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Hot on the Right: how does our infrastructure hold up during a natural disaster; the dangers of the great American unchurching; Bannon wants Democrats in control of Congress


Here is a roundup of editorials from Tuesday that includes how and where we should be investing in our infrastructure, Americans are abandoning religion, Steve Bannon wants Democrats to retake Congress

1. Harvey shows need for national infrastructure plan; use Georgia as P3 model

From Saporta Report: “In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, the stress on our nation’s infrastructure is now more pronounced than ever as collapsed roads and bridges in Texas and Louisiana make it impossible for many residents to get on with their lives.”

2. The dangers of the great American unchurching

From The Week: “The Pew poll shows that since 2012 the share of Americans who describe themselves as "spiritual but not religious" has surged from 19 percent to 27 percent, while the share of those who call themselves "religious and spiritual" has declined from 59 percent to 48 percent.”

3. It sure looks like Steve Bannon wants the Democrats to retake Congress

From The Daily Beast: “Former chief White House strategist (and Breitbart boss) Steve Bannon is a revolutionary, not a reformer. So it stands to reason that his efforts to remake the GOP in a more nationalist image must begin with burning things down.”

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