You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myAJC.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myAJC.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myAJC.com.

breaking news

Student arrested after bomb threat on North Hall Middle campus

Atlanta rally to save Affordable Care Act draws scores


Vicki Hopper was diagnosed with breast cancer in July of 2014, two days after purchasing insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

Today, she, credits the health care legislation with saving her life.

“Without insurance, I would be looking at $500,000 in medical bills and I would have no way of paying them since I haven’t been able to work,” Hopper, 58, said. “To have to figure out how to pay these expenses would have added additional stress to my life.”

Hopper, along with about 100 other Georgians, gathered next to the state Capitol as part of the Save My Care Bus Tour, a two-month, cross-country tour dedicated to warning U.S. Congress against repealing the Act.

Republican lawmakers in Washington, who for years derided the measure as coercive and expensive for healthy individuals, are now balancing campaign promises to repeal the plan with potential blame for disruptions or loss in coverage if no replacement plan is enacted.

While Georgia Republicans took a wait-and-see approach after Donald Trump was elected president, Democrats have focused on Medicaid.

House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams, D-Atlanta, who spoke at the rally, said health care should be a right, not a privilege in Georgia and has left some unprotected.

“In Georgia, we’ve refused to expand Medicaid to cover the [portion] of our population that makes too much money for abject poverty but not enough to be healthy,” she said.

Tom Price, the newly confirmed Secretary of Health and Human Services, is tasked with overseeing a health policy that keeps insurance affordable, prevents chaos in the insurance market and decreases the government’s role in health care. The former Congressman from Georgia has already proposed a rule aimed at stabilizing the marketplace of insurance and has several alternatives for a replacement plan.

“We will not go back to satisfy someone’s political ambition so he can hurt the very people who need him most,” Abrams said.

The rally attracted Georgians fearful of losing health insurance as well as some generally opposed to actions Trump has taken as president.

Hopper directed her desperate pleas to Sens. Johnny Isakson and David Perdue.

“I beg you to represent me, the state of Georgia and every American person in this country by putting people first over politics,” she said. “Don’t take away my health care.”



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Georgia Politics

An 18-candidate debate shows how jumbled Georgia special election is
An 18-candidate debate shows how jumbled Georgia special election is

The vast field of candidates racing to represent Georgia’s 6th Congressional District kept the escalating feuds with each other largely beneath the surface and instead focused on a range of competing ideologies on tax overhauls and health policies Wednesday at the first major event featuring all 18 contenders. The leading Republican candidates...
Watchdog: Georgia bill lets cities take blighted land for developers
Watchdog: Georgia bill lets cities take blighted land for developers

Georgia voters are not fans of eminent domain — the condemnation of private property by government — especially when government officials do it to fatten their tax base. In 2006, Georgia voters sent as strong a message as you are likely to hear when 83 percent of them said government shouldn’t seize private property for economic...
Table set for deal on Georgia income tax cut, e-retail levy
Table set for deal on Georgia income tax cut, e-retail levy

The Georgia Senate backed legislation that would provide a $200 million income tax cut — mostly to upper-middle and upper-income earners — and that aims to force e-retailers to collect sales taxes on what they sell. The vote sets up tax cut negotiations between the House and Senate that may not end until the final hours of the 2017 session...
Georgia Senate attempts an 11th-hour amendment on ‘religious liberty’
Georgia Senate attempts an 11th-hour amendment on ‘religious liberty’

The Georgia Senate made a last-minute attempt late Tuesday night to add a “religious liberty” provision to an unrelated bill, the second time in as many weeks the chamber has sought to include protections for faith-based groups that are opposed to same-sex marriage. No vote was taken on the proposal, which came after 11 p.m. But the...
Campus guns, medical marijuana win key votes to move ahead in Georgia
Campus guns, medical marijuana win key votes to move ahead in Georgia

A measure to allow guns onto any campus in Georgia’s public college and university system passed the state Senate, one of several crucial votes taken Tuesday as lawmakers head into the final day of the legislative session. A bill to ban state support for Georgia colleges that declare themselves “sanctuaries” for students...
More Stories