High school girls basketball player of the year


Girls Basketball Player of the Year

Mikayla Coombs, Wesleyan

Achievements: Coombs averaged 16.9 points, 7.0 rebounds, 4.5 assists and 4.0 steals for a Wesleyan team that finished 28-4 and won the Class A private-school championship. It was the Wolves’ second state title during her career and their 12th in the past 17 seasons. She scored a game-high 17 points and added nine rebounds in a 51-48 victory against Holy Innocents’ in the state final, and her 10 points in the last 4:11 of the second quarter helped Wesleyan rally from a 32-15 deficit. Coombs was selected to play in the McDonald’s All-American and Jordan Brand Classic games, was the Gatorade state player of the year and was named Miss Georgia Basketball by the Atlanta Tipoff Club.

Position: Shooting guard

Height/Weight: 5-foot-10, 140 pounds

Class: Senior

College choice: Signed with Connecticut

Why Connecticut: I felt that it was the best place for me. I know that I’m going to be asked to be my very best every day, and that’s important to me. I also have a very good relationship with the coaching staff as well as the players.

Best high school moment: My best high school moment is winning state this year. It was amazing for me to be able to finish out my high school career with my senior classmates, coaches and other teammates with a win in our final game.

Why basketball: I have always had a passion for basketball. I’ve played a lot of sports in my life, but I’ve never had a true passion and drive for other sports like I do with basketball.

What you’d like to be doing in 10 years: I would love to be working as a sports broadcaster or playing professionally, and helping coach a local youth basketball team or basketball organization.

Favorite high school course/why: My favorite high school course is history. I like history because it tells you how and why certain things happened in the world.

People who helped along the way: First and foremost, my family. Secondly, I’ve had countless coaches and teachers shape me into the person I am today, but the two that stand out the most are Jan Azar and Alfred Motton, my high school and AAU coaches.

Toughest high school opponent: I would say our toughest high school opponent would be Holy Innocents’. They’re our rival, and they’re a team full of really talented players. You always know you’re going to get a good game out of them. (Wesleyan and Holy Innocents’ played each other 12 times in the past three seasons, including three consecutive meetings in the championship game. Holy Innocents’ held an 8-4 advantage in those matchups, but Wesleyan won two of the three state titles.)

Favorite movie: My favorite movie would be “Like Mike” or any of the “Fast and Furious” series.

Favorite song: My favorite song is “That’s What I Like” by Bruno Mars.

Worst high school moment: My worst high school moment was tearing my ACL in the first game of my sophomore basketball season.

If you could be any other athlete on earth: I would be LeBron James, because he is a model athlete. He is extremely successful, and he has found a way to keep himself out of the media with any scandals.

Money or happiness: I would rather have happiness. There are countless rich people in the world today who seem miserable because people are constantly asking them for money or they spend all their money and are left bankrupt. I think having too much money can lead to unnecessary problems, but you can never have too much happiness.

Best word to describe yourself: Caring.

View of the world at this moment: My view of the world at this moment is skeptical. I feel like day-by-day the world is growing, but with the growth comes countless problems we still have to deal with.

What you would put in a time capsule: I would put a video of myself right now talking about what I want to have in the future, such as my family life, my career and where I would like to be in life. I think it would be cool to listen to this video in the future and see if I followed my dreams or not.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Sports

LEADOFF: Remember Atlanta’s 2013 Final Four? There’s little left standing.
LEADOFF: Remember Atlanta’s 2013 Final Four? There’s little left standing.

There’s little left standing from Atlanta’s 2013 Final Four. The building that hosted it is gone, and so is the championship that was won there that spring.  The NCAA Infractions Committee on Tuesday denied Louisville’s appeal of an earlier ruling stripping the Cardinals of the men’s basketball championship they won...
How did 'average' skier Elizabeth Swaney make it to the 2018 Winter Olympics?
How did 'average' skier Elizabeth Swaney make it to the 2018 Winter Olympics?

One skier who competed in the women's halfpipe at the 2018 Winter Olympics really stood out – but not for her skills. American Elizabeth Swaney, a member of Hungary's team who finished in last place Monday after a qualifying run that Deadspin described as "thoroughly average," apparently was able to game the Olympics' quota system...
For snowboarders, the music matters as much as the gear
For snowboarders, the music matters as much as the gear

At the Olympic snowboard events, the party-like atmosphere includes dance music booming in the background and loud gasps of “ooooh” and “ahhhh” from the lively crowds responding to every high-flying trick. But when American Arielle Gold dropped into the halfpipe for her bronze medal-winning run, she didn’t hear any of...
German Olympians drink a lot of beer, and win a lot of gold medals
German Olympians drink a lot of beer, and win a lot of gold medals

When Simon Schempp, a biathlete on the German Olympic team, was training for the Pyeongchang Games, he often capped a hard day on the trail with a bottle of nonalcoholic beer. He enjoys the taste of beer like most Germans, who drink more of it per capita than the people of almost any other nation. But he drank the nonalcoholic variety for more than...
I didn't understand that Olympians were so small - and so vulnerable
I didn't understand that Olympians were so small - and so vulnerable

The first thing I noticed about ice dancer Madison Chock was that she was so much smaller in person. Most on-ice athletes are. The skates normally provide a boost. But standing next to a railing that separated her from a horde of reporters, she looked downright tiny. Most of the Olympians are smaller than you think. Absent the gear and the distance...
More Stories