Isakson to hold town hall on Kennesaw State’s campus


U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., will be holding his first in-person town hall event of the year at Kennesaw State University on Monday.

The public event will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the university’s Dr. Bobbie Bailey & Family Performance Center. Tickets are first come, first served.

Health care is expected to be a major theme at next week’s event, since it comes on the heels of Blue Cross Blue Shield’s announcement that it would pull out of metro Atlanta’s Obamacare exchanges next year due to political uncertainty. The forum also comes a few weeks after the Senate GOP’s long-awaited effort to repeal Obamacare collapsed.

Isakson is among the only Georgia GOP legislators scheduled to host public events during the month-long August recess. With the exception of Buddy Carter of Pooler, who is hosting nine in-person town halls this week, and Doug Collins of Gainesville, most Republican congressmen have dodged the spotlight amid a surge of civic activism.

The lawmakers have been under immense pressure to hold in-person town halls since President Donald Trump was sworn into office.

Isakson and his Senate GOP colleague David Perdue saw their email inboxes bombarded and phone lines inundated by callers complaining about Trump and his Cabinet nominees earlier this year. A public meeting their staffs held in Greensboro back in February turned testy in a scene reminiscent of some of the viral confrontations that have marked other congressional town halls across the country. A group of constituents has been hosting weekly protests outside of Perdue’s Atlanta office for months.

Isakson has hosted three telephone town halls over the last several months, polite events that have helped blunt the complaints of some critics about his lack of in-person events. Others, though, have complained about the controlled nature of the calls.

The third-term Republican has largely avoided the public spotlight this spring and summer after a pair of back surgeries stemming from a case of spinal deterioration left him in physical therapy.


Reader Comments ...

Next Up in Georgia Politics

Democrats aim for suburbs in Alabama ahead of Deep South votes
Democrats aim for suburbs in Alabama ahead of Deep South votes

Amanda Wilson has watched with a mix of glee and uncertainty as the imposing homes along this wealthy suburban town’s zigzagging streets has suddenly sprouted Democratic signs. “I’m a blue dot in a big red state,” said Wilson, a 64-year-old retiree. “But I don’t feel as lonely anymore.” Republican U.S. Senate...
Georgia Senate meetings will be live-streamed after Thanksgiving
Georgia Senate meetings will be live-streamed after Thanksgiving

Beginning the Monday after the Thanksgiving holiday, Georgians who are interested in watching state senators at work can live-stream committee meetings being held in the statehouse. Members of the Georgia Senate on Friday held a mock committee meeting led by Senate President Pro Tem David Shafer, R-Duluth, to test out the new wiring and equipment....
Atlanta mayor under fire amid debate over illegal immigration
Atlanta mayor under fire amid debate over illegal immigration

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed is drawing fire from multiple sides in the hot-button debate over illegal immigration after recently announcing the city had joined a nationwide effort in finding legal help for immigrants facing deportation. When Reed announced the city’s new policy this month, he called Atlanta a “welcoming city that stands up...
The Right points to Franken as a symptom of the Left’s hypocrisy
The Right points to Franken as a symptom of the Left’s hypocrisy

The Right has always questioned Franken’s qualifications for the Senate. The revelations of sexual misconduct by the Minnesota  Democrat have added fuel to the fire. A roundup of editorials Friday takes a look at the issue. From The Boston Herald: It’s “physician heal thy self” when it comes to sexual harassment in Congress...
In the light of the news about Al Franken, will the Left own its own sexual misconduct issues?
In the light of the news about Al Franken, will the Left own its own sexual misconduct issues?

Will Sen. Al Franken’s conduct call into question Democrats’ commitment to championing women who have been sexually harassed? A roundup of editorials Friday takes a look at the issue. The Week: Do the Democrats take sexual harassment seriously? We’ll see. From The New Yorker: As the two apologies from Franken show, men still need...
More Stories