What passed, what didn’t as Georgia’s legislative session ended


The Georgia General Assembly wrapped up its work for 2017 early Friday.

Here is a look at the major bills and resolutions that lawmakers introduced this year and their status at the end of the session. Remember: Because this is the first of a two-year legislative session, anything that didn’t pass this week is still alive when lawmakers return in January.

HOUSE

House Bill 9: Would make it a crime to film a person’s private parts without consent. Status: Passed House, Senate committee.

House Bill 37: Would bar funding from any college or university that fails to follow federal immigration law or declares itself a “sanctuary campus.” Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 43: The supplemental budget for the current fiscal year. Status: Signed into law

House Bill 44: The annual state budget bill for the next fiscal year. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 51: Would change how colleges and universities handle sexual assault cases involving students. This bill was later added to Senate Bill 71. Status: Passed House.

House Bill 54: Would increase to 90 percent the value of tax credits for contributions to qualifying rural hospitals. This bill was later added to Senate Bill 180. Status: In House committee.

House Bill 61: Would force e-retailers to either collect sales taxes or report their sales to the Department of Revenue. The Senate later added this bill to House Bill 329. Status: Passed House.

House Bill 64: Would require health insurance companies to pay agents a commission for policies sold. Status: Passed House, Senate committee.

House Bill 65: Would expand the list of conditions that can be treated with medical marijuana. Most of this bill was added to Senate Bill 16 in a compromise. Status: Passed House.

House Bill 71: Would regulate hospital billing to end “surprise” bills that create financial hardship. Status: In House committee.

House Bill 118: Would regulate and tax fantasy sports websites. Status: Passed House, Senate committee.

House Bill 125: Would give tax breaks for yacht owners who bring their luxury vessels to Georgia for repairs. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 126: Would make major changes to the Georgia Judicial Qualifications Commission. Status: Passed House, Senate committee.

House Bill 134: Would allow local governments to levy several fractional sales taxes at once to pay for transportation projects. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 145: Would give Delta Air Lines a tax break on fuel purchased in Georgia. Status: Passed House committee.

House Bill 146: Would allow firefighters to get special health insurance plans to cover expenses from work-related cancers. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 154: Would allow dental hygienists to provide basic dental care at select sites without a dentist in attendance. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 155: Would give a tax credit to music production companies. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 156: Would make Georgia’s weapons permits strictly voluntary and allow anyone to carry concealed weapons without a permit. Status: In House committee.

House Bill 158: Would legalize casino gambling in Georgia. Status: In House committee.

House Bill 159: A rewrite of Georgia’s adoption laws. A Senate committee added language would have allowed private adoption agencies that receive public money to refuse to place children with LGBT families. Status: Passed House, in Senate committee.

House Bill 160: Would create the Georgia Commission on Transit Governance and Funding. Status: Passed House, Senate committee.

House Bill 199: Would give tax credits for video game makers. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 217: Would increase size of the pool to fund tax credits for donations to private school scholarships. Status: Passed House, failed Senate vote.

House Bill 248: Would legalize and regulate driverless cars in Georgia. Similar to Senate Bill 219. Status: In House committee.

House Bill 268: Would create a 26-month deadline for voter applicants to correct discrepancies in the information they submit to the state when they register. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 271: Would create a new system for determining how close to the ocean new homes or businesses can be built. Status: Passed House, in Senate committee.

House Bill 273: Would require public schools to have recess daily for grades K-5. Status: Passed House, Senate committee.

House Bill 280: Would allow weapons permit holders to carry concealed weapons on most parts of public colleges and universities. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 329: Would replace the current graduated state income tax structure with a flat rate of 5.4 percent. Status: Passed House and Senate but in different forms.

House Bill 338: Would allow the state to sanction low-performing school districts that refuse to implement turnaround plans they create. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 340: Would change how leased cars are taxed. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 391: Would extend the time a mother can give up a newborn from seven to 30 days and add police and fire stations to the list of allowed safe harbor locations. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 413: Would set new limits on the ability of pipeline companies to use eminent domain. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 452: Would require the GBI to create and maintain a website that would list immigrants who lack legal status and have been released from federal custody into Georgia. Much of Senate Bill 1, which would broaden and strengthen the state’s domestic terrorism laws, was added to this bill. Status: Passed Legislature.

House Bill 464: Would phase out the cap on patients from Georgia who can be treated at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America hospital in Newnan. Status: In House committee.

