Readers Write: March 2


No purpose in ‘religious liberty’ bill

Since many citizens of Georgia do not look past the title of the “religious liberty” bill, legislators can trumpet to their constituents about their religiosity and earn their votes. The reality is that it should be titled “Whoopee, We Get to Discriminate Bill;” there is no religion to the bill that Gov. Nathan Deal has vetoed once and, with its resurrection, needs to do again. Senate Bill 233 is the kind of legislation that sends business, sporting events, conventions, etc. to other states because leaders who make decisions about where to locate their activity find such sanctioned discrimination abhorrent and morally wrong. We see clearly the effects on North Carolina’s legislation along these lines: boycotts, relocated sporting events, etc. It seems more like self-sabotage legislation than anything that would serve any constructive purpose. Thank you Gov. Deal for having the continued guts to veto bad legislation.

JOHN SHACKLETON, BROOKHAVEN

Banks not about to get rid of employees

It was interesting to read that some banks are piloting so-called robo-banks (“Bank tellers may be the next blacksmiths,” Business, Feb. 19). Indeed, banks are changing to meet evolving consumer habits, and technology is an important part of the mix. Still, sounding the death knell for well-peopled bank locations is premature.

One size does not fit all. Banking models have not changed so much that most consumers should loop out of a traditional banking relationship altogether. Some banks may offer the opportunity for a client to have a narrow transactional relationship (for instance, having only a checking account at a bank), but most of us look for a fuller banking relationship when it comes time for lending or other more relationship-based consumer financial needs.

BRENT ADAMS, ATLANTA




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