FDR’s Little White House and 13 other sites free one day in February 


The State Parks and Historic Sites Division of the Department of Natural Resources is offering free admission at several locations on Sunday, Feb. 5. The event is part of Georgia History Festival’s statewide celebration of “Super Museum Sunday.” Visitors can walk in the footsteps of Civil War and Revolutionary War soldiers, tour FDR’s modest cottage, explore plantations, climb to the top of an Indian mound and experience more during this annual event.  Admission costs typically range from $2-$12, and a few of these historic sites are typically closed.

But on Sunday, Feb. 5, the following will be open and free:


Participating Sites include: 

 

Chief Vann House Historic Site (Chatsworth) – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

 

Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site (Dahlonega) – 10 a.m. - 4:45 p.m. 

 

Fort King George Historic Site (Darien) – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

 

Fort McAllister State Park (Richmond Hill) – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

 

Fort Morris Historic Site (Midway) – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

 

Hofwyl-Broadfield Plantation Historic Site (Brunswick) — 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

 

Jarrell Plantation Historic Site (Juliette) – Noon – 4 p.m. 

 

Kolomoki Mounds State Park (Blakely) -- 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

 

Lawton Museum at Magnolia Springs State Park (Millen) – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

 

Liberty Hall at A.H. Stephens State Park (Crawfordville) -- 9 – 5 p.m. 

 

New Echota Historic Site (Calhoun) – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

 

Roosevelt’s Little White House Historic Site (Warm Springs) – 9 a.m. - 4:45 p.m. 

 

Travelers Rest Historic Site (Toccoa) -- 9 – 5 p.m. 

 

Wormsloe Historic Site (Savannah) – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. 

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources operates more than 60 state parks and historic sites, providing a wide range of outdoor recreation and historic education. Visitors can enjoy trails, fishing, boating, bike rental, paddling, guided tours, geocaching, golf and much more. 

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