It’s official: Former Bulldog Jacob Eason will play at Washington


ATHENS — It’s official: Jacob Eason is transferring from Georgia to Washington. 

Washington announced the news through its social media accounts on Tuesday afternoon, on the eve of national signing day. 

“Welcome home,” said the message, which Eason retweeted, and included a 1 minute, 14 second video.

Eason will have to sit out the 2018 season, per NCAA transfer rules, then will have two years of eligibility. 

A five-star prospect in the 2016 class, Eason came to Georgia from Lake Stevens, Wash., and was considered the future of a Bulldogs offense that needed a lift. He leaves after the offense did get going and nearly won an SEC championship – but with someone else as the quarterback. 

Eason was Georgia’s starting quarterback at the beginning of the 2017 season, after starting the Bulldogs’ final 12 games of the 2016 season. But then Eason was hurt in the first quarter of the season opener, and never got his starting job back. 

Jake Fromm led the team so well while Eason worked his way back from a sprained knee that when Eason was cleared to return there was no question Fromm would hold onto the start. Fromm would lead the team to an SEC championship, a Rose Bowl victory and within a play of a national championship. 

Eason, watching from the sideline, handled the situation well, by all accounts, with head coach Kirby Smart reserving praise on Eason for his patience and teamwork. Eason announced shortly after the season ended that he would transfer. 

The Seattle Times, citing sources, reported after the national championship that Eason was likely to transfer to Washington. 

Georgia signed Justin Fields, another five-star prospect, who has enrolled early and will be one of two scholarship quarterbacks on the roster this season, barring a late addition.


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