Georgia request on hold as lawsuit temporarily halts voter fraud panel


President Donald Trump’s commission on election integrity has yet to agree to pay the required $250 fee to receive Georgia’s public voter data, although state officials confirmed they have received its request for states to hold off on sending anything while a judge considers a legal complaint against them.

The delay comes as the Washington-based Electronic Privacy Information Center has asked a federal court to grant at least a temporary restraining order as part of a lawsuit seeking to stop the commission from gathering the data. It’s one of at least three federal lawsuits the commission faces.

The commission, formed by Trump in May to investigate unsubstantiated reports of voter fraud in last year’s presidential election, had sent a request two weeks ago for all states’ voter-roll data, including name, address, date of birth, party affiliation, last four Social Security number digits and voting history.

Georgia law allows it to collect information such as voter names, addresses, race and gender, among other data points — information that more than 600 groups including both major political parties have also requested in the past 18 months.

Georgia will not share information, however, considered private under state law such as registered voters’ driver’s license numbers and Social Security numbers. Since the ballot is secret, there are no records that show who a person voted for in any election.

And it won’t send anything unless the commission pays the standard fee, which is required of anyone who requests the public voter file.

The commission’s work coincides with a separate request by the U.S. Justice Department, which is seeking material from at least 44 states including Georgia about how they remove voters from the rolls who should no longer be eligible to vote.

Civil rights groups including those in Georgia have raised alarms about both requests, saying they fear the collected information could be used to purge voting rolls and make it harder to register to vote.


Reader Comments ...

Next Up in Georgia Politics

First American title pawn pays $225K for alleged violations against Georgia customers
First American title pawn pays $225K for alleged violations against Georgia customers

A Georgia title pawn company is paying about $225,000 to settle allegations that it sued customers who defaulted on loans, threatened customers with arrest warrants and misrepresented itself in advertisements. Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr announced last week that First American Title Lending of Georgia will make the payment in response...
The Left warns that GOP tax reform will help no one but the rich
The Left warns that GOP tax reform will help no one but the rich

Tax reform bills offer a break, the left says, but they are a break for businesses, not families. A roundup of editorials Monday takes a look at the issue.Opinions from the Left:1. For tax reform worthy of the name, make it pro-employmentFrom The Hill: Now, just how is this plan going to help American workers? 2. Tax-Cut Bill to Make Scrooge...
The Right looks forward to the relief promised by tax reform
The Right looks forward to the relief promised by tax reform

Will tax reform bills in Congress offer Americans families a break? A roundup of editorials Monday takes a look at the issue. From The Oregonian: Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley warns that the tax reform bill isn’t what you may think it is. From The Democrat-Gazette: Arkansas State Sen. Jason Rapert says the tax reform plan is the best shot for reinvestment...
Some ACA premiums fall while others spike; enrollment keeps surging
Some ACA premiums fall while others spike; enrollment keeps surging

Tyrone Jenkins sat in his insurance agent’s office on Friday, relieved about his health insurance. After all the upheaveal and news over skyrocketing Obamacare premiums, Jenkins will actually see his coverage costs plummet next year. He’ll pay less than half in 2018 what he did in 2017 for similar coverage. How can this be? Jenkins doesn&rsquo...
Democrats aim for suburbs in Alabama ahead of Deep South votes
Democrats aim for suburbs in Alabama ahead of Deep South votes

Amanda Wilson has watched with a mix of glee and uncertainty as the imposing homes along this wealthy suburban town’s zigzagging streets has suddenly sprouted Democratic signs. “I’m a blue dot in a big red state,” said Wilson, a 64-year-old retiree. “But I don’t feel as lonely anymore.” Republican U.S. Senate...
More Stories