advertisement

Special weekly section: Food Extra

4 cool coleslaws that don’t use cabbage
Michael Tercha

4 cool coleslaws that don’t use cabbage

Bored with the usual slaws? The mayo-doused number at the deli or your aunt’s vinegared version?

Don’t fret. We’ve dug up recipes that get to the root of your problem — which is that cabbage is so 245 years ago. The koolsla recipes the Dutch brought to this country circa 1770 used cabbage. And that’s been pretty much the base for coleslaws ever since.

But chefs and culinary pros like to tinker with classic recipes, so they’re using beets, kohlrabi, carrots, fennel, celery root. All are sturdy, colorful, flavorful. All have slaw potential.

The fennel slaw served with a roasted fish sandwich at Found Kitchen and Social House in Evanston, Ill.

How locavores will destroy the world

In the last 20 years, the amount of local foods consumed in the American diet has tripled, according to the USDA, and now comprises 2 percent of food consumed in the U.S. As with anything that’s popular, some have seen fit to tear it down. Why do they do this? Do they find the locavores to be annoying, or do they seriously believe, as many argue, that local food enthusiasts pose a threat to the planet?

advertisement


Book teaches the home chef how to forage
Timber Press

Book teaches the home chef how to forage

How far will forager Lisa Rose go to get a fresh salad?

She tells the story of a cross-country drive with her two kids several years back, a trip that included too many stops at chain restaurants.

Coming out of one such establishment — “It might have been in Wyoming” — after yet another unsatisfying meal, she spotted a wild chicory plant growing in a hedgerow along the parking lot.

Recipe of the Week: Make-Your-Own Macaroni and Cheese Mix
Eva Kolenko

Recipe of the Week: Make-Your-Own Macaroni and Cheese Mix

Macaroni and cheese from a blue box conjures a certain kind of American nostalgia that many of us still harbor — even those of us who might use the word “foodie” and can make homemade mac from scratch.

Miyoko Schinner, author of “The Homemade Vegan Pantry: The Art of Making Your Own Staples” ($22.99, Ten Speed Press), admits a soft spot for that bright orange cheese sauce, but she also wanted a DIY vegan alternative that would be just as easy to mix with water or a dairy substitute on a busy school night (it would also be tasty made with milk if you’re not vegan).

advertisement


Eggplant, broiled or fried (but especially fried)
ANDREW SCRIVANI

Eggplant, broiled or fried (but especially fried)

To fry or not to fry?

That is the question I face every eggplant season.

Whether ‘tis nobler to suffer the oil-slicked mire that gets tracked all over the kitchen, or to take arms against the sea of grease, keeping the splatter to areas dark and unseen in the depths of the broiler.

Broiling is easier, less messy and more hands-off, leaving you free to toss the salad while your eggplant softens and chars.

Olive bar is a fast stop for dinner
Kathleen Purvis

Olive bar is a fast stop for dinner

Olive, I love an olive bar. Of all the innovations in supermarket food bars, the olive bar is the one I can’t resist.

Remember when the best olives you could find in a supermarket were all stuffed with pimentos and packed in jars? If you wanted good olives — meaty, tasty, mouth-filling olives — you had to find a Middle Eastern market or pay up at a gourmet store.

Test Kitchen: This weekend, try easy, crowd-pleasing barbecued shrimp
MARY SCHROEDER

Test Kitchen: This weekend, try easy, crowd-pleasing barbecued shrimp

Shrimp is terrific grilled as a main dish or an appetizer. The challenge with shrimp on the grill is it’s fragile and cooks quickly. If you overcook shrimp, it becomes tough and chewy. The key is marinating or brining the shrimp and using no more than a medium heat. You can also brush the shrimp with a sauce while they are on the grill to keep them from drying out.


advertisement



Living Intown Magazine – a product of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Gain an insider’s perspective into the unique neighborhoods of in town Atlanta. Our lifestyle magazine explores all the things that make in-town living so appealing – from restaurants and attractions to the neighborhoods and their distinct personalities. Available on your desktop, tablet and smartphone and at select outlets around town.

Learn More

AJC launches Breakdown, a new podcast series

AJC launches Breakdown, a new podcast series

Follow the twists and turns of a case that some say landed an innocent man in prison. Subscribers get exclusive access to new episodes each Sunday - plus digital extras including character backgrounds, video interviews, photo galleries, court documents and timelines.

Learn more