Readers Write: March 10


Dems reduced to bitterness, tantrums, tears

The daily diet of hysteria over the Trump administration has reached lows that would embarrass even the most petulant, spoiled child. We are entitled to adult representation by elected officials whose task is to responsibly serve the citizens of the United States. Instead we are watching a partisan stooges act devoid of efforts to meet sworn Constitutional responsibility. Democrats are mired in a vicious post-election attack on everything that they no longer control, complete with bitterness, tantrums and tears. Republicans have chosen to forego adult behavior and disappear under the bed instead. Shame on them all. We had an election. Some people won and some didn’t. That’s our political system. It’s time for our politicians in Washington to grow up, get to work, and do their job without partisan petulance. It’s the right of “We The People” to be responsibly represented, and their obligation to responsibly deliver. Enough is enough.

DENNIS MCGOWAN, SNELLVILLE

Center should not have canceled statue

The mission of the Center for Civil and Human Rights is to link the American civil rights movement (with an emphasis on Atlanta’s role) with the global struggle for human rights. One of the most pressing human rights issues today is that of human trafficking. In fact, Atlanta ranks among the top U.S. cities in the country for sex trafficking of minors.

It is therefore particularly disturbing when the Center backed out of a written agreement for a statue to commemorate the victims of World War II sex trafficking (“Civil Rights Center cancels ‘comfort women’ memorial,” News, March 3). What does this say about the Center’s commitment to educating the public on such an important human rights issue? The planned memorial is not “just history,” sex trafficking is happening today, as you read this, in our city.

Shame on the leadership of the Center for bowing to pressure from Japanese interests.

JOANN WEISS, LAWRENCEVILLE




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