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Readers Write: March 31


Parole should be denied for abusive parents

Thank you for the follow-up on Mitt Comer (“Son speaks of abuse for first time,” News, March 24). I appreciate the update on how he’s doing and am grateful that he’s doing well. He is a remarkable young man with an amazingly positive attitude. I am appalled that his parents are up for parole this quickly. I do not believe their punishment fits the crime and hope their parole is denied. This was an intentional heinous act carried out for at least two years against someone they should have been protecting. Thank goodness for Paulding County District Attorney Dick Donovan’s efforts and the family that took Mitt in after he was brought back from California. Most importantly, thank God for Mitt himself and the wonderful example he sets for us all.

BARBARA TAYLOR, CUMMING

Guest column sheds light on immigration

I enjoyed reading Parthiv Parekh’s views on the immigration realities that now have a firm entrenchment in the U. S. economy and social fabric (“How illegal immigration really came to be,” Opinion, March 25). I am in agreement with most of his conclusions and suggested solutions, including the humanitarian and moral high road he recommends for “those already here” — while also advocating a reversal of the “porous borders” realities in order to stem the continuous onslaught of “those yet to come.”

So far so good, but I would love for Mr. Parekh to continue with his intellectual and moral reasoning skills – and I am saying this sincerely, not facetiously – to determine the root cause of why it became beneath the dignity of every U.S. citizen to have to run a lawnmower, spread pinestraw, swing a hammer, wait on tables, mop floors, make beds, pick fruit, pluck chickens and the like over the past couple of decades.

I would posit that unless this is understood, and addressed and remedied (assuming the populace cares for remedies), those not already here will continue to come and find ways to do so. Supply will meet demand.

CAMERON ADAIR, ATLANTA




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