Readers Write: May 19


Name change erases symbols of the past

Another day, another eraser of the past. The latest is a high school in South Burlington, Vermont, that is eliminating the “rebels” nickname from the school’s sports teams. Supporters (not a majority of students and parents) of the name change argue that the nickname is associated with the Confederacy, which makes some students feel unsafe. Did this name cause students to feel unsafe last year; five years ago; 10 years ago? Why now?

If the progressives have their way, it won’t be long before all of the history and symbols of the Civil War and anything else they deem distasteful will be destroyed and references to said war will be illegal. George Santayana, philosopher, wrote that “Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” This country will repeat a lot of mistakes but fortunately, because of historical revisions and eliminations, all of the mistakes and life lessons will seem brand new.

DOUG BROOKS, DULUTH

Comey firing prompts mixed feelings

Like many people, I have mixed feelings about former FBI Director James Comey. From what I have read and heard in various media outlets, it sounds like he was pursuing the issue of Russian interference in our 2016 presidential election in earnest. Despite President Trump’s assertions about his motives for Comey’s dismissal, I find it too great of a coincidence that it occurred shortly after Comey requested additional resources from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein for this investigation into Russian interference and possible links to the Trump campaign. Though I think that President Trump’s actions may have less to do with criminal behavior and more to do with his intolerance of criticism, I have two questions that I think that Congressional representatives and journalists should ask. What resources was Comey requesting? What is the status of this request?

GEORGE ECKARD, DECATUR




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