Readers Write: March 16


Why no investigations of Democrats?

I do not understand. The Republican Congress spent several years investigating Democrats at the slightest opportunity: the IRS, State Department, Justice Department, and so on. Now, they have an opportunity and a “charge” from the Republican president to investigate his predecessor. President Trump accused, with certainty, Obama of a major felony. Almost every Republican resists this charge to investigate Obama himself. The president asked his party in Congress to investigate. Yet, every Republican committee resists. If Trump is right, I would expect rallies of “lock him up,” but all we hear from Republicans is silence. Does this seem odd, yet curious? They have the authority to actually prove major felonies by Trump’s predecessor. Yet, they are doing nothing now. Does this seem odd, yet curious? Sen. Purdue? Sen. Isakson? Anyone able to explain this to us curious citizens?

BILL NEWNAM, ATLANTA

Do peaceful Muslims sympathize with caliphate?

Christianity has different sub‑groups such as Methodists, Baptists, Catholics, etc., that have slightly different theological beliefs. And most Christians are willing to say that they are Methodists, Catholics, or whatever, so we have some idea of what they believe. The different theological sub‑groups in Islam are not so well-identified, and this makes it difficult for non‑Muslims to understand the differences. I wish someone would say that sect “A” believes that the Quran requires Muslims to subdue or kill infidels, and sect “B” does not believe that. Then every Muslim (and their leaders) should publicly self‑identify as belonging to either A or B (or some other well‑defined sect). Unfortunately, most Muslims appear to try to avoid announcing their core beliefs about infidels. This leads non‑Muslims to speculate that many Muslims who lead apparently peaceful lives, actually secretly sympathize with the desire to establish the caliphate.

BILL WHITLOW, AUBURN




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