Georgia lawmakers question data request from Trump voter fraud panel


A group of Georgia lawmakers on Thursday questioned why President Donald Trump’s commission on election integrity needed to collect data on voters, saying they had heard from constituents who are afraid the information could be used against them.

Leaders from the Georgia Legislative Black Caucus said they planned to introduce a joint resolution for consideration during the General Assembly’s next annual meeting early next year, seeking to block such information-sharing outside the state. While the resolution would largely be seen as symbolic — the caucus is Democratic and a majority of the state Legislature is Republican, as is state leadership — the group said they wanted to make a point.

“This for a lot of us takes us back to the days when African Americans went in to vote and they were asked to count jelly beans in a jar, and say how many jelly beans were in the jar before they were given the opportunity to vote,” said state Rep. Roger Bruce, D-Atlanta. He said he was most upset that the federal panel, which Trump created to investigate unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud during last year’s presidential election, had asked states to provide voters’ voting histories if that information was available.

“Whether you voted as a Democrat or whether you voted as a Republican — why is that relevant to whether or not there was fraud during voting?” Bruce said. “To me, things like that are saying we want to do something with that information to make sure that we have an advantage whenever the next election comes up – and that the other side has a disadvantage.”

Georgia officials have said some — but not all — of the requested information is already publicly available under state law for a standard fee of $250. They have requested payment of that fee before it will process the panel’s request.

Georgia officials said they would not share information considered private under state law such as registered voters’ driver’s license numbers and Social Security numbers, although they planned to share data already made available to any member of the public who requests it — including voter names, addresses, race if provided by the voter and gender.


Reader Comments ...

Next Up in Georgia Politics

The Left questions the reasons behind deporting Haitians who were here legally
The Left questions the reasons behind deporting Haitians who were here legally

Thousands of Haitians have now lost their Temporary Protected Status, the deportation protection that allowed them to live and work in the United States following the devastating earthquake of 2010. A roundup of editorials Tuesday takes a look at the issue. From The New York Daily News: Trump’s decision is not about undocumented immigrants. The...
The Right may need to dump Roy Moore, but they want to see the Left dump Al Franken first
The Right may need to dump Roy Moore, but they want to see the Left dump Al Franken first

Is it OK when it’s our guy involved in sexual misconduct, but not when it’s theirs? A roundup of editorials Tuesday takes a look at the issue. From The Resurgent: Do you think Republicans are going to condemn Roy Moore if Democrats are not doing the same with Al Franken? From Townhall: Roy Moore has to go, but, then, so does Sen. Al Franken...
Georgia attorney general warns holiday shoppers to protect themselves
Georgia attorney general warns holiday shoppers to protect themselves

Before shopping for the holidays, Georgia customers should take precautions against fraud, rip-offs and identity theft. Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr says the prevalence of online gift buying makes it more important than ever for customers to safeguard their wallets and identities. He provided several tips: Shoppers should consider using...
Federal tax overhaul plans target bonds widely used in Georgia
Federal tax overhaul plans target bonds widely used in Georgia

Congressional proposals to change the U.S. tax structure may have a major impact in the future on infrastructure projects in Georgia — from road construction to how much students pay to live in college dorms. The tax overhaul that the U.S. House passed last week would eliminate the kind of bonds the University System of Georgia has used to build...
First American title pawn pays $225K for alleged violations against Georgia customers
First American title pawn pays $225K for alleged violations against Georgia customers

A Georgia title pawn company is paying about $225,000 to settle allegations that it sued customers who defaulted on loans, threatened customers with arrest warrants and misrepresented itself in advertisements. Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr announced last week that First American Title Lending of Georgia will make the payment in response...
More Stories