Readers Write: March 23


Reps need face-to-face feedback

In this current political climate of divisiveness, personal connections matter. The recent article (“Voters want in-person town halls,” News, March 13) resonated with me. Voters are seeking to be heard by their representatives. Although some of these representatives may fear confrontation with angry constituents, I have found that more contact with our representatives reduces, rather than entrenches, divisions.

Since the election, I have begun to regularly call my representatives’ offices. The results have surprised me. I have made personal connections with some of the staffers at these offices. As a result, I cannot help but see our representatives as people, despite often disagreeing with their policies. Likewise, I am not some nameless, angry constituent anymore. I have a name, a voice, and personal stories.

If more of us take time to get to know those with opposing views, maybe we can start bridging some of the divisions in our community.

MELISSA HOPKINSON, BISHOP

GOP too timid to meet with public

Georgia’s Republican delegation has largely decided against facing constituents at town hall meetings, Rep. Buddy Carter excepted. They hung tough, silent when Trump supporters were calling journalists Lugenpresse — lying press — a 1930s Nazi slur. They were forbearing when hecklers shouted “lock her up” about our most-investigated — and never found culpable — former First Lady.

But now they won’t participate in town hall meetings, except for Carter. Constituents genuinely want to know the who, when, where, and how of Russian interference in our election. Citizens want to know about a proposed health care bill that comforts the most comfortable and afflicts the afflicted and struggling. This does not call for the bravery of military service. This is meeting in an auditorium with citizens, many of us old gals. In the end, these Republicans are just too timid to meet face-to-face with their fellow Georgians.

MARY BOSSERMAN, DECATUR




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