to eat seafood on the island — the Beach House — is on site. The resort is pet-friendly.

Dahlonega

Dahlonega is a something-for-everyone mountain town, ideal for a family getaway close to Atlanta. Kids will love learning how to pan for gold, tubing down the Chestatee River, the underground tour of the Consolidated Gold Mine, and all the treats awaiting them at the Fudge Factory, the Dahlonega General Store and many other shops on the historic town square. Stay and eat at the Smith House (rates start at $99; 84 S. Chestatee St., Dahlonega. 706-867-7000, www.smithhouse.com). It’s only a block from the square and features one of the best family-style dining rooms in the state.

State parks with lodges

Five Georgia State Parks have lodges appealing to families who don’t camp. Head for the mountains at Unicoi Lodge close to Helen or Amicalola Falls Lodge perched above the highest cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi. In central and southwest Georgia, Little Ocmulgee Lodge and George T. Bagby Lodge beckon golfers to their championship courses, have plentiful outdoor activities and offer traditional Southern dining. Lake Blackshear Resort has the added bonus of being situated on 8,700-acre Lake Blackshear with its boating and other water sports options. Rates start at $119; 1-800-864-7275, gastateparks.org/lodges.




Next Up in Travel

How to save yourself a (snow)pile of cash

With a whiff of winter in the air, skiers' thoughts naturally drift to snowy mountains, fireside après-ski drinks and the macroeconomic concept of inelastic demand - used to describe products for which price can increase astonishingly, regardless of supply, without hurting demand. This is especially true of daydreamers who want to take their...
Special effects are added to Queen Mary’s ghost tour
Special effects are added to Queen Mary’s ghost tour

LOS ANGELES — The Queen Mary, a retired ocean liner that has become a floating hotel in the Long Beach harbor, has turned to the type of special effects made famous in Hollywood to try to boost visitor numbers. For more than 15 years, the ship has offered a ghost tour — dubbed the Ghosts and Legends Tour — to draw and scare fans who...
How to pack the perfect traveling art studio
How to pack the perfect traveling art studio

Finding the time to create meaningful art on the road can be a challenge all by itself. Making room for all of your favorite supplies is another hurdle altogether. This fact was driven home to me quite clearly during a fairly intense creative awakening over the past year. As someone who enjoys creating with a variety of materials per piece, I look...
A complicated race to the best cruise Wi-Fi
A complicated race to the best cruise Wi-Fi

Seemingly every cruise line now wants to offer its guests the fastest Wi-Fi internet connection at sea, but the reality of doing so is not so cut and dried.  The reason why is not dissimilar to the struggle to find bars on our cellphones: Wired is still more reliable than wireless. When on land, even Wi-Fi connections are primarily terrestrial...
What you need to know about the new ID law and travel

In the past several months, there has been plenty of conversation about the Real ID Act and how it will affect air travelers. Passed by Congress in 2005, the act is intended to prevent identity fraud, and starting on Jan. 22, 2018, flyers who reside in some states, even if they’re flying domestically, will need identification other than a driver&rsquo...
More Stories