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Readers Write: March 29


Modern streetcars ugly, huge

I was around to see and ride the original Atlanta streetcars, and today’s version is a far cry from being popular and serving a useful purpose for riders (“Streetcar issues still unresolved,” News, March 19). Today’s streetcars lack the style and feel as well as the functional purpose streetcars provide in other cities. Take one look at these monsters and you are struck by how ugly and huge they are. There is something missing that, for instance, San Francisco has. I remember the noise and sparks coming from the old streetcars. Perhaps the reason the new streetcars are failing is that folks just don’t like them.

ALTON POWELL, CHATTAHOOCHEE HILLS

Dirtier air looms on horizon in U.S.

Let’s forget for a moment that President Trump claims that climate change is a “hoax.” Let’s also forget that his choice to head the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, says “we don’t know that yet” in response to the worldwide scientific community’s statement that carbon dioxide emission is a primary contributor to climate change.

Let’s accept that EPA regulations on vehicle emissions will be rolled back and that coal-fired power plants will become as cost-effective as the much cleaner gas-fired plants. In short, let’s accept that high carbon-output vehicles and electricity sources will run unchecked and unimproved, with no government regulations or oversight.

Forget the time-wasting climate change debate. Let’s just think about this summer, when Atlanta’s heat and humidity mix with our carbon emissions to create 40 or more code orange or red smog alert days. Then realize that with regulations rolled back, this summer will feature the cleanest air we and our descendants will ever breathe.

FRANK MOORE, ROSWELL




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