You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myAJC.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myAJC.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myAJC.com.

The changing health care landscape


Market forces and the Affordable Care Act are together reshaping how health care is organized in Atlanta and across the nation. Doctors are less likely than ever to operate independent solo practices or small groups of specialists.

Instead, doctors and hospitals are coming together to form health care systems that can care for a patient’s every need in multiple hospitals and outpatient facilities. This ongoing consolidation and integration of the health care system is taking place as doctors and hospitals prepare to be paid in a different way.

In the future, health systems do not expect to be paid separately for every surgery, ER visit and annual physical, as is the case in today’s fee-for-service approach. Instead, insurers and government payers are likely to pay the health systems a set fee for handling whatever a patient needs. Other models call for the systems to win financial rewards for efficiency and quality instead of simply being paid more to perform more services.

Many doctors fear that if they do not hitch their practices to a health system soon, they may find it difficult to elbow their way into a system that is winning contracts to provide care. While some doctors are becoming employees of health systems, others are signing professional services contracts that allow them to maintain some of the independence that many physicians value.

Where doctors are working

More and more physicians are selling their ownership interest in their practices (or never assuming such an interest in the first place) and becoming employees of health care systems. Here are nationwide results from the Physicians Foundation’s Biennial Survey taken in 2012. The Medical Association of Georgia says that about 40 percent of its members now work for someone else.

Employed by hospital or group: 43.7%

Practice owner/partner/associate: 48.5%

Other: 7.8%

 

 

Pessimistic about medicine

The Physicians Foundation’s Biennial Survey polled physicians about their attitudes toward their profession. They are decidedly pessimistic now and even moreso about the future.

 

 Source: Physicians Foundation. The survey was emailed successfully to about 600,000 doctors nationwide during the spring of 2012. A total of 13,575 responses were received.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Local

South Georgia wildfire close to 100,000 acres
South Georgia wildfire close to 100,000 acres

The wildfire that started in southeast Georgia earlier this month has burned almost one-fourth of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, officials said Saturday. Known as the West Mims Fire, the blaze now has torched 94,664 acres and is just 8 percent contained, according to a statement from the team that is battling the blaze. Waycross will be impacted...
Record high temperature possible Saturday
Record high temperature possible Saturday

Today: High: 87 Tonight: Low: 67 Tomorrow: High: 85 Better prepare for heat, metro Atlanta. Saturday’s temperature is expected to be near a record high. The forecast high of 87 is just 1 degree lower than the record for this date, Channel 2 meteorologist Brian Monahan said. And the forecast is also well above the average high temperature...
8-month-old gets liver transplant from godmother
8-month-old gets liver transplant from godmother

He’s known as “Finn the Mighty Warrior” on a Facebook page devoted to him, and this 8-month old fighter continues to battle against two rare liver conditions. >> Read more trending news But Finn O’Sullivan won’t have to fight alone. The infant, in need of a transplant, found a match — not from a relative...
At 100-day mark, gauging Trump’s impact on Georgia
At 100-day mark, gauging Trump’s impact on Georgia

President Donald Trump. Curtis Compton/AJC One hundred days into the tenure of the most mold-shattering administration in modern history and President Donald Trump has moved at breakneck pace to try and strip away federal regulations, reset the country’s economic relationships abroad and dismantle the biggest pieces of his predecessor’s...
Woman pulls gun, says barber took too long to give son haircut
Woman pulls gun, says barber took too long to give son haircut

An Ohio woman who believed a barber was taking too long to cut her son’s hair pulled a gun, telling the hairstylist that “I’ve got two clips,” WJW reported. >> Read more trending news According to Crime Stoppers of Cuyahoga County, the incident occurred April 14 at Allstate Barber College in Cleveland. While...
More Stories