Early voting in Georgia’s 6th District tops 46,000 over weekend


Early voting in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District topped 46,000 over the weekend, with two weeks of early voting still to go ahead of the hotly contested June 20 runoff between Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff.

The total includes early votes cast Saturday in Fulton County, which kept polls open to accommodate voters’ weekend schedules. Select polling locations will additionally be open this coming Saturday in all three counties with areas in the 6th District, including Cobb, DeKalb and Fulton.

The turnout as soon as mid-week could surpass the entire total from the contest’s original April 18 special election, when about 55,000 people cast early ballots.

Early voting for the runoff began last week and runs through June 16.

Poll update: Jon Ossoff, Karen Handel locked in close race, according to WSBTV poll

How to vote early

Check where to vote before you go. These are not your regular neighborhood polling places. The municipalities only open select sites during the early-voting period. See below for early voting locations listed by county.

Who can vote: You must be a registered voter, live in the 6th District and visit an early voting location in your home county of Cobb CountyDeKalb County or Fulton County. Early voting locations are open on weekdays, in addition to Saturday voting on Saturday, June 10 and select other times.

Use the Secretary of State Office’s personalized online “my voter page” website (www.mvp.sos.ga.gov/MVP/mvp.do) to find more information and confirm your registration status.

Or call your local elections office to find early-voting locations or look for the “advance voting info” link under the elections tab of the Secretary of State Office’s website (www.sos.ga.gov).

Don’t forget to bring photo identification, which can include a Georgia driver’s license, even if it’s expired; a state-issued voter identification card; a valid U.S. passport; or a valid U.S. military photo ID.

No “ballot selfies” are allowed at the polls, so wait to snap a photo until you’re outside. It is illegal in Georgia to take pictures of a ballot or voting equipment, but the Secretary of State Office has said it has seen voters in previous elections post “ballot selfies” on social media — something that could get you in trouble with the law.

Information about local elections can also be found on the free “GA SOS” app for your smartphone via iTunes or Google Play for Android.



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