Voids discovered in Great Pyramid; scientists now try to figure out what they are


The Great Pyramid has been a puzzle for scientists for centuries, but new discoveries are leading to new questions about one of the wonders of the classical world.

Scientists, using state-of-the-art technology, have found voids in the massive structure, which was built in 2560 BC, The Telegraph reported.

A group of experts from universities, companies and institutes worldwide comprise "Scan Pyramids" and are using muography, thermography and 3-D simulation to map the pyramid.

Muons are able to penetrate thick rocks like X-rays penetrate the body, Discovery's Seeker website reported earlier this year.

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The group also scanned the Bent Pyramid, named for the slope of the upper section of the structure, as the first in its year-long project.

Thermography uses infrared to map structures. The different techniques are then combined to render a 3-D reconstruction to study the ancient buildings.

The team has found chevron patterns made of stone that it said were not used as decoration, but possibly to seal voids in structure.

Chevrons were used to cover the king and queen chambers, to either protect a room or keep a roof from collapsing, Scan Pyramid reported

Now researchers are trying to determine why so many chevrons were put in to protect a small area on a descending corridor

Scientists said they performed multiple tests to make sure it was not noise or "statistical fluctuation" and the results suggest that there is a void, or voids, behind the stonework.

The teams confirmed the void on the north face of the pyramid. Now they are trying to find the precise size and shape. 

They are also examining the queen's Cchamber. The results are expected to be released early 2017, The Telegraph reported.

To read more on the discovery and the technology used, click here.


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