Trump rips ‘Fire and Fury,’ calls it 'full of lies' in angry tweet


President Donald Trump lashed out against the author of a new book about his 2016 campaign and the first months of his administration, tweeting that it was “full of lies,” CNN reported Friday.

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Michael Wolff’s book, “Fire and Fury,” was released Friday morning and already was listed as a No. 1 best seller on the Amazon website. Wolff wrote about Trump’s campaign and the early days of his presidency, and the president took to Twitter late Thursday to denounce it. 

“I authorized Zero access to White House (actually turned him down many times) for author of phony book! I never spoke to him for book. Full of lies, misrepresentations and sources that don't exist,” Trump tweeted, also referring to his former adviser, Steve Bannon, as “Sloppy Steve.”

Some of the claims in Wolff’s book include Trump’s belief that he was not going to defeat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, and that his wife, Melania Trump, was upset when did win. Other excerpts depicted Trump being angry over celebrity snubs at his inauguration, and that he eats fast food because he is afraid he might be poisoned.

“Fire and Fury” was supposed to be released next week, but when adapted excerpts began to appear online, publisher Henry Holt and Co. decided to move up the release date to Friday, CNN reported.

>> Trump’s lawyer threatens legal action

Negative quotes in the book about Trump and son Donald Trump Jr. that were attributed to Bannon led to the president claiming that his former top aide had “lost his mind,” CNN reported.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders called the book “complete fantasy,” and Trump attorney Charles J. Harder sent a warning letter to Wolff and Steve Rubin, the president of Holt, warning them to stop publication of the book or face legal action, Politico reported.


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