Readers Write: March 7


Times have changed since Civil Rights Act

Minorities who think the Civil Rights Act has allowed them to either get or keep a job need to give themselves more credit. They were hired or are retained because their employer thinks they are a net benefit to the company. Otherwise, like whites, they’d be gone. The EEOC is a settlement mill. Take the cash and take your chances. I say this as an attorney with 30-plus years of experience.

There might be some incidents where someone is not hired because the employer wants a better “fit.” I (a white, Christian male) was once told by a recruiter, following an interview for a job I very much wanted, that the people who interviewed me from the company — a black male and a Jewish female — said I would not be a good fit. Rather than sue, I decided they probably were right.

Times have changed. Let’s take off the chains of the Civil Rights Act, and see how things work out.

ALLEN BUCKLEY, ATLANTA

DNR should cancel killing contest

I was shocked to hear that there will be a coyote killing contest in our state where the grand prize is a lifetime hunting license.

Killing contests are not an effective method for managing wildlife, yet contest organizers frequently justify their events with claims that they are doing a service by eliminating “varmints.” Killing coyotes and other native carnivores under a misguided belief system that “reducing predators” will protect ungulate herds like deer and elk, or make livestock safer is not supported by the best available science.

Killing animals for cash and prizes in contests is inconsistent with the values of Georgians. Newspaper pictures of stacks of bloody carcasses send the wrong message to the rest of the country. Like dogfighting and cockfighting, killing contests will not be tolerated by a modern society.

Responsible hunters are guided by ethics that promote respect for wildlife. With this in mind, the DNR should cancel the Georgia Coyote Challenge.

LISA POWELL-HUBERTY, MARIETTA




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