House Bill 471: Would require Georgia’s colleges and universities to expand areas designated for free speech and ensure equality in the creation of student organizations. Status: In House committee.

SENATE

Senate Bill 1: Would update and strengthen the state’s domestic terrorism laws. Status: Passed Senate, failed a House vote, but much of its language was added to House Bill 452.

Senate Bill 5: Would require the Georgia Lottery to increase the amount of money it provides for HOPE scholarship and pre-K programs. Status: Passed Senate and House in different forms.

Senate Bill 6: Would create a 19-member Georgia Regional Transit Council. Status: Passed Senate, House committee.

Senate Bill 8: Aims to fix the problem of “surprise billing” after hospital stays. Status: Passed Senate, House committee.

Senate Bill 12: Would allow dental hygienists to perform more procedures in certain situations without a dentist being present. A similar bill, House Bill 154, received final passage. Status: Passed Senate.

Senate Bill 14: Would allow corporations to recoup 100 percent of their donations up to $10,000 to rural hospitals. Status: Passed Legislature.

Senate Bill 16: Would add autism to the list of conditions eligible for treatment with medical marijuana while also reducing the level of THC in the oil approved for use. In a compromise, much of House Bill 65 was added, expanding the list further while keeping the THC level the same. Status: Passed Legislature.

Senate Bill 17: Would allow local governments to let restaurants serve alcohol on Sundays starting at 10:30 a.m. Status: In Senate committee.

Senate Bill 29: Would require Georgia schools and day care facilities to tests drinking water and remediate any lead contamination by June 30, 2019. Status: Passed Senate.

Senate Bill 45: Would outlaw the use of video or still cameras to secretly film a person’s private parts. Status: Passed Senate, House committee. A version of this was added to Senate Bill 104, which passed the Legislature.

Senate Bill 70: Would renew a fee on Georgia hospitals aimed at closing a more than $900 million gap in Medicaid funding. Status: Signed into law

Senate Bill 71: Originally a bill dealing with bankruptcy and health savings accounts, the House stripped it and added House Bill 51 to change how colleges and universities handle sexual assault cases involving students. Status: Passed Senate and House but did not receive final approval.

Senate Bill 79: Would allow for two “destination resort” casinos in Georgia. Status: In Senate committee.

Senate Bill 81: Would require doctors to register with a state database when they prescribe opiates and benzodiazepines. Status: Passed Senate.

Senate Bill 85: Would allow craft beer brewers and liquor distilleries to sell directly to consumers. Status: Passed Legislature.

Senate Bill 99: Would make it easier for some people with past mental health or substance abuse problems to buy a gun. Status: Passed Senate, House committee.

Senate Bill 118: Would raise the mandatory age cap for autism insurance coverage from 6 to 21. Status: In Senate committee.

Senate Bill 123: Would change the terms of the 2008 agreement that allowed the Cancer Treatment Centers of America hospital to open in Newnan. Status: In Senate committee.

Senate Bill 134: Would allow banks and credit unions to offer prizes to people who open savings accounts. Status: Passed Senate, House committee.

Senate Bill 153: Originally a bill dealing with the sale of hearing aids, it was amended in the House to allow optometrists to perform certain procedures only ophthalmologists are now allowed to perform.

Senate Bill 154: Would impose a $5,000 fine on people convicted of aggravated assault or aggravated battery against officers. Status: Passed Legislature.

Senate Bill 155: Would create a statewide commission to study local police pay. Status: Passed Senate.

Senate Bill 157: Would create additional exemptions for the Certificate of Need process of approving new medical facilities. Status: In Senate committee.

Senate Bill 158: Would create additional exemptions to the Certificate of Need program for free-standing emergency services. Status: In Senate committee.

Senate Bill 160: Would impose mandatory minimum prison sentences for criminals convicted of aggravated assault and aggravated battery against a public safety officer. Status: Passed Legislature.

Senate Bill 191: Would set new limits on the ability of pipeline companies to use eminent domain. Much of this bill was added to House Bill 413. Status: Passed Senate, House committee.

Senate Bill 211: Would require the Georgia Board of Education to determine whether nationally recognized tests that students are taking in addition to the mandatory state standardized End of Course Tests, such as the SAT and ACT, measure learning of the same content as the state’s tests. Status: Passed Legislature.

Senate Bill 219: Would allow pilot projects for driverless cars on public roads in certain areas. Status: Passed Legislature.

Senate Bill 233: Would make state law mirror the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Status: In Senate committee.


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