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Readers Write: March 30


We must eliminate divisiveness

This country is split, not physically, but politically. The most insidious example of this is the way our representatives and senators position themselves in the audience (and react) when the president makes a speech to Congress in the State of the Union.

This should be changed. Naturally, the members of the Supreme Court should be together in a group as should also be the chiefs of the various armed forces. Otherwise, the ladies and gentlemen representing our country in Congress should be assigned seats so that all of the senators (both Democrats and Republicans) would be together (possibly alphabetic according to last name), and with similar arrangements for members of the house of representatives. Such an arrangement would put an end to the ridiculous manner in which about half the political members of the audience will stand and clap for something said by the speaker while the other members remain seated. It amplifies one of the most serious problems we have concerning how our elected officials behave, not only in situations such as this but most certainly in the day-to-day happenings in these branches of our government. We need to get rid of this “side of the aisle” mentality. Our representatives should vote for or against issues based on their own personal convictions instead of toeing the “party line.”

BOB GRAYSON, CUMMING

Jesus said we should treat the sick

Nicholas Kristof’s column (“Parables on healing, …”, Opinion, March 23) is right on target. In the name of Jesus, we are to treat the homeless, the sick — all of the “least of these” — as we would treat Jesus. However, I have become so discouraged by the tone and direction of today’s politics, that I find it increasingly unlikely that our nation will ever seek to follow and serve Jesus as he is embodied in the “least of these.” In the meantime, we should at least have the honesty and integrity to quit claiming that the United States is a “Christian nation.”

DAVIS BYRD, CANTON




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