You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to myAJC.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks

X

Welcome to myAJC.com

This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content.

You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myAJC.com.

Disagreement over who should control Georgia’s school turnaround work


Georgia’s elected school superintendent argues that he should be in the middle of any major school turnaround effort as lawmakers consider a bill that focuses on struggling schools.

House Bill 338 by Rep. Kevin Tanner, R-Dawsonville, passed the House last week and is now up for debate in the Senate. It creates the position of “Chief Turnaround Officer,” overseeing state intervention in the lowest-performing schools.

Tanner chose to have the officer report to the state Board of Education, which is appointed by the governor, rather than to the state superintendent, who is elected. Asked why at a hearing of the Senate Education and Youth Committee Monday, Tanner said it’s because the board sets policy for the state Department of Education.

“So the real power base is with that state board,” he said.

But the superintendent is in charge of the education department and its staff of roughly 600. They have deep experience and direct access to funding. Richard Woods, the superintendent, said the turnaround chief would be better off reporting to him.

“Having this individual fully incorporated with the structure of DOE is very imperative,” Woods said.

The hearing was cut short and will resume Friday, with Woods and nearly a dozen others scheduled to testify.

HB 338 is what some have referred to as “Plan B” for the Opportunity School District proposal, which was struck down by voters in a referendum in November.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Education

Kennesaw State’s African studies major in danger of being cut
Kennesaw State’s African studies major in danger of being cut

Kennesaw State University’s African and African Diaspora Studies degree program could be cut due to lack of graduates, the school confirmed Friday. African studies faculty met Thursday with university officials to discuss the program’s dire situation. In a statement, KSU said all at the meeting agreed to increase efforts to recruit...
Kennesaw State hiring more faculty to meet increasing enrollment
Kennesaw State hiring more faculty to meet increasing enrollment

Kennesaw State University president Sam Olens said Friday his deans are trying to hire more faculty members as the school grapples with its increasing enrollment. The university has hired additional faculty members this school year, he said, in areas such as engineering. Olens said he’s directed his team to hire at least 25 professors...
South Fulton crash victim’s mom: ‘The tears are the ambitions that he had’
South Fulton crash victim’s mom: ‘The tears are the ambitions that he had’

Photos splayed across the dining room table at Elke Velez’s South Fulton County home showed her youngest son, Isaiah Gregory, at various stages of his young life. In many, he wore a football uniform. “Anybody who knows Isaiah knows he loved baseball and basketball,” Velez said, smiling. “He wanted to be in the NFL, wanted...
Deal signs law for charter schools
Deal signs law for charter schools

Gov. Nathan Deal signed legislation Thursday that helps charter schools by making it easier for them to acquire unused school buildings and improving their access to funding.  House Bill 430 mandates hearings for charter schools that are trying to obtain unused school buildings and ensures they get a proportional share of certain federal...
Deal signs school turnaround legislation, calls it a ‘dramatic step’
Deal signs school turnaround legislation, calls it a ‘dramatic step’

With the stroke of a pen Thursday, Gov. Nathan Deal initiated an experiment that could yield innovative strategies for improving Georgia’s lowest-performing schools or saddle him and future governors with an intractable problem. House Bill 338 was not Deal’s first choice of tools to fix schools. Last year, voters rejected a referendum on...
More Stories