How to vote in Georgia’s 6th District runoff


More than 140,300 people voted early ahead of Tuesday’s runoff between Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff, laying a foundation for what many predict will be a bigger turnout now than the race’s original April 18 special election.

With Election Day now here, here’s a primer about voting in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District:

Voting

First, you must live in the district! It sounds simple, but interest is so high local officials have reported out-of-district residents showing up to cast a ballot. Only parts of Cobb, DeKalb and Fulton counties are included in the district. If you’re unsure, check before you go.

Voters can verify whether they are eligible to vote and confirm their local polling location through the Georgia Secretary of State Office’s online “my voter page”website (www.mvp.sos.ga.gov/MVP/mvp.do). You can also call your local county election office.

Don’t forget to bring photo identification, which can include a Georgia driver’s license, even if it’s expired; a state-issued voter identification card; a valid U.S. passport; or a valid U.S. military photo ID.

Election information can also be found on the free “GA SOS” app for your smartphone via iTunes or Google Play for Android.

Voter Etiquette 101

The Do’s and Don’t’s of voting in Georgia:

  • No ballot “selfies” — it’s illegal to take a photo of your ballot. If you want a photo of your “I voted” sticker, wait until you’re outside.
  • No crowding a voting machine booth or entering someone else’s space while he or she is voting.
  • No soliciting votes for your preferred political party or candidate — including wearing written or printed material such as T-shirts or pinned buttons.
  • Don’t use your mobile phone once you’re inside.
  • Do be nice — workers are there to get you in and out as quickly as possible.



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