What coach Chris Petersen said after Washington’s loss at Stanford


Well, that just happened.

Washington lost 30-22 at Stanford on Friday night, a game that knocked the Huskies out of the playoff race and made the chances of getting back to the Pac-12 title game really tough.

Washington coach Chris Petersen was understandably upset after watching his team put up its worst defensive performance of the season and do almost nothing on offense after the first few drives.

Chris Petersen: "They just played their game better than we played our game. They hold the ball, grind up time, try to limit your possessions, and they did exactly that." https://t.co/HooRtDnHAj

— Adam Jude (@A_Jude) November 11, 2017

Stanford’s Bryce Love ran for 166 yards and three touchdowns, and on many occasions Washington players had him in their grasp but couldn’t bring him down.

“If you don’t tackle well, then that’s a recipe for disaster,” Petersen said, per Adam Jude of the Seattle Times. “We didn’t tackle well enough and our coverage wasn’t like it normally is.”

Quarterback Jake Browning, who was 17-of-23 for 190 yards, said the focus now is on finishing out the season strong and making the most of the remaining games.

“We’re going to find out who can rally and who’s going to turn over and die and who’s going to come back fighting harder,” Browning said, per Jude. “We like to say we’re a team that bounces back harder, but we’ll see.”

The post What coach Chris Petersen said after Washington’s loss at Stanford appeared first on Diehards.


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