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Readers Write: March 3


Voters’ rights bill to expand poll access

The Georgia General Assembly will soon be voting on the “Georgia Voters’ Bill of Rights,” a comprehensive bill that would allow Georgians to register to vote automatically, to update their registration when interacting with several state agencies, and to update their address on Election Day. The Voters’ Bill of Rights also requires reasonably spaced early voting locations and a polling location within 25 miles of every voter.

I’m lucky – voting has always been easy for me. I have reliable transportation, a flexible work environment, supportive employers who want everyone to have the opportunity to vote, and a stable address for registration. Many Georgians aren’t so lucky. Students, the elderly, members of the armed services, people with disabilities, people who can’t miss work, parents with young children, all may find it very difficult to vote. The Voters’ Bill of Rights helps them to exercise their right to vote.

Voting shouldn’t be reserved for the lucky. We should want every citizen to have the opportunity to vote. Every eligible voter deserves a say on Election Day, and expanding access to the polls is commonsense. I urge all of our citizens and elected representatives to support the Georgia Voters’ Bill of Rights.

LAURA CRAWLEY, DECATUR

Voters should not be led by fear

I would like to ask the citizens of this country to hit the pause button. To take a moment apart from the highly contentious political rhetoric to stop and consider the choice before the people in this country. We can choose to allow the “moneychangers in the temple” to continue to lead us from a base of fear with fingers and guns pointing outward toward the world. Or, we can see those different from ourselves (racial, political, gender, etc.) as brothers and sisters in our human family and find a way for every person to have the basic needs of life met. Research shows that the most effective way to battle terrorism is to meet the basic needs of all persons in our communities and the world.

BARBARA ADLE, DECATUR




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