Georgia Tech to receive official visit from elite prospect


Wheeler High small forward Jordan Tucker, a prospect at the top of Georgia Tech’s wish list for the 2017 signing class, will make an official visit to the school April 28. On Thursday, Tucker’s father confirmed earlier reports of the plans to visit Syracuse this weekend, Oregon on April 21 and Tech.

“That’ll be it for right now,” Lou Tucker said.

Tucker would be a major addition to coach Josh Pastner’s first signing class. He is rated the No. 40 prospect nationally by ESPN and the No. 5 senior in the state. Tech has received a letter of intent from New York point guard Jose Alvarado and a commitment from Oklahoma shooting guard Curtis Haywood.

With only six players returning after forward Christian Matthews’ decision to transfer , Pastner is in dire need of players who can play immediately. Tucker, 6-foot-7 and 200 pounds, would seem capable of stepping in immediately to give the Jackets a lift on the perimeter, where there isn’t a viable option at small forward.

Tucker attended multiple games at McCamish Pavilion this season, including the upset of Florida State on Jan. 25.

“I think he’s a good coach,” Lou Tucker said of Pastner. “He’s gotten a lot out of his players, helped them reach their full potential.”

Tucker’s father said that a decision would be made in late April or early May.

Tech also continues to recruit the state’s other high-profile prospect who has yet to sign, Jonesboro High guard M.J. Walker, rated the No. 3 player nationally by ESPN.



